Academic Services

What is an appeal

What can, and cannot, be considered under the Student Appeal Regulations.

An appeal is a request for a decision to be reviewed in relation to:

  • marks
  • progression
  • degree classification
  • degree award
  • decisions of Student Discipline Officers or the Student Discipline Committee
  • decisions of Fitness to Practise Panels
  • exclusion decisions

 

Grounds for appeal

In order to submit an appeal, students must ensure that their case meets one or more of the specific grounds under which an appeal may be submitted. There are two grounds available for all students:

A:         substantial information directly relevant to the quality of performance in the examination which for good reason was not available to the examiners when their decision was taken;

B:         alleged irregular procedure or improper conduct of an examination. For this purpose “conduct of an examination” includes conduct of a meeting of the Board of Examiners;

There is one additional ground for appeal. This is only available for Postgraduate Research students for academic appeals:

C:        evidence of prejudice or lack of due diligence in the examination on the part of any examiners.

It is important to note that, in order for your appeal to be upheld, you must satisfy one or more of the above noted grounds.

 

Appeals which will not be accepted

Appeals will not be accepted where they consist of:

  • A challenge to academic judgement: a judgement made about a matter where only the opinion of an academic expert will suffice. For example, where a student feels their coursework was deserving of a higher mark, or that a different decision should have been made in relation to a Special Circumstances request.
  • The retrospective notification of Special Circumstances affecting performance. Ignorance of the requirements for the submission of special circumstances, or failure to submit Special Circumstances, does not constitute grounds for appeal.

 

Appeal outcomes

An appeal is a request for the re-consideration of a decision by the body that made the original decision. Only the relevant Board of Examiners, Special Circumstances Committee, Progression Board or other decision making body can make decisions on your case. If your appeal is upheld by a sub-committee, it is referred back to the original body that made the decision for their re-consideration, in light of the information contained within your appeal.

As a result, this means that an appeal will not usually:

  • Change marks
  • Allow you to pass
  • Re-mark your work
  • Award you a re-sit
  • Reverse a decision or penalty

Only following a full hearing of the Appeal Committee might the Appeal Committee exercise its discretion in varying a decision, if they find that there is appropriate evidence to do so.

Full details of possible outcomes from a sub-committee of the Appeal Committee and a full hearing of the Appeal Committee are explained within the Student Appeal Regulations.

 

Appeal statistics 2013/14 - 2017/18