Reflection Toolkit

List of tools for reflection

A quick overview of all presented reflective tools and a description of the associated example reflections.

Models for reflecting on experience

The 5R framework for reflection

This framework takes you through Reporting, Responding, Relating, Reasoning, and Reconstructing.

Example
Reflecting on a meeting with a supervisor

Comments: The reflector had a vague objective going into the meeting and did not manage to get what they needed from it, leaving them feeling that they wasted time.

This example does not reference theoretical literature to support the reflection.

5R framework (within Reflectors' Toolkit)

 

The CARL framework of reflection

This framework takes you through Context, Action, Results, and Learning.

Examples
  • Developing public speaking as a skill over time
  • Relfection of specific experience of a public speaking opportunity

Comments: The two examples complement each other. They look at the same experience of speaking on front of a group of high school students who are interested in studying the degree of the speaker. However, one example reflects on an overarching process level, where the other reflects on a specific experience level.

These examples do not reference theoretical literature to support the reflection.

CARL framework (within Reflectors’ Toolkit)

 

The four F’s of active reviewing

This framework takes you through Facts, Feelings, Findings, Future.

Examples
  • An experience of success in a workplace
  • Making a mistake in a workplace

Comments: The first example show how reflection can easily be applied in situations that go well. Here a retail worker deals with a challenging customer.

The second example is a waiter reflecting on their experience of forgetting an order.

These examples do not reference theoretical literature to support the reflection.

Four F’s of active reviewing (within Reflectors’ Toolkit)

 

Gibbs’ reflective cycle

This model takes you through Description, Feelings, Evaluation, Analysis, Conclusion, and Action plan.

Examples
  • Reflecting on a group work experience in about 1000 words
  • Reflection on a group work experience in about 300 words

Comments: The examples reflect each other. Both examples use the same scenario of a group where the work was divided between the members. When the group combined their work they found they much more work was needed.

The example reflections show how reflections can be brief and lengthy – both have their pros and cons.

These examples reference theoretical literature to support the reflection.

Gibbs’ reflective cycle (within Reflectors’ Toolkit)

 

The integrated reflective cycle

This model takes you through The Experience, Reflecting on Action, Theory, and Preparation.

Example
Consultation with a patient

Comments: The reflector follows the instructions of a theoretical model too rigidly in a patient consultation, and updates their understanding.

While this example is specific to a medical field, there are elements of nervousness and performance anxiety, which should be quite general.

This example references theoretical literature to support the reflection.

Integrated reflective cycle (within Reflectors’ Toolkit)

 

What? So what? Now What?

This model takes you through three core questions: What? So what? Now What?

Examples
  • Getting an assignment back
  • Participation in workshops

Comments: The first example shows a reflection on getting a mark lower than what the reflector was hoping for.

The second example is a reflection on finding it challenge to participate in workshops.

These examples do not reference theoretical literature to support the reflection.

What? So what? Now What? (within Reflectors’ Toolkit)

 

Self-awareness activities

Goal setting

Setting goals can be an extremely powerful activity. On this page a series of reflective questions is provided to ensure that the goal setting process is reflective.

Goal setting (within the Reflectors’ Toolkit)

Items for self-awareness

A fun activity that uses items as a foundation for the reflective process. The goal of the activity is to choose an item that mirrors a certain quality. When done correctly and reflectively it can be a helpful activity to get a new perspective. Types of questions could be: ‘Choose an item from your room that shows how you are as a learner’.

Items for self-awareness (within the Reflectors’ Toolkit)

Strengths and weaknesses

Being able to identify what your strengths and weaknesses are is valuable both for personal knowledge and to be able to communicate them to others. On this page two reflective activities are provided to help you identify your strengths and weaknesses.

Strengths and weaknesses (within the Reflectors’ Toolkit)

Values

Knowing what your personal values are can be extremely beneficial to help you prioritise and make decisions. On this page two reflective approaches are provided for identifying your values.

Values (within the Reflectors’ Toolkit)

Writing letters to your future and past selves

Looking into the future and examining the past can help inform how we should act in the present. On this page directions for two reflective letter-writing activities are provided; one for your past self and one for your future self.

Writing letters to your future and past selves (within the Reflectors’ Toolkit)