Janice Bramham

Senior Lecturer and Programme DIrector for MSc Biochemistry

Background

2014-current    Lecturer and Programme Director for MSc Biochemistry, University of Edinburgh

2008-2014    Manager of Biophysical Characterisation Facility, CTCB, University of Edinburgh

2004-08    Lecturer, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh

2002-04    MRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow, School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh

Qualifications

1993    PhD, St Andrews University

1985    BSc (Hons) Chemistry, University of Warwick

Undergraduate teaching

Current

Undergraduate honours research project supervision

Previous

The Dynamic Cell (2nd year Biology) - Course Organisert, lecturer, tutor, practical leader

Molecules Genes and Cells  (1st year Biology) - lecturer, tutor, practical leader

Foundations in Biological Chemistry (1st year Biology) - tutor

Structure and Function of Proteins (3rd year Biology) - lecturer

Biochemical Techniques (4th year Biology ) - lecturer

Structural Biology (4th year Biology) - lecturer, tutor

Biophysical Chemistry (4th year chemistry) - lecturer

 

Postgraduate teaching

MSc in Biochemistry  (Programme Director, Personal Tutor and Lecturer)

Course Organiser and Lecturer for:

Biochemistry A

Biochemistry B

Practical Skills in Biochemistry A

Practical Skills in Biochemistry B

Biophysical Chemistry

Research Project Proposal

MSc Research Project and Dissertation supervision

Research summary

I am interested in the three-dimensional structures, intrinsic dynamics and interactions of biological macromolecules with the ultimate aim of understanding their structure-function relationships.  Current work is focused upon multi-domain, disulphide-bonded, glycoslyated proteins, many of which act as membrane receptors, including:

  • proteins of the human complement system, which plays an essential role in our immune response to infection;
  • proteins involved in bone metabolism, in order to understand the molecular basis of bone diseases;
  • yolk proteins of insect pests, in order to find potential targets for crop management in developing countries

We are determining tertiary structures and investigating specific protein:protein interactions that occur in macromolecular assemblies. The principal technique we employ is high-resolution, multi-dimensional NMR spectroscopy which we complement with other biophysical techniques, such as circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering and isothermal titration calorimetry.