School of GeoSciences

Teaching staff

The MSc GeoEnergy teaching staff.

Programme Director

Mark Wilkinson

Mark is the Programme Director, so the academic in charge of the degree. He is a geologist, and although his job title is ‘Senior Lecturer in Geological CO2 Storage’, he undertakes research into several GeoEnergy-related topics. These include geological energy storage, for example compressed air energy storage (CAES) and underground hydrogen storage. He also teaches petroleum geology and seismic interpretation on undergraduate courses, and leads field trips to areas such as the North-East Scottish Highlands, and the English Lake District.

His PhD was concerned with the growth of concretions in sandstones, which grow in rocks such as sandstones as they are buried and slowly turn into rocks – sandstones. Concretions are useful in that they preserve a record of the changes inside a rock during burial, but can be a problem when found inside reservoirs for oil or CO2 storage, as they form barriers or baffles to the flow of porefluids. Mark has worked on diagenesis – the changes that occur to sediments as they are buried and turn into rocks – for much of his career.

Mark runs the course ‘Carbon Storage and Monitoring’ which is about the geological side of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS), which runs in Semester 2. He also acts as personal tutor to the GeoEnergy students, meeting with them in Welcome week to help with the selection of the 20 credits of optional courses. There are also meetings once each semester for a formal look at progress and the course in general, including the choice of dissertation topics. Mark also runs the course ‘Project Design and Literature Analysis MSc’ which helps students to write a proposal for their dissertation topic, preparing them for the 60 credit project.

 

Mark Wilkinson- picture

Mark writes: ‘This is me on the Isle of Skye, looking for dinosaurs. Not GeoEnergy but interesting. The white sandstone boulder that I’m kneeling over has a fossil bone in it. It’s only about 5 cm long, so too small to see on the photo. The bone is crushed, so we thought that it might have been hollow (like in a modern bird), so speculated that it might be from a pterosaur, i.e. a flying reptile. These are not actually dinosaurs, but they were around for some of the same time. I’m actually been filmed here, by a TV crew. I appeared on a news item about new dinosaur discoveries on Skye, in a clip that lasted about 15 seconds!  Ourselves and others have made a number of discoveries on Skye over the last few years, earning it the name of Dinosaur Island'.

Programme director: Mark Wilkinson

 

 

 

 

Course Organisers

Stuart Gilfillan

Chancellor's Fellow in Geochemistry.

Stuart Gilfillan

Prof Stuart Haszeldine

Prof Stuart Haszeldine leads the GeoSciences subsurface energy-related research group. He was awarded an OBE by Her Majesty the Queen Elizabeth II for services to  climate change technologies. He teaches the course ‘Subsurface Reservoir Quality'.

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Prof Stuart Haszeldine

Stuart (on the right) teaching students on a field excursion to the Isle of Arran.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris McDermott

Reader in Hydrogeology and Coupled Process Modelling.

Chris McDermott

Margaret Graham

Senior Lecturer in Environmental Geochemistry.

Margaret Graham

Eliza Calder

Senior Lecturer in Volcanology.

Eliza Calder