University Website Programme

Usability testing training

The usability of the University website - how easy it is to use - should be the basis of all our web publishing activity.

This introductory session provides the basic skills needed to begin finding out how your audiences interact with your website.

Timing and structure

The three hour course consists of presentations, demonstrations and practical activities.

After being shown the basics of how to conduct an accompanied surfing session, attendees pair up and test each other's sites.

Why do I need this course?

...the results for our website were illuminating!

Training attendee

This low-tech session has proved an eye opener for web publishers who have attended, giving them the skills to find out how their websites really work for end users.

There is a world of difference between asking people what they think of your site and watching users perform representative tasks.

Web stats are useful, but can only tell you so much. In some cases they're misleading.

Anyone considering a website redevelopment should test with end users first.

Who should attend

Practical exercise was an eye opener.

If you play a leading, active role in the management and development of a University website, the session will be of use to you.

You don't need technical skills to conduct usability testing, only an active interest in meeting the needs of your target audiences.

How to book

This course is run on an on-demand basis. If you have at least 12 members of your school or department interested, we should be able to run a session for you. Speak to your site manager and get in touch.

Website support

Contact details

Participant feedback

Enjoyable and informative it should be a great motivator for all those seriously interested in progressing effective websites!

"I thought I knew all about user acceptance testing, but in fact learnt a great deal."

"The practical demo - when you got an attendee to surf the Website Development Project site - beautifully illustrated the points you were making. It really highlighted the value of the exercise."

"There were useful practical hints, for example how many people to involve, how to treat them, what to say and not to say."

"A very useful benefit was in doing a spot of user testing there and then. That has counted as one of my five users."

"I hadn’t even thought about some of the questions he raised, but now have a page of useful notes to consider. "

I am already lining up my next four volunteers and feel very enthusiastic about producing an improved website.

Further reading

Articles from usability expert Jakob Nielsen:

Do Government Agencies and Non-Profits Get ROI From Usability?

Why You Only Need to Test With 5 Users

First Rule of Usability? Don't Listen to Users

Related links

Usability testing blog posts on Website Programme blog