Veterinary Medical Education Division

Talks

Open events: these are open to staff and students within and outside the Vet School. There is no need to book, just come along.

Description

Speaker: Katie Adam, Postdoctoral Research Fellow (DIAL), Science, Technology and Innovation Studies, University of Edinburgh

Concerns about the future of farm practice, and particularly a shortage of farm animal vets, are neither new nor limited to the UK. My PhD research, conducted between 2011 and 2014 at the Royal Veterinary College, explored these concerns in the context of a shifting business landscape in the veterinary and agricultural sectors. Through mapping veterinary coverage of the cattle population, investigating the factors that influence farm vet retention, and describing how rural veterinary practices are adapting to the changes occurring, Katie aims to provide an evidence base for further discussion and constructive solutions to support sustainable farm animal veterinary services in the UK.

Biography: Katie is an interdisciplinary animal health researcher. She is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow on the ESRC-funded Diagnostic Innovation and Livestock (DIAL) project. 

Katie trained as a veterinary surgeon at the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies in Edinburgh and holds a master’s degree in in Aquatic Medicine from the Norwegian School of Veterinary Science.  She has worked in clinical veterinary practice and as a field epidemiologist, researching endemic animal diseases in Scottish agriculture and aquaculture.  These experiences developed her interest in the social, political and economic impact of livestock disease, and the application of the social sciences to improve animal health.

In 2015, she completed her PhD at the Royal Veterinary College on the future of farm animal practice in the UK in a changing veterinary business landscape.  She then carried out postdoctoral work on vets' and farmers' motivation for disease control on farms as part of the Scottish Government’s Strategic Research Programme, before taking up her current role in December 2017.
  
EligibilityGlobal Academy, Vet undergraduate, Vet postgraduate (PGT & PGR), Vet staff (inc. visitors)
Topic & speaker
Date Tuesday 30-Apr-2019, 13:00 - 14:00
Venue 1.28 First Floor Vet School Teaching Building Easter Bush
Bookings No booking required.
Description

Dr. Melinda Frye is the associate dean of the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine Program and an assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences of Colorado State University (CSU). Melinda has expertise in veterinary medical education. In this talk, she will be giving an overview of CSU developments particularly in business/ financial skills development.

In addition to her work in veterinary medical education, Melinda's research is focused on understanding mechanisms of left ventricular hypertrophy associated with obesity and high fat diet. Her laboratory uses a dietary obese rodent model to study the mechanisms of myocardial remodelling in the absence of insulin resistance or hypertension, representing the covert pathologic changes in otherwise healthy obese humans. Melinda earned her B.S.N. from Linfield College. She earned her D.V.M., M.S., and Ph.D from CSU. She is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  
EligibilityGlobal Academy, Vet undergraduate, Vet postgraduate (PGT & PGR), Vet staff (inc. visitors)
Topic & speaker
Date Tuesday 23-Apr-2019, 13:00 - 14:00
Venue 1.28 First Floor Vet School Teaching Building Easter Bush
Bookings No booking required.
Description

Speaker: Professor Robert Logie, Professor of Human Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Edinburgh

With the dramatic increase in use of digital technologies in everyday working and personal life, there is an increasing reliance on digital memory to store important information rather than to store that information in our biological memory. In recent years, this has been described as cognitive offloading, which can be beneficial for storing details, appointments, and to give access to vast amounts of information on the world-wide web, thereby freeing up brain capacity. However, a major question is whether that brain capacity is used productively in other ways, or if we offload more than is desirable.

This talk will present recent evidence demonstrating that there are major disadvantages in letting our smart phones do our thinking for us, and because digital memory is readily available, this undermines learning. At university, this means that having digital recordings of lectures may lead to much less effective learning, and availability of digital collections of lecture slides gives the illusion that material has been learned when it has not, or learning is delayed until just before exams. The talk will conclude that the learning that is required at university is undermined by making too much lecture material available digitally, and will use the understanding of, and evidence for how human learning and memory actually works to demonstrate how to maximize effective and low-stress learning through use of digital memory as a prompt for   biological recall, not as a means to achieve cognitive offloading.

Biography: Robert H Logie is Professor of Human Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Edinburgh, UK. He obtained his PhD from University College, London, UK, then worked as a post-doctoral researcher in Cambridge, UK. He next moved to the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, UK as a faculty member, becoming Head of Department for five years before moving to the University of Edinburgh in 2004. He has also had adjunct professor positions at the University of Bergen, Norway, and Kyoto University, Japan. His teaching and research interests cover both theoretical and applied approaches to the cognition of human memory. Research projects involve developing cognitive theories of working memory across the adult lifespan, using theories of human cognition to understand the cognitive impairments suffered by people who have suffered brain damage from injury, stroke, neurosurgery or brain disease including dementia, studies of forgetting, and the interaction of human cognition with digital technology both in medical applications and in the everyday use of smartphones. Currently, he leads an international research collaboration involving scientists from Columbia, Missouri, and from Switzerland who disagree with him and each other about theories of how the mind works, but who have agreed to work together to understand a key aspect of the human mind that allows us to keep track of what we are doing every waking moment of our lives. This is known as working memory.
  
EligibilityGlobal Academy, Vet undergraduate, Vet postgraduate (PGT & PGR), Vet staff (inc. visitors)
Topic & speaker
Date Monday 17-Jun-2019, 12:30 - 13:30
Venue 1.28 First Floor Vet School Teaching Building Easter Bush
Bookings No booking required.
Description

Speaker: Diane Daune, SFHEA, RSCN, RGN, RM, PGDE, RNT, BSc (Hons) Nursing, MA in Arts Health

This webinar presentation will outline the use of coaching to enhance student’s work-based learning within the implementation of Collaborative Learning in Practice (CLiP). The presentation will include evaluation results that indicate the collaborative learning in practice module: 

  • is a valid and reliable pedagogy for clinical learning;
  • increases self-confidence and reduces anxiety in students during clinical decision making;
  • supports practice supervision that enables student’s to  learn and safely achieve professional proficiencies and autonomy;
  • contributes to the introducing and ongoing support of student supervision and assessment;
  • contributes to increased placement capacity.

Diane will present remotely via Blackboard Collaborate and the presentation will be screened live in room 1.28 (vet school). The presentation will also be recorded. 

Biography: Diane is a Senior Lecturer in Work-Based Learning at the Faculty of Health and Wellbeing at the University of Central Lancashire. She has more than 17 years of educational leadership that influences and shapes the educational impact and outputs of undergraduate, postgraduate and return to practice nursing programmes. She has a track record of developing, initiating and evaluating programmes with embedded work-based learning experiences, and as a practitioner understands the importance of working with placement providers to enhance students’ work-based learning opportunities.

  
EligibilityGlobal Academy, Vet undergraduate, Vet postgraduate (PGT & PGR), Vet staff (inc. visitors)
Topic & speaker
Date Tuesday 28-May-2019, 13:00 - 14:00
Venue 1.28 First Floor Vet School Teaching Building Easter Bush
Bookings No booking required.
Description

Speaker:  Diva Mukherji, Students’ Association Vice President Education

Join Students’ Association Vice President Education Diva Mukherji for an introduction to diversifying the curriculum, and a discussion of what that means in practice for the Vet School. We’ll be exploring the positive impact a diverse curriculum can have – using feedback from a recent focus group with Vet School students – and the steps staff can take to implement diversity in a vocational curriculum.

 

Bio: Diva is the elected Vice President Education. She studied Sociology and Social Anthropology for the past four years but before she came to Edinburgh she lived in Kolkata, India. Last year, she was the Students’ Association’s Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) Officer. Having co-founded LiberatEd in 2016, she has helped secure a course exploring race relations, develop a paper presented at Learning and Teaching committee about the importance of diversifying the curriculum, and led workshops with students and staff across schools. Moreover, working on the BME attainment gap report has helped her develop a strong understanding of education policy work, and how to work effectively with university stakeholders. As a past class rep and PALS leader, she is knowledgeable of the academic representation systems that exist, and can continue to help streamline the process, so students can be involved in discussions with the University when making decisions. Her experience and passion to improve the lives of students’ makes her confident that with our help, we can successfully advocate for change!

  
EligibilityGlobal Academy, Vet undergraduate, Vet postgraduate (PGT & PGR), Vet staff (inc. visitors)
Topic & speaker
Date Thursday 09-May-2019, 13:00 - 14:00
Venue 1.28 First Floor Vet School Teaching Building Easter Bush
Bookings No booking required.