The Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies
Royal Dick School of Veterinary Studies Bicentenary

Cara Latega: Canada – Class of 2012

Senior Associate Veterinarian

Cara Lategan
Cara Lategan

Why did you choose to study at The University of Edinburgh?

I chose to study in Edinburgh because the vet school has an excellent reputation. The city of Edinburgh also came highly recommended as a place to live. I hadn’t visited Edinburgh before I moved there but I had been to other parts of the UK. It is a small city that has a lot to offer; it is easy to get around and very friendly.

How did the R(D)SVS contribute to your career choices?

Whilst studying at the R(D)SVS I was exposed to all kinds of practice. When I graduated, my plan was to go into equine practice and thanks to the lectures, clinical rotations and EMS opportunities, I was adequately prepared for this. The equine staff at the University were extremely supportive as well.

After graduation personal circumstances altered my field of practice to small animal medicine, but thanks to the great education I had obtained at the R(D)SVS, it was a seamless transition.

What is your present occupation?

At present I work as an associate veterinarian in general practice in Caledon (Ontario, Canada). We are a mixed practice clinic and although I no longer work with large animals, I still have exposure to them day-to-day. I work with dogs, cats, rabbits, pot-bellied pigs and other exotic pets on a daily basis.

Did your EMS placements help you in determining the field of veterinary medicine you wanted to pursue professionally?

My EMS placements were very helpful in guiding me towards the kind of practice I wanted to work in. I was exposed to things that helped me decide what I didn’t want to do. I also spent time spent with vets that were instrumental in informing the kind of vet that I wanted to be.

If you could offer some advice to prospective students what would it be?

Do as much research as you can into the field and spend as much time as you are able with a veterinarian so that you can be sure that this is the career you want to pursue. The Veterinary Medicine program is hard work and the profession, whilst also very rewarding, can present many challenging times throughout your career.

How would you rate the support staff?

All of my experiences with the support staff were very positive. They are always willing to help you with pleasure.

When I graduated, my plan was to go into equine practice and thanks to the lectures, clinical rotations and EMS opportunities, I was adequately prepared for this.