Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research

Aleksandra Gawlik-Lipinski

Project: Longitudinal trends in asthma mortality and uncontrolled asthma, and predictors for asthma-related deaths in children living in England

PhD overview

PhD Title: Longitudinal trends in asthma mortality and uncontrolled asthma, and predictors for asthma-related deaths in children living in England

Funded by: Midlands Asthma and Allergy Research Association (MAARA)

Supervisors: Dr David Lo, Dr Clare Gillies and Professor Jenni Quint

Based at: University of Leicester

Email: agl10@leicester.ac.uk

Aleksandra Gawlik-Lipinski
Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research PhD student, Aleksandra Gawlik-Lipinski

Despite available treatment asthma still kills around 1200 people annually in the UK. The National Report of Asthma Deaths (NRAD) published in 2014 reported that the standard of care delivered to patients with asthma in the UK was poor. Several recommendations were made on how to improve the quality of care.

The purpose of this study is to report the trends in asthma deaths and prevalence of uncontrolled asthma in the community in children over the past 10 years, describe the quality of asthma care benchmarked against recommendations made within the NRAD report, identify risk factors associated with asthma related deaths, and to explore whether there is any evidence of inequalities in care between children from different social and ethnic backgrounds. 

Establishing the risk factors will allow healthcare professionals to better identify children with high-risk asthma, improve their care, and hopefully help to reduce the number of asthma deaths in children.

About me

I’m a PhD student at the University of Leicester with a background as an Advanced Nurse & Paramedic Practitioner with a speciality in respiratory medicine. The driving force behind commencing my PhD was my desire to tackle health inequalities, improve the standard of care our patients are receiving, and ensure we can prevent unnecessary asthma deaths in the future.

Acknowledgements

This work is funded by MAARA and is carried out with the support of the Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research [AUK-AC-2012-01 and AUK-AC-2018-01]