Talbot Rice Gallery

Matthew C. Wilson

Matthew C. Wilson

A Projection of the Colonial Imaginary, 2018, Installation view. Courtesy the Artist.
A Projection of the Colonial Imaginary, 2018, Installation view. Courtesy the Artist.

 

Talbot Rice Projects is delighted to announce Matthew C. Wilson as the artist selected from this year’s Open Call. With the help of artist Lucy Skaer, Wilson was chosen by Talbot Rice curators from over 100 applications received.

Rooted in process and ongoing, intensive research, Matthew's practice combines interrelated video and sculpture in installations. His proposed project has its roots in a 2016 research trip to Scotland that included visits to the archaeological excavations at the Neolithic Ness of Brodgar in Orkney, sites near Edinburgh related to the history of geology and the industrial revolution, and the University of Edinburgh's collections in archeology  and geology, among others. We are looking forward to working with Matthew to build on these existing interests and connections, whilst also watching the diverse and unforeseen directions his project will take upon opening the doors to the vast resources of the University of Edinburgh to him.

“Events initiated in the past persist in the present, where we can feel their inertia pushing into the future. I seek obscure aspects of history which structure, and remain subtly, but potently active today. Each of my projects makes connections between seemingly separate domains, which nonetheless share a set of coordinates--together suggesting alternative modes of meaning." -- Matthew C. Wilson.

 

Matthew C. Wilson (b. 1982, North Carolina, USA) completed an MFA in Visual Arts at Columbia University before taking part in the Whitney Independent Study Program in New York. Wilson has has been awarded numerous fellowships and residencies, most recently the Jan van Eyck Academie in Maastricht, NL. As part of an Artistic Research Residency at Tabakalera in San Sebastián, ES, he is currently developing a public program that takes its structure from the non-visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum.

website