Undergraduate study - 2021 entry

Degree Programme Specification 2020/2021

Bachelor of Nursing with Honours

To give you an idea of what to expect from this programme, we publish the latest available information. This information is created when new programmes are established and is only updated periodically as programmes are formally reviewed. It is therefore only accurate on the date of last revision.
Awarding institution: The University of Edinburgh
Teaching institution: The University of Edinburgh
Programme accredited by: Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC)
Final award: Bachelor with Honours
Programme title: Nursing
UCAS code: B700
Relevant QAA subject benchmarking group(s): School QAA Committee
Postholder with overall responsibility for QA: Undergraduate Programme Director: Jennifer Tocher Postholder with overall responsibility for QA: Jillian Taylor
Date of production/revision: Produced for May 2012 to be revised May 2016

External summary

The four year Undergraduate Programme leads to the award of the degree Bachelor of Nursing with Honours and eligibility to register as an adult nurse with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) in the United Kingdom.  The aim of the programme is to produce a graduate nurse who reflects the philosophy, values and competency skills required by the Nursing and Midwifery Council’s (NMC) Standards (2010) and graduate attributes which reflect the University's aim to develop a high quality academic and professional nurse with critical, analytical skills for making a substantial contribution to the advancement of knowledge and practice.

Through the programme, which admits 35 students per year and has a very student centred approach to student learning, nursing students are enabled to demonstrate overt professional competence in providing quality care and fitness to practise which ensures the safety of patients and the public.

Graduates of the University of Edinburgh’s Nursing Studies Bachelor of Nursing with Honours programme recognise the dynamic nature of the health services and the differing needs of the communities they serve and demonstrate a commitment to meeting these changing needs equating with fitness for purpose.

Furthermore, from the quality and excellence of the Bachelor of Nursing with Honours programme undertaken, the graduates will demonstrate a commitment to lifelong learning and the provision of nursing of the highest standard equating with fitness for award and professional standing.

The educational preparation of the University of Edinburgh’s Bachelor of Nursing with Honours programme consistently produces graduates of a very high calibre in professional, clinical, academic, analytical and leadership skills.

Educational aims of programme

The aim of the programme is to provide learning environments in the University, hospital and community settings, in which students, as individuals, are able to develop their professional competencies and intellectual skills in equal measure and, by so doing, produce graduate nurses who:

  • Are competent, critically aware, effective  and safe practitioners.
  • Can identify implications of research for nursing practice.
  • Can use a scholarly approach to study particular areas of nursing in depth.
  • Can use research knowledge and skills in nursing practice and in the advancement of nursing knowledge.
  • Possess an appropriate level of knowledge about concepts of health and related research so that they can participate in health promotion and health education activities in both community and institutional settings.
  • Can participate in the examination and discussion of issues related to health care in the socio-political arena.
  • Can collaborate constructively with other professionals involved in the delivery of health care.
  • Are sensitive to the attitudes, cultural values, beliefs and needs of others.
  • Are aware of and participate in their own development.
  • Are aware of their own competencies and limitations, and are able to use appropriate channels of referrals.
  • Possess a spirit of enquiry and openness to change.
  • Develop the ethos of lifelong learning.
  • Practise according to the NMC Code (2008).
  • Have acquired the essential skills of teamwork and leadership.
  • Communicate effectively both orally and in writing.
  • Have the ability to make formal presentations.
  • Know how to seek and respond to guidance.
  • Plan and manage their time effectively.
  • Access relevant literature and research using bibliographic sources, data bases and the internet effectively.
  • Have experience of and competence in word processing, virtual learning environments and information technology.
  • Have developed the ability to interpret and evaluate a wide range of numerical data.

Programme outcomes: Knowledge and understanding

The Bachelor of Nursing with Honours programme fully realises the integration of theory and clinical practice in preparing students to meet the competence requirements of adult nursing through a 50%:50% ratio of taught theory and clinical experience.

The prescribed, core courses and optional honours courses in the four years of the programme have specific learning outcomes which contribute to achieving the NMC required competence outcomes by the end of the programme for the award of the degree and registration as a nurse. Outlined here are the core competencies required.

Graduates must act first and foremost to care for and safeguard the public. They must practise autonomously and be responsible and accountable for safe, compassionate, person centred, evidence-based nursing that respects and maintains dignity and human rights.  

Graduates must show professionalism and integrity and work within recognised professional, ethical and legal frameworks. They must work in partnership with other health and social care professionals and agencies, service users, their carers and families in all settings, including the community, ensuring that decisions about care are shared.

Graduate nurses must also be able at all times to promote the rights, choices and wishes of all adults and, where appropriate, children and young people, paying particular attention to equality, diversity and the needs of an ageing population. They must be able to work in partnership to address people’s needs in all healthcare settings.

Graduates:

  • Are able to practise with confidence according to The code: Standards of conduct, performance and ethics for nurses and midwives (NMC 2008), and within other recognised ethical and legal frameworks.
  • Are able to recognise and address ethical challenges relating to people’s choices and decision-making about their care, and act within the law to help them and their families and carers to find acceptable solutions.
  • Understand and apply current legislation to all service users, paying special attention to the protection of vulnerable people, including those with complex needs arising from ageing, cognitive impairment, long-term conditions and those approaching the end of life.
  • Can practise in a holistic, non-judgmental, caring and sensitive manner that avoids assumptions, supports social inclusion, recognises and respects individual choice, and acknowledges diversity. Where necessary, they challenge inequality, discrimination and exclusion from access to care.
  • Are able to support and promote the health, wellbeing, rights and dignity of people, groups, communities and populations. These include people whose lives are affected by ill health, disability, ageing, death and dying. Nurses must understand how to influence public health.
  • Work in partnership with service users, carers, families, groups, communities and organisations. They manage risk, and promote health and wellbeing while aiming to empower choices that promote self-care and safety.
  • Fully understand the nurse’s various roles, responsibilities and functions, and have the capacity to adapt their practice to meet the changing needs of people, groups, communities and populations.
  • Understand the roles and responsibilities of other health and social care professionals and seek to work with them collaboratively for the benefit of all who need care.
  • Are responsible and accountable for keeping their knowledge and skills up to date through continuing professional development. They aim to improve their performance and enhance the safety and quality of care through evaluation, supervision and appraisal.
  • Practise independently, recognising the limits of their competence and knowledge. They reflect on these limits and seek advice from, or refer to, other professionals where necessary.
  • Can use their professional knowledge and skills to identify needs and to plan, implement and co-ordinate the delivery of appropriate nursing care to individuals and groups in both community and institutional settings.

Programme outcomes: Graduate attributes - Skills and abilities in research and enquiry

Within Nursing Studies, research is embedded within all educational and practice based activities.  Research is the foundation from which evidence based practice develops and thus ensures the ideals of best practice. The spirit of inquiry is fostered within the subject area and the nature of evidence, and the validity and reliability of current clinical evidence, are analysed.  The ethos of the subject area is that it is not sufficient to have a sound research basis to practice but it is necessary for graduate practitioners of the programme to develop critical inquiry.  The students develop new skills and knowledge through a competency-based education programme and, at Honours level, have opportunities to expand their research expertise. The aim is to produce a graduate nurse with a sound research basis for practice, who can utilise a wide range of academic methods of enquiry enhancing her / his development as a competent practitioner eligible for entry to the professional register and to develop into a lifelong learner

Accordingly the aim is to produce graduate nurses who demonstrate the ability to:

  • Critically identify, define, conceptualise and analyse complex professional problems and issues.
  • Interpret and provide solutions to problems and issues, exercising diagnostic reasoning and scholarship.
  • Appreciate the value of evidence in practice.
  • Understand and appraise research.
  • Synthesise information and make judgements where information comes from a range of sources.
  • Identify the implications of research for nursing practice.
  • Apply relevant theory and research findings to nursing work, and identify areas for further investigation.
  • Use a scholarly approach to study particular areas of nursing in depth.
  • Use research knowledge and skills in nursing practice and in the advancement of nursing knowledge.
  • Access relevant literature and research using bibliographic sources, data bases and the internet effectively.
  • Interpret and evaluate a wide range of numerical data such as some statistics.
  • Reflect the University's aim to provide a high quality education in a broad range of academic and professional subjects and to emphasise the development of appropriate critical, analytical, communication and practical skills in a setting where staff are making a substantial contribution to the advancement of knowledge.

Programme outcomes: Graduate attributes - Skills and abilities in personal and intellectual autonomy

The programme seeks to produce students who are able to:

  • Demonstrate awareness of and participate in their own personal and professional development, learning from experience, through supervision, feedback, reflection and evaluation.
  • Plan, assess and identify their own learning needs.
  • Exercise awareness of their own competencies and limitations, and are able to use appropriate channels of referrals.
  • Demonstrate effective study skills, individually and in groups, and awareness of their own personal learning style.
  • Demonstrate the ability to critically review knowledge, skills and practice within nursing.
  • Monitor and evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency with which nursing care is being delivered.
  • Facilitate others to develop their competence, using a range of professional and personal development skills.

Programme outcomes: Graduate attributes - Skills and abilities in communication

Graduates of the Bachelor of Nursing with Honours programme will have attained excellent communication and interpersonal skills. Their communications must always be safe, effective, compassionate and respectful. They must communicate effectively using a wide range of strategies and interventions including the effective use of communication technologies. Where people have a disability, nurses must be able to work with service users and others to obtain the information needed to make reasonable adjustments that promote optimum health and enable equal access to services.

Graduates must demonstrate the ability to listen with empathy. They must be able to respond warmly and positively to people of all ages who may be anxious, distressed, or facing problems with their health and wellbeing.

Graduates will have honed their skills in the following ways to:

  • Build partnerships and therapeutic relationships through safe, effective and non-discriminatory communication, taking account of individual differences, capabilities and needs.
  • Use a range of communication skills and technologies to support person centred care and enhance quality and safety.
  • Ensure that people receive all the information that they need in a language and manner that allows them to make informed choices and share decision making, and to recognise when language interpretation or other communication support is needed and know how to obtain it.
  • Use the full range of communication methods, including verbal, non-verbal and written, to acquire, interpret and record their knowledge and understanding of people’s needs.
  • Be aware of their own values and beliefs and the impact this may have on their communication with others.
  • Take account of the many different ways in which people communicate and how these may be influenced by ill health, disability and other factors, and be able to recognise and respond effectively when a person finds it hard to communicate.
  • Promote the concept, knowledge and practice of self-care with people with acute and long-term conditions, using a range of communication skills and strategies.
  • Recognise when people are anxious or in distress and respond effectively, using therapeutic principles, to promote their wellbeing, manage personal safety and resolve conflict.
  • Use effective communication strategies and negotiation techniques to achieve best outcomes, respecting the dignity and human rights of all concerned, and to know when to consult a third party and make referrals for advocacy, mediation or arbitration.
  • Use therapeutic principles to engage, maintain and, where appropriate, disengage from professional caring relationships, and must always respect professional boundaries.
  • Take every opportunity to encourage health-promoting behaviour through education, role modelling and effective communication.
  • Maintain accurate, clear and complete records, including the use of electronic formats, using appropriate and plain language.
  • Respect individual rights to confidentiality and keep information secure and confidential in accordance with the law and relevant ethical and regulatory frameworks, taking account of local protocols, and to actively share personal information with others when the interests of safety and protection override the need for confidentiality.

Programme outcomes: Graduate attributes - Skills and abilities in personal effectiveness

The Bachelor of Nursing with Honours programme recruits students of high academic and personal calibre.  Graduates are professionally accountable and use clinical governance processes to maintain and improve nursing practice and standards of healthcare.

Graduates must be able to provide leadership in managing adult nursing care, understand and coordinate inter-professional care when needed, and liaise with specialist teams. They must be adaptable and flexible, and able to take the lead in responding to the needs of people of all ages in a variety of circumstances, including situations where immediate or urgent care is needed. Graduates must recognise their leadership role in disaster management, major incidents and public health emergencies, and respond appropriately according to their levels of competence.

Graduates must be able to respond autonomously and confidently to planned and uncertain situations, managing themselves and others effectively. They must create and maximise opportunities to improve services. Graduates must also demonstrate the potential to develop further management and leadership skills.

By the end of the programme individuals have personal skills of:

  • Acting as change agents and providing leadership through quality improvement and service development to enhance people’s wellbeing and experiences of healthcare.
  • Systematically evaluating care and ensuring that they and others use the findings to help to improve people’s experience, improve the care outcomes and shape future services.
  • Identifying priorities and managing time and resources effectively to ensure that the quality of care is maintained or enhanced.
  • Self-awareness to recognise how their own values, principles and assumptions may affect their practice.
  • Working independently as well as in teams.
  • Taking the lead in coordinating, delegating and supervising care safely, managing risk and remaining accountable for the care given.
  • Working effectively across professional and agency boundaries, actively involving and respecting others’ contributions to integrated person centred care.
  • Knowing when and how to communicate with and refer to other professionals and agencies in order to respect the choices of service users and others, to promote shared decision making, to deliver positive outcomes and to coordinate smooth, effective transition within and between services and agencies.

Programme outcomes: Technical/practical skills

Graduates are expected to practise autonomously, compassionately, skilfully and safely, and must maintain dignity and promote health and wellbeing. They must assess and meet the full range of essential physical and mental health needs of people of all ages who come into their care. Where necessary they must be able to provide safe and effective immediate care to all people prior to accessing or referring to specialist services irrespective of their field of practice.

All graduates must also meet more complex and coexisting needs for people in the adult nursing field of practice, in any setting including hospital, community and at home. All practice is informed by the best available evidence and must comply with local and national guidelines. Decision-making must be shared with service users, carers and families and informed by critical analysis of a full range of possible interventions, including the use of contemporary technology.

All graduates must understand how behaviour, culture, socioeconomic and other factors, in the care environment and its location, can affect health, illness, health outcomes and public health priorities and take this into account in planning and delivering care.

Graduate nurses must be able to carry out accurate assessment of people of all ages using appropriate history taking, diagnostic and decision-making skills. They must be able to provide effective care for service users and others in all settings. They must have in-depth understanding of and competence in medical and surgical nursing to respond to adults’ full range of health and dependency needs. They must be able to deliver care to meet essential and complex physical and mental health needs.

On completion of the programme all graduates:

  • Use up-to-date knowledge and evidence to assess, plan, deliver and evaluate care, communicate findings, influence change and promote health and best practice. They make person centred, evidence-based judgments and decisions, in partnership with others involved in the care process, to ensure high quality care.
  • Are able to recognise when the complexity of clinical decisions requires specialist knowledge and expertise, and consult or refer accordingly.
  • Are able to recognise and respond to the needs of all people who come into their care including babies, children and young people, pregnant and postnatal women, people with mental health problems, people with physical disabilities, people with learning disabilities, older people, and people with long term problems such as cognitive impairment.
  • Possess a broad knowledge of the structure and functions of the human body, and other relevant knowledge from the life, behavioural and social sciences as applied to health, ill health, disability, ageing and death.
  • Have an in-depth knowledge of common physical and mental health problems and treatments in their own field of practice, including co-morbidity and physiological and psychological vulnerability.
  • Carry out comprehensive, systematic nursing assessments that take account of relevant physical, social, cultural, psychological, spiritual, genetic and environmental factors, in partnership with service users and others through interaction, observation and measurement.
  • Safely use a range of diagnostic skills, employing appropriate technology, to assess the needs of service users.
  • Ascertain and respond to the physical, social and psychological needs of people, groups and communities.
  • Assess, plan, deliver and evaluate safe, competent, person centred care in partnership with people, groups and communities, paying special attention to changing health needs during different life stages, including progressive illness and death, loss and bereavement.
  • Safely use invasive and non-invasive procedures, medical devices, and current technological and pharmacological interventions, where relevant, in medical and surgical nursing practice, providing information and taking account of individual needs and preferences.
  • Recognise and respond to the changing needs of adults, families and carers during end of life care. They must be aware of how treatment goals and service users’ choices may change at different stages of progressive illness, loss and bereavement.
  • Understand public health principles, priorities and practice in order to recognise and respond to the major causes and social determinants of health, illness and health inequalities.
  • Use a range of information and data to assess the needs of people, groups, communities and populations, and work to improve health, wellbeing and experiences of healthcare; secure equal access to health screening, health promotion and healthcare; and promote social inclusion.
  • Practise safely by being aware of the correct use, limitations and hazards of common interventions, including nursing activities, treatments, and the use of medical devices and equipment.
  • Be able to evaluate their use, report any concerns promptly through appropriate channels and modify care where necessary to maintain safety. They must contribute to the collection of local and national data and formulation of policy on risks, hazards and adverse outcomes.
  • Recognise the early signs of illness in people of all ages.
  • Be able to recognise and interpret signs of normal and deteriorating mental and physical health and respond promptly to maintain or improve the health and comfort of the service user, acting to keep them and others safe.
  • Make accurate assessments and start appropriate and timely management of those who are acutely ill, at risk of clinical deterioration, or require emergency care.
  • Understand the normal physiological and psychological processes of pregnancy and childbirth. They must work with the midwife and other professionals and agencies to provide basic nursing care to pregnant women and families during pregnancy and after childbirth. They must be able to respond safely and effectively in an emergency to safeguard the health of mother and baby.
  • Provide educational support, facilitation skills and therapeutic nursing interventions to optimise health and wellbeing. They must promote self-care and management whenever possible, helping people to make choices about their healthcare needs, involving families and carers where appropriate, to maximise their ability to care for themselves.
  • Work in partnership with people who have long-term conditions that require medical or surgical nursing, and their families and carers, to provide therapeutic nursing interventions, optimise health and wellbeing, facilitate choice and maximise self-care and self-management.
  • Be able to recognise when a person is at risk and in need of extra support and protection and take reasonable steps to protect them from abuse.
  • Evaluate their care to improve clinical decision-making, quality and outcomes, using a range of methods, amending the plan of care, where necessary, and communicating changes to others.
  • Demonstrate overtly that the patient/client is the focus of nursing and that the intrinsic value and uniqueness of the person is central to professional nursing practice.
  • Have become safe, reflective, competent, caring and accountable practitioners who can assume responsibilities necessary for public protection. As professionals working in health care, graduates will have the required knowledge, understanding and skills and the ability to apply the principles and concepts expected of professionals working in health care working both autonomously and collaboratively within the NMC Code (2008).
  • Have a high level of intellectual development, professional development and the acquisition of skills necessary for the dynamic world of nursing and health care.

Programme structure and features

The Bachelor of Nursing with Honours programme leading to eligibility to register as an adult nurse with the NMC fully realises the integration of theory and practice through a 50:50 ratio of taught theory and clinical experience.  Students can expect a very student centred experience as only 35 students are recruited to the programme annually.  When working in the clinical environments students can expect to work with a registered nurse prepared to mentor students in that specific clinical environment.

There are prescribed core courses and a choice of courses in years 1, 3 and 4 of the programme. There is a choice of outside courses in year 1 and a choice of Honours options in years 3 and 4.  Students should expect to undertake 6117.5 hours of study for the award of the degree.

Year 1 of the programme introduces concepts relevant to adult nursing and the students work towards achieving competence relevant to both the generic and field specific competencies to meet progression point one of the NMC Standards (2010).  Students undertake taught classes in the University of Edinburgh and clinical experience in NHS Lothian or Borders.  In year 2 the students further develop their knowledge and skills to develop generic and field specific competencies through the spiral curriculum.  By the end of year 2 the students work increasingly more autonomously in the clinical and academic environment to meet progression point two.   In years three and four the courses are designed to further develop adult nursing knowledge and competencies and fully integrate theory and practice. The Honours options and Honours dissertation allow the students to pursue in-depth critical analyses of areas relevant to adult nursing care that are of particular and personal interest and concern to the student. Self-directed learning skills are further refined in order to prepare students as lifelong learners.

All courses and clinical experience are reviewed on an ongoing basis and at the end of the academic year, by students, staff teaching on the course, and external examiners. Feedback is sought from students and mentors in each clinical placement. A Course Monitoring Form is completed by the Course Organisers in line with the College of Humanities in Social Science Quality Assurance procedure and used as the basis for course development. The programme is subject to annual review by the external professional body Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). A periodic teaching programme review (TPR) is undertaken every five years by the University of Edinburgh for quality assurance and programme enhancement. The full evaluation is brought to the Annual Nursing Studies Meeting where evaluation and audit outcomes of all the courses and the programme are scrutinised and appropriate aspects of curriculum development planned for future development.

Degree Programme Table for the Bachelor of Nursing with Honours and Ordinary degree with progression though the programme

Year of Study

Level

Credit Points

Progression through the Programme

Year 1

Healthy Communities 1 P

 

8

20

A pass in academic assessment and practice performance assessment.

 

Nursing Life Sciences P

 

8

40

A pass in academic and practice performance assessment.

Evidence and Research: Avenues of Inquiry P

 

8

10

A pass in academic assessment and practice performance assessment.

Professionalism 1 (Introduction to Professionalism) P

 

8

10

A pass in academic assessment and practice performance assessment

Two Outside course(s)

 

7/8

40

A pass in academic assessment. May be carried into year 2 if needed.

Achievement of Progression Point 1

Year 2

Healthy Communities 2 P

 

8

20

A pass in academic and practice performance assessment. #

 

Nursing Care and Decision Making  P

 

8

40

A pass in academic and practice performance assessment. #

Evidence and Research: Approaches to Design and Methods P

 

8

20

A pass in academic and practice performance assessment.

Mental Health and Wellbeing P

 

8

20

A pass in academic and practice performance assessment.

Professionalism 2 (Professionals in health care – team working) P

 

8

20

A pass in academic and practice performance assessment. #

Achievement of Progression Point 2

Year 3 (Bachelor of Nursing with Honours)

Management of Transitions – The Care of the Older Person P

 

10

20

A pass in academic and practice performance assessment.

Professionalism 3 (Professional judgement and clinical decision making) P

10

20

A pass in academic and practice performance assessment.

Research Methods for Nursing  

 

10

20

A pass in academic and practice performance assessment.

Honours Options x 3*

 

 

10

60

A pass in academic (and practice performance assessment as relevant to the option taken).

Achievement of Progression Point 3

Year 3 (Bachelor of Nursing Ordinary)

Management of Transitions – The Care of the Older Person P

10

20

A pass in academic and practice performance assessment.

Professionalism 3 (Professional judgement and clinical decision making) P

10

20

A pass in academic and practice performance assessment.

Professionalism 4 (Professionals Working in Organisations – Clinical Governance) P

10

40

A pass in academic and practice performance assessment.

Specialist Options x 2

10

40

A pass in academic (and practice performance assessment as relevant to the option taken)

Achievement of Entry to the Register

Year 4 (Bachelor of Nursing with Honours)

Professionalism 4 (Professionals Working in Organisations – Clinical Governance) P

10

40

A pass in academic and practice performance assessment.

Honours Options x 2*

10

40

A pass in academic (and practice performance assessment as relevant to the option taken)

Honours Dissertation

10

40

A pass in academic and practice performance assessment.

Achievement of Entry to the Register

P – Required Professional Courses

# Entry to Honours

* One outside honours course is permitted in the programme if relevant to the programme outcomes

To be eligible to enter honours in year 3, students must successfully complete the first two years of the programme and fulfil a or b below (or in very exceptional circumstances only c or d below):

Ensure entry by achieving grade 50 percent at the first attempt and in the second year of the programme in either:

a) Nursing Care and Decision Making AND Ensure a pass in the Ongoing Achievement Record for the required clinical practice components of the programme

OR

b) Healthy Communities 2 AND Professionalism 2 (Professionals in health care – team working) AND Ensure a pass in the Ongoing Achievement Record for the required clinical practice components of the programme

OR

c) Gain entry in terms of the particular conditions notified to students by the school concerned at the beginning of the second year

OR

d) Exceptionally be granted exemption from these qualifications by the Head of School

Students must have demonstrated satisfactory clinical progress achieving the progression point 2 criteria in accordance with the NMC requirements pre-registration standards 2010. Award of Degree

To be awarded the Bachelor of Nursing with Honours degree students must pass at least 160 credits of the 240 credits (eight 20 credit units of assessment of the twelve 20 credit units) of assessment in honours years 3 and 4 in order to graduate. The honours courses / units passed must include the required professional courses shown by P.

A student may take a maximum of one 20 credit honours course relating to health in other subject areas with the agreement of their Personal Tutor if this is congruent with the aims of the Bachelor of Nursing with Honours programme.

A student who fails an Honours course, for which a pass is required for professional registration, will be required to re-sit the examination and / or resubmit the course work. However, the first (fail) mark will be recorded in the profile for the degree classification. Should the work still fail to achieve a pass at resubmission, an oral examination will be scheduled before the end of the academic session. If the student, orally assessed against the specific criteria, still fails to satisfy the examiners, professional registration will not be possible. The student will be ineligible for the degree of Bachelor of Nursing with Honours but may be eligible for the award of the degree of Bachelor of Arts (Health Studies) with Honours or Bachelor of Arts (Health Studies). If the requirements are met for the award of the Bachelor of Nursing Ordinary degree the student will be eligible for this award.

To be awarded the Bachelor of Nursing Ordinary degree students must pass at least 80 credits of the 120 credits (four 20 credit units of assessment of the six 20 credit units) of assessment in year 3 in order to graduate. The courses/units passed must include the required professional courses shown by P.

A student may take a maximum of one 20 credit level 10 course relating to health in other subject areas with the agreement of their Personal Tutor if this is congruent with the aims of the Bachelor of Nursing programme.

A student who fails a year 3 course, for which a pass is required for professional registration, will be required to re-sit the examination and/or resubmit the course work. However, the first (fail) mark will be recorded in the profile for the degree. Should the work still fail to achieve a pass at resubmission, an oral examination will be scheduled before the end of the academic session. If the student, orally assessed against the specific criteria, still fails to satisfy the examiners, professional registration will not be possible. The student will be ineligible for the degree of Bachelor of Nursing Ordinary degree but may be eligible for the award of the degree of Bachelor of Arts (Health Studies).

Honours Classification

The final classification of the Honours years 3 & 4 follow very specific rules laid down by the College of Humanities and Social Science. In Nursing Studies the classification is based on 12 units of assessment, 6 in year 3 and 6 in year 4. Students may obtain further information from the following website:

http://www.drps.ed.ac.uk

Teaching and learning methods and strategies

The curriculum utilises a variety of learning experiences and from year 1 students are introduced to problem based learning and reflective practice. The development of teaching and learning skills for the student is crucial for the development of a sound basis for professional practice. Integration of knowledge and lifelong learning is a key part of the programme.

Teaching strategies – examples of methods are:

  • Group and on-line discussion
  • Tutorials
  • Reflective diaries
  • Problem based learning/scenario based learning
  • Skills based group work
  • Context based teaching
  • Seminars
  • Team teaching
  • Experiential role play
  • Computer assisted learning
  • Lectures
  • E-portfolios
  • Wikis
  • Blogs
  • Practicals

Assessment methods and strategies

The curriculum utilises a variety of assessment methods and strategies in line with the teaching and learning strategies employed. The feedback both given to students about their assessments and from students about their learning experience is very important and we use this information to help shape our assessment methods and strategies.

Assessment Methods and Strategies- examples are:

  • Presentations
  • Reflective diaries
  • Examinations
  • Formative assessment
  • Course papers
  • Posters
  • Group work
  • Clinical assessment
  • Assessment choice
  • Critical appraisal
  • Dissertation

Summative Assessment over the 4 years

University examinations contributing to the final classification/award are held at the end of each year of study. Course work and assessments which students undertake to contribute towards their degree are weighted such that early assessments contribute relatively little towards the final classification of the degree. This is in order to give students the opportunity of being assessed under examination hall conditions developing the necessary skills for subsequent years towards the degree.

The assessment in the programme is as follows:

Programme Assessment Strategy

Year 1

Nursing Life Sciences p

Multimedia presentation

20%

Class exam

10%

Course paper

20%

Degree examination

50%

Practice performance assessment

Pass

Healthy Communities 1 p

Course paper

100%

Practice performance assessment

Pass

Evidence and Research: Avenues of Inquiry p

Course paper

100%

Practice performance assessment

Pass

Professionalism 1 (Introduction to Professionalism) p

Degree examination

100%

Practice performance assessment

Pass

Outside Course(s) (assessment depends on course taken)

Assessment performance must meet requirements for progression point 1

Year 2

Nursing Care and Decision Making p

Multimedia presentation

20%

Class exam

10%

Course paper

20%

Degree examination

50%

Practice performance assessment

Pass

Healthy Communities 2 p

Course paper assessment –community profile

100%

Practice performance assessment

Pass

Mental Health and Wellbeing p

Course paper

100%

Practice performance assessment

Pass

Professionalism 2 (Professionals in health care – team working) p

Course paper

100%

OR

Degree examination

100%

Practice performance assessment

Pass

Evidence and Research: Approaches to Design and Methods p

Course paper

80%

Oral / Visual Presentation

20%

Practice performance assessment

Pass

Assessment performance must meet requirements for progression point 2

Progression to Honours is based on the assessments of Year 2 as detailed earlier. Classification of the degree is based on the assessment in the years 3 and 4.

Year 3 (Bachelor of Nursing with Honours)

Professionalism 3 (Professional judgement and clinical decision making) p

Course paper

100%

Practice performance assessment

Pass

Management of Transitions – The Care of the Older Person p

Course Paper

100%

Practice performance assessment

Pass

Research Methods for Nursing

Course paper

100%

Practice performance assessment

Pass

Honours Option 1

Course paper / Examination

100%

Practice performance assessment as relevant to the option

Honours Option 2

Course paper / Examination

100%

Honours Option 3

Course paper / Examination

100%

Pass

Assessment performance must meet requirements for progression point 3

Year 3 (Bachelor of Nursing Ordinary)

Professionalism 3 (Professional judgement and clinical decision making) p

Course paper

100%

Practice performance assessment

Pass

Professionalism 4 (Professionals Working in Organisations – Clinical Governance) p

Course paper

50%

Degree Examination

50%

Management of Transitions – The Care of the Older Person p

Course Paper

100%

Practice performance assessment

Pass

Specialist Option 1

Course paper / Examination

100%

Practice performance assessment as relevant to the option

Honours Option 2

Course paper / Examination

100%

Practice performance assessment as relevant to the option

Assessment performance must meet requirements for entry to the register

Year 4 (Bachelor of Nursing with Honours)

Professionalism 4 (Professionals Working in Organisations – Clinical Governance) p

Course paper

50%

Degree Examination

50%

Honours Option 4

Course paper / Examination

100%

Honours Option 5

Course paper / Examination

100%

Honours Dissertation

100%

Assessment performance must meet requirements for entry to the register

Examples of Specialist / Honours Options

  • Adult Endocrine Nursing
  • Cancer Care
  • Care and Control
  • Caring and Emotional Work in Nursing
  • Care of the Older Person
  • Complementary Therapies in Nursing
  • Critical Care Nursing
  • Ethical legal and social issues in child health [or Rights of the Child in Health Care]
  • Ethics in Health Care
  • Gastrointestinal Nursing
  • Health Promotion Practice
  • Issues and Developments in the Management of Pain
  • Living with Long Term Conditions
  • Loss and Death
  • Transplantation Nursing

Specialist / Honours options in development for 2016

  • Community Nursing
  • Person Centred Care

Career opportunities

The employment prospects for a graduate nurse are excellent and opportunities are wide-ranging. The majority of students who complete a nursing degree at the University of Edinburgh go on to practice as nurses.

Ultimately, many graduates undertake further professional education which allows them to become a specialist in their chosen clinical areas. Some go on to work overseas in both developed and developing countries.

Other items

The Clinical Elective placement

The clinical elective experience is seen as an integral and important part of the course that instils a high degree of personal responsibility on the part of the student. Students working towards the Bachelor of Nursing with Honours programme have a four week period allocated at the end of the third year of the programme for a clinical elective placement. This gives them the opportunity to obtain experience in an area of particular interest and to further develop their capacity for self-direction. Students obtain placements nationally or internationally. In close consultation with staff, students identify a suitable area for the placement and the learning outcomes to be achieved. The students are allocated a facilitator with whom they discuss their ideas, preparatory work, plans and learning outcomes. The value of these individual, elective experiences cannot be overstated in terms of the development of self-management skills and personal development.

Aims

Theoretical:

  • To enable students to further develop a self-directed approach to personal and professional development and lifelong learning skills
  • To promote development of greater autonomy and responsibility in directing and controlling the student’s own learning
  • To enable students to focus on an area of care in which they have a particular interest, such as a specialised aspect of care

Practice

  • To enable students to contrast care delivery in different cultures or localities dependent on the chosen setting
To foster the development of core skills and professional attributes essential for nursing practice, including adaptability, flexibility, self-evaluation and an understanding of and respect for different health beliefs and care contexts