Undergraduate study - 2020 entry

Degree Programme Specification 2019/2020

MA (Hons) in Physical Education

To give you an idea of what to expect from this programme, we publish the latest available information. This information is created when new programmes are established and is only updated periodically as programmes are formally reviewed. It is therefore only accurate on the date of last revision.
Awarding institution: The University of Edinburgh
Teaching institution: The University of Edinburgh (Moray House School of Education)
Programme accredited by: General Teaching Council for Scotland (Subject to approval in August 2013)
Final award: MA (Hons) Physical Education 
Programme title: MA (Hons) Physical Education
UCAS code: XC61
Relevant QAA subject benchmarking group(s): The Standard for Initial Teacher Education (2007) [This is likely to be revised and updated in line with the new professional standards published by the GTCS in 2012.]
Postholder with overall responsibility for QA: Andrew Horrell (subject to appointment)
Date of production/revision: March 2014

External summary

The new four year MA (Hons) Physical Education programme aims to prepare students to confidently teach physical education, health and well-being and other related interventions associated with Curriculum for Excellence across the 3-18 age range. As a result of critical engagement with specialist academic discourse and placement in schools, graduates from the programme will have the professional knowledge, skills and values necessary to meet the policy-informed twenty-first century ambitions of teachers in Scotland. As such, graduates will enter the profession with the creative capabilities necessary to constructively contribute to curriculum development and to school-based reviews of how innovative pedagogical and assessment practices can further enhance learning. In so doing, graduates will also be able to play a leading role in raising attainment, as well as contributing to the wider ethos of the school and community. In addition, the programme through its commitment to high levels of disciplinary knowledge and research inquiry promotes the importance of teachers’ active learning as part of career-long professional development.

Educational aims of programme

The new four year MA (Hons) Physical Education programme aims to prepare students to confidently teach physical education, health and well-being and other related interventions associated with Curriculum for Excellence across the 3-18 age range. As a result of critical engagement with specialist academic discourse and placement in schools, graduates from the programme will have the professional knowledge, skills and values necessary to meet the policy-informed twenty-first century ambitions of teachers in Scotland. As such, graduates will enter the profession with the creative capabilities necessary to constructively contribute to curriculum development and to school-based reviews of how innovative pedagogical and assessment practices can further enhance learning. In so doing, graduates will also be able to play a leading role in raising attainment, as well as contributing to the wider ethos of the school and community. In addition, the programme through its commitment to high levels of disciplinary knowledge and research inquiry promotes the importance of teachers’ active learning as part of career-long professional development.

Programme outcomes: Knowledge and understanding

The learning outcomes for the Programme are at level 8 in years one and two and at level 10 in years three and four. They are supplemented by the requirements of the Standard for Provisional Registration (SPR) created by the General Teaching Council for Scotland. The SPR specifies what is expected of a student teacher at the end of Initial Teacher Education (ITE). The  programme  promotes  the  development  of  the  three  aspects  of  the  Standard  for Provisional Registration (SPR): Professional values and personal commitment; Professional knowledge and understanding; Professional skills and abilities. It recognises that these three aspects are inherently linked to each other in the development of the teacher, and one aspect does not exist independently of the other two. It is this inter-relationship among all three which leads to appropriate professional action.

Graduates of this programme will have knowledge and critical awareness of:

Professional Values and Personal Commitment in relation to:

  • social justice and inclusion; respecting and valuing children’s rights, promoting fairness and  justice,  and  adopting  anti-discriminatory  practices  in  respect  of  gender,  sexual orientation, race, disability, age religion, culture, socio-economic background;
  • supporting the development of well-being and social competence of children and young people  and  raising  their  expectations  of  themselves  and  others;  demonstrating a willingness to intervene effectively, following procedures that lead to the safeguarding of children; sharing concerns with others in the interests of safeguarding children and young people;
  • critical self-evaluation, lifelong professional learning, collaborative professional development and a willingness to respond to and contribute to changes in policies and practices;
  • encouraging pupils to be healthy, active, enterprising, critical, responsible citizens within local, national, international and global contexts;
  • valuing and respecting the communities in which they work; promoting and responding to partnerships with colleagues, other professionals, parents and learners themselves.

Professional Knowledge and Understanding of:

 

  • the rationale and content of the 3-18 PE curriculum;
  • the approaches to planning and organising a PE curriculum including connections to health and wellbeing, expressive arts, cross-curricular, extra-curricular and community learning;
  • the developing child and the need to differentiate learning experiences to appropriately match all learners capabilities;
  • the key Curriculum for Excellence (CfE) curriculum principles i.e. breadth, balance, progression, continuity, challenge, enjoyment, personalisation and choice, coherence and relevance, and how these might be enacted in practice;
  • the purposes of the 3-18 curriculum as described in national guidelines: to enable young people to become confident individuals, effective contributors, responsible citizens, successful learners; to contribute to personal well-being and social competence;
  • the Scottish education system in its national and international context, and key issues of national educational policy and practice, e.g. social justice, inclusion, child protection;
  • the teacher’s professional, contractual, pastoral and legal responsibilities, e.g. school policy, developmental planning and school improvement, quality improvement, staff development and review, inter-professionalism, reporting to parents;
  • the different theoretical paradigms and perspectives which inform contemporary developments in physical education curriculum and pedagogy
  • the dynamic nature of learning theories in a continually changing socio-cultural context;
  • relevant  research  informing  physical  education  curriculum  and  pedagogy  and  which supports students ability to engage in professional enquiry.

 

Professional Skills and Abilities in relation to:

  • consistent  planning  of  learning  experiences  for  learners  that  are  developmentally appropriate, inclusive and connected;
  • effective communication using a range of strategies that engage learners in motivating, creative and active learning experiences;
  • the principles and purposes of ‘assessment is for learning’, the use of appropriate assessment approaches and the efficient and appropriate recording and reporting of assessment;
  • the ability to use assessment information to identify strengths and difficulties in learners attainment of planned and emerging educational outcomes;
  • using observation and assessment information to plan appropriate ‘next steps’;
  • encouraging learners to undertake self-assessment by discussing progress and increasingly taking responsibility for their own learning;
  • the  organisation  of  learners,  learning  spaces  and  resources,  including  other  staff,  to facilitate safe and effective learning;
  • managing learners sensitively and fairly and promoting positive behaviour;
  • working   collaboratively   within   school   and   in   multi-agency   settings   with   other professionals, ancillary staff and parents;
  • critical   analysis   and   effective   use   of   relevant   educational   literature   to   deepen understanding, improve practice and develop an informed viewpoint on key issues;
  • investigation of practice in a critically analytic, reflective manner to impact on pupil learning and teaching; engaging in professional enquiry and action research; contributing to curriculum development;

Programme outcomes: Graduate attributes - Skills and abilities in research and enquiry

Graduates of this programme will:

1) search

for, access, critically analyse, evaluate and synthesise relevant literature and information in order to develop their knowledge and understanding relating to education, physical education, physical activity, sport and wellbeing

2) critically question current physical education knowledge and policy and how these elements relate to wider issues within society nationally and globally (e.g., environmental, health and sustainability issues)

3) identify and define problems relating education, physical education, physical activity, sport and wellbeing research methods to address these

4) plan and execute a significant research project including undertaking data collection and analysing data systematically

5) communicate research plans and findings to specialist and non- specialist audiences.

6) recognise the importance of reflecting on the learning experience.

Programme outcomes: Graduate attributes - Skills and abilities in personal and intellectual autonomy

Graduates of this programme will:

1) be independent learners who take responsibility for their own learning, and are committed to continuous reflections, self- evaluation and self-improvement

2) be able to exercise substantial autonomy and initiative in academic activities, including decision making on the basis of independent thought

3) be open to new perspectives, methods and creative ideas in understanding education, physical education, physical activity, sport and wellbeing

4) be able to reflect on social and ethical responsibilities linked to the application of their knowledge and judgments in education, physical education, physical activity, sport and wellbeing

Programme outcomes: Graduate attributes - Skills and abilities in communication

Graduates of this programme will:

1) be able to communicate using oral and written methods to specialist (e.g., staff, fellow students) and non-specialist audiences (e.g., schools, research participants)

2) be able to use communication as a means for collaborating and relating to others including staff, fellow students, research participants

3) be able to engage in critical discussion demonstrating listening skills, effective use of evidence and own experience to support assertions, and clear articulation of points.

4) be able to identify and effectively communicate with relevant individuals and organisations beyond their immediate environment

5) be able to seek and value open feedback to inform genuine self- awareness

Programme outcomes: Graduate attributes - Skills and abilities in personal effectiveness

Graduates of this programme will:

1) be able to plan, execute and critically evaluate a significant research and/or evaluation project in the area of education, physical education,  physical activity or sport

2) have the confidence to make informed decisions relating to problems and issues in physical education.

3) be able to identify and manage risks appropriately (e.g., during fieldwork, working with vulnerable groups)

4) be able to transfer knowledge, skills and abilities to a professional context (e.g., schools, health promotion organisations)

5) be able to effectively work collaboratively with others, recognising the diversity of contributions individuals can make

Programme outcomes: Technical/practical skills

Graduates of this programme will be able to:

1) gather and analyse variety of data

2) develop the technical and practical skills to enable them to undertake practitioner  enquiry

3) manage and organize time, resources, records and information to support decision-making and inform planning for children’s learning

4) read  purposefully  and  record  what  is  relevant  from  a  range  of  academic  and  professional literature and resource material

5) write accurately and clearly for academic purposes

6) use ICT to enhance their own learning

7) use ICT skills in a school context to promote the learning and analysis in physical education

Programme structure and features

The programme is a single honours programme, students will exit at  the  end  of  Year  4  with  the  award  of  MA (Hons)  in  Physical Education. Year  5  is  the  Induction  year  during  which  probationer  teachers  are  allocated a school in a Local Authority via a system operated by the GTCS.  A  planned  programme  of  study  for  early  career  teachers  is  being  developed  in  partnership  with  Local  Authorities. This  may  include  some  early  Masters  level credits.

The structure of the MA (Hons) Physical Education Programme (with credit points)

 

 

Yr 1

 

EDUA08102

Physical Education Curriculum and Pedagogy: An Introduction to 3-14 Physical Education

EDUA08101 Educational Studies 1a: Introduction to Education and Education Research

EDUA08100 Educational Studies 1b: Teaching, learning and the Curriculum for Excellence

 

SPRT08002 Sport Science 1a

 

SPRT08003 Sport Science 1b

SCQF Level (Credits)

8

(40)

8

(20)

8

(20)

8

(20)

8

(20)

 

 

Yr 2

 

 EDUA08104 Physical Education Curriculum and Pedagogy 2: The Early Secondary Years

EDUA08099 Educational Studies 2a: Child & Adolescent Development in Education

EDUA08098

Educational Studies 2b: Inclusion and Citizenship in the 21st Century:

 

Electives (*1)

EDUA08103 Understanding Physical Culture: Philosophical and Sociological Perspectives (*2)

SCQF Level (Credits)

8

(40)

8

(20)

8

(20)

8

(20)

8

(20)

 

Yr 3

 

EDUA10180

Physical Education and Curriculum Pedagogy 3: National Awards

EDUA10179

Professional Development

 and Leadership 1

EDUA10173 Educational Studies 3: Equality and Social Justice in the Formation of School and Classroom Cultures

EDUA10178

Physical Education Perspectives 3 (*3)

SCQF Level (Credits)

10

(40)

10

(40)

10

(20)

10

(20)

 

Yr 4

SCQF Level 10

EDUA10177 Physical Education

Curriculum and Pedagogy 4: Aims and Concepts

 EDUA10176

Professional Development and Leadership 2

EDUA10172 Educational Studies 4: Independent Research Project in Education

EDUA10175 Physical Education Perspectives 4(*4)

SCQF Level (Credits)

10

(20)

10

(40)

10

(40)

10

(20)

Yr5

Induction year in a Scottish School organised by the GTCS where graduates of the programme work to attain the Standard of Full Registration required for employment in Scottish Schools.

*1 Electives, the 20 credits in Yr2 allows students to access in Semester 1 level 8 courses from within the institute and the wider University as part of the rationale of specialist study informed by studies from the wider University. Table 2 below indicates semester 1 courses that students could select as part of their programme. There could be by 2015-16 when the first cohort would be at the Yr2 phase other courses available within the College or Institute which could be available for selection by students. The Degree Programme Template indicates that students can select courses from schedule C or J as their timetable permits. This provides the opportunity for courses other than the ones indicated below to form part of the degree, however these courses learning outcomes would be well matched to the overall programme aims.

Table 2 Electives for MA (Hons) Physical Education in Yr2

Course Code

SCQF Level and Credits

Current Options open to Yr 2 MA (Hons) PE Students within the Institute

SPRT08004

8 (20)

Sport Science 2A  Bio chemistry & Skill Acquisition

SPRT08006

8 (20)

Sport Science 2C  Biomechanics and Information Technology

     
   

Current Courses within the School of Education

EDUA08080

8 (20)

Education and Childhood Practice

     
   

Options open to Yr 2 MA (Hons) PE students out with the School of Education

SCIL08004

8 (20)

Sociology 1A:  The Sociological Imagination: Individuals and Society

SSPS08005

8 (20)

Scotland:  Society and Politics

SCWR08004

8 (20)

Social Work: Policy and Legal Frameworks

SCSU08001

8 (20)

Science and Society 1A

*2 Understanding physical culture: Philosophical and Sociological perspectives – this is a new course open to students across the College.

*3 Physical Education Perspectives 3, this course is comprised of units in Aesthetics, Biomechanics, Exercise Physiology, Skill Acquisition, Sport Psychology and Socio-cultural. The model for the course is that students select two areas of study, from the three areas of Aesthetics, Science and Socio-cultural to allow for a breadth of study in Yr3 of the programme.

*4 Physical Education Perspectives 4, this course requires the students to select one of the units from the two areas of study that they elected in Physical Education Perspectives 3 allowing for the specialisation and depth of study in an academic area informing pedagogical practice in physical education.

Progression requirements

To attain the  MA (Hons) Physical Education  students  are  required  to  pass  all  courses  within  the  School  of  Education  at  level  8  and  10. Four resits per course are permitted for all level 8 courses across the Programme, and one for level 10 courses subject to regulations. Where a student resits a level 10 course, the original fail mark will be used for degree classification. A supporting document is provided by the professional body, GTCS to indicate the requirement to allow students resit opportunities for all course, rather than progression via an aggregated average grade. This allows students to evidence that they meet, not only the academic requirements of courses, but also the Standard for Provisional Registration, as required by the General Teaching Council for Scotland (GTCS). Achievement of the MA (Hons) Physical Education is considered at the final board of examiners. Any student who is unable to continue on the Programme because of academic failure would then have their profile reviewed against the exit awards available (See section 12d). Students unable to continue with their studies (for reasons other than academic failure) may apply for Interruption of Studies. Students in this position are encouraged to re-­join the Programme the following year.

 

Exit awards available at the completion of specific stages of the programme

The mode of study for the programme is full time over four years. Students who elect to withdraw from the programme or who are not able to progress as a result of academic performance may exit at 120 credits with a Certificate of Higher Education, 240 with a Diploma of Higher Education and at 360 credits with a BA Education Studies. Students who do not attain the Professional Development and Learning 1 course in Year 3 of the MA (Hons) Physical Education programme after a resit attempt may not take this course again to attain the 360 credits required for the BA (Ord) Education Studies or BA (Ord) Physical Education. The BA (Ord) Education Studies or BA (Ord) Physical Education degrees are not recognised by the GTCS as qualifications which enable graduates to enter the induction year.

A Degree Programme Table for the BA (Ord) Education Studies is currently part of the DRPS for the School of Education and will be updated to reflect the new courses available.

 

Relevance of the Programme to the School Plan and University Strategic Plans

The proposed MA (Hons) Physical Education Programme is aligned with the Institute and School strategic plans to remodel existing Initial Teacher Education Programmes in the light of the TSF (2010) report. The provision of this professional programme, contributes to the realisation of the following strategic goals and themes of the School of Education as outlined in the School Plan 2013-14:

  • Enhancing the student experience in learning and teaching

  • Engaging with the wider community

  • Building strategic partnerships and collaborations

  • Promoting social responsibility

Teaching Scotland’s Future (2010) recommended that there are national partnership arrangements between ITE providers and Local Authorities and partner schools. Government and professional association expectations about these arrangements are still in development and the National Partnership Group sub group for the early Phase of Teacher Education report was published in November 2012. It is expected that the formation of a National Implementation Board (NIB), to oversee that the next phase of the recommendations of the report, will lead to more developments in the formalisation of partnership agreements. Proposed revised partnership arrangements with schools and local authorities will provide opportunities for research and knowledge exchange activities with the profession. The School of Education is developing a distinctive model of partnership to reflect the requirements of the ITE programme provided by the School. The MA (Hons) PE programme intends to work in partnership with all Local Authorities, this is particularly important given the number of partner schools required to enable the delivery of the programme. Developing and maintain partnership agreements is complex and requires a considerable investment of time to ensure that this strategic and operationally important area of ITE is given the attention required. The School of Education has recently appointed two lecturers to share the role of Director of Teacher Education Partnerships. These members of staff provide strategic leadership for the development, implementation and overall management of a new model of partnership between the University of Edinburgh and stakeholders in teacher education. The new model of partnership aims to:

  • Improve the student experience, learning outcomes and levels of attainment for students on initial teacher education programmes

  • Enhance support for the early career phase of teachers’ careers

  • Provide innovative opportunities for career-long professional learning, including through the new Scottish Masters route

  • Offer new mechanisms for supporting leadership and management in education

The new model of partnership is designed to raise attainment levels for learners and provide enhanced qualifications and professionalism for teachers in all education settings by supporting an increase in the standard of practice in education. The Programme team are working with a newly established Local Authority Partnership Group which is piloting research projects for 2012-2013 to help explore possibilities that emerge from the written partnership agreements that are required by the National Partnership Group. Such projects will involve university and school staff working together in innovative ways for the benefit of student learning.

The programme team work with the link members of staff from HMIE and Education Scotland. There are also partnerships that the programme team have developed with Disability Scotland, Asthma UK, SportScotland and associated National Governing Bodies. These external partnerships support the Professional Learning Weeks, which is an area where there are more developments planned as the programme team explore how experiences can be extended into the induction year. Proposed revised partnership arrangements with schools and local authorities will provide opportunities for research and knowledge exchange activities with the profession. Government and professional association expectations about these arrangements are still in development and the National Partnership Group sub group for the early Phase of Teacher Education report was published in November 2012. It is expected that the formation of a National Implementation Board (NIB), to oversee that the next phase of the recommendations of the report, will lead to more developments in the formalisation of partnership agreements. In the meantime, with the agreement of Directors of Education from local authorities, a local authority partnership group has been established by staff at Edinburgh University that includes ITE programme directors and local authority staff. Programme directors have established with this group a framework for a new evolving developmental model of partnership that is based upon reciprocal benefit to all parties.

University  staff  are  currently  negotiating  with  Local  Authority staff  through  the  newly established Local Authority Partnership Group pilot research projects for 2012-2013 to help explore possibilities that emerge from the written partnership agreements that are required by the National Partnership Group. Such projects will involve university and school staff working together in innovative ways for the benefit of student learning. Proposed examples include: school staff team-teaching with university staff on PEC&P courses; university staff leading seminars for mentor teachers and students on school sites during placements; university staff leading staff development sessions for mentor teachers on university sites during placement. School staff attending and leading ISPEHS seminar series events held at University. These activities coupled with the use of information technology can improve communication and relationships in the professional triad that exists between student, cooperating teacher and university tutor.

Partnerships are also internal; the University hosts the Centre for Sport and Exercise and the coaching weeks that support the student sports associations, are also being developed to include the professional learning needs of students on the MA (Hons) Physical Education programme. The University also hosts research centres and the programme team wish to forge and develop working relationships which lead to research informed teaching and knowledge exchange opportunities. One very exciting development for the University is that the UN Regional Centre of Expertise in Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) for Scotland will become part of the School of Education. Within the School of Education there are two existing research units where stronger links can be made; the NSPCC Child Protection Research Centre and the Physical Activity for Health Research Group.

Teaching and learning methods and strategies

Approaches to Teaching and Learning

The range of teaching and learning methods used on the programme, by year of programme (including opportunities for feedback)

Across the programme there are a wide range of approaches to teaching and learning. Students will experience a range of teaching and learning approaches across each year of the programme. Students will experience a balance of lectures, seminars, workshops, practical experiential workshops, unsupervised group work and independent study. The lecture programme for each course provides students with the opportunity to hear from experts across the School of Education. There will typically be reading and pre- and/or post-lecture tasks associated with each lecture, maximising the student’s active role in learning through lectures. Workshops contain a mix of small group discussion and activities, and discussion with the class as a whole, as appropriate. There will usually be reading and/or pre-workshop tasks to be prepared in advance of each class. Students are expected to come fully prepared in order to make the most of workshop time. Workshops are an important opportunity for ongoing informal assessment, where students receive feedback on their progress and understanding through discussions. Unsupervised group work takes a number of forms: for instance students may be directed to undertake group tasks in preparation for workshop activities, and they may choose to form small study groups to read and think collectively outside of timetabled classes. Practical experiential workshops form the core of the Physical Education Curriculum and Pedagogy courses and this is where students will develop pedagogical content knowledge appropriate for a career in physical education.

Each course within the programme is supported by a virtual learning environment (VLE), using whatever platform is supported by the University (currently Learn). The VLE are also used to communicate key information, distribute resources such as lecture notes, video links e-reserve articles and academic literacies materials, and to provide an online space for academic discussion. The use of VLE’s is developing so that these are more than repositories of informative and become an interactive part of the learning experience, where students can obtain and provide feedback on their learning.  The School of Education makes use of Turnitin’s peermarking feature and provides support so that students develop scholarly writing through the use of the Grademark element of the software.

Facilities (e.g. library; IT or any other distinctive facilities provided within the School)

The programme requires specialist teaching facilities and the programme has first call on the practical teaching areas in St Leonard’s Land. There is an agreement in place with the Centre for Sport and Exercise, which enables the use of these world class facilities at Peffermill playing fields and the use of two outdoor education centres which the programme requires to ensure  that  all  students  have  the  opportunity  to  engage  in  meaningful  practical  work. Additional  resources  are  occasionally  required  to  use  facilities  off-site,  and  these  are normally restricted to option course in Yrs 3 & 4 of the programme.  The equipment and practical spaces require resourcing and investment to maintain a safe and effective learning and teaching environment. As the use of technologies becomes more embedded in schools the programme will need to develop and expand the resources available to the teaching staff and students. This will not only enhance the student experience and enable students to become familiar with learning technology it will hopefully lead to innovative learning approaches so that pupils in schools have high quality experiences.

Teaching and learning workload

You will learn through a mixture of scheduled teaching and independent study. Some programmes also offer work placements.

At Edinburgh we use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, tutorials, practical laboratory sessions, technical workshops and studio critiques.

The typical workload for a student on this programme is outlined in the table below, however the actual time you spend on each type of activity will depend on what courses you choose to study.

The typical workload for a student on this programme for each year of study
Start yearTime in scheduled teaching (%)Time in independant study (%)Time on placement (%)
Year 129638
Year 220728
Year 312880
Year 497516

Assessment methods and strategies

Assessment Strategy

In line with University and CAHSS priorities, assessment activities have been designed to support student learning by requiring students to develop and demonstrate the skills and knowledge specified in the learning outcomes for each course. A wide range of assessment strategies are proposed across courses within the programme. Assessed activities have also been designed to be varied and imaginative in nature: a wide range of tasks sit alongside examination and essays. Students will be required to demonstrate that they have attained or exceeded the learning outcomes for courses via reports, projects, presentations, online portfolios, journals, research reports, lesson plans and multi-media assignments. Each course descriptor contains information about formal and less formal tasks and other opportunities for feedback to and amongst students. (Appendix * indicates the assessment tasks)

Assessment method balance

You will be assessed through a variety of methods. These might include written or practical exams or coursework such as essays, projects, group work or presentations.

The typical assessment methods for a student on this programme are outlined below, however the balance between written exams, practical exams and coursework will vary depending on what courses you choose to study.

The typical assessment methods for a student on this programme for each year of study
Start yearAssessment by written exams (%)Assessment by practical exams (%)Assessment by coursework (%)
Year 120080
Year 200100
Year 3173350
Year 481775

Career opportunities

The MA (Hons) in Physical Education is a professional and academic programme of study enabling provisional registration with the GTCS. Following graduation, all home, EU and RUK students are currently entitled to a paid year of employment in a supported induction year with a Scottish local education authority under the Teacher Induction Scheme. Graduates with the MA (Hons) Physical Education will have distinctive subject specialist knowledge and will be in a position to show leadership in curriculum development at school and Local Authority level within an area of the Curriculum for Excellence which enhances the health and wellbeing of all learners. The programme’s progressive placement experiences provide graduates with the experience of working in different school and educational settings. This will help to develop graduates abilities to become productive members of a professional work-place and the wider community. It is intention of the programme team to explore how the ‘Edinburgh Award’ could be promoted to the students who are likely to be engaged in many of the activities linked to the award in its current form. Experience indicates that graduates are able to secure posts in other careers allied to teaching; sports development, sports coaching, active schools managers and physical activity leaders. Feedback and research indicates that students on the programme could make more use of the University Careers Service. This service provides advice to students on employment opportunities beyond Scotland and alternative career pathways.

Other items

To be confirmed.