Undergraduate study - 2020 entry

Degree Programme Specification 2019/2020

Childhood Practice (BA Ord)

To give you an idea of what to expect from this programme, we publish the latest available information. This information is created when new programmes are established and is only updated periodically as programmes are formally reviewed. It is therefore only accurate on the date of last revision.
Awarding institution: The University of Edinburgh
Teaching institution: The University of Edinburgh
Programme accredited by: n/a
Final award: BA
Programme title: Childhood Practice
UCAS code: Not applicable
Relevant QAA subject benchmarking group(s): Education
Postholder with overall responsibility for QA: Dr Shereen Benjamin, Director of Quality Assurance
Date of production/revision:

24 June 2014

External summary

The new high-quality BA Childhood Practice part-time degree programme at the University of Edinburgh is aimed at those wishing to mix study with work. It has been designed to meet the new Standard in Childhood Practice and students who successfully achieve the BACP are able to apply for registration as a manager/lead practitioner with the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC).

The programme will build on the students' previous work and study experience.

Students carry out three years of part-time/evening study in order to gain a BA in Childhood Practice.

Students will have the opportunity to study in the following areas:

Childhood Studies (e.g. child psychology, disability studies, ethnicity studies, gender studies and the sociology of childhood). Should children have the same rights as adults? How do you talk to a seven year old? How do you protect children? How effective are services for children and their families? Are children's rights just a Western luxury?

Education Studies (e.g. curriculum development, social justice and equity in education)

Child and Family Health Education (e.g. health care, child development, health and illness and play)

Child/Family Development and Social Policy (e.g. care, nurturing, play development, supporting parents and children, child and family legislation, child protection, child and family rights):

Management and Organisational Behaviour (e.g. professionalism, leadership, integrated working, working in teams)

Transferable skills (e.g. project management, presentation skills, essay/report writing, etc);

A central component of the degree will cover inter-agency working, organization development and management skills. This will be supported by the opportunity to develop the ability to carry out effective research and evaluation in the workplace, and to develop innovative practice in child-care and educational settings. The programme aims to enable experienced staff to validate existing management skills, and less experienced staff to develop management skills.

What is special about the Edinburgh experience in this degree?

The course aims to enable you as a child-care professional to:

  • Gain promotion in your present work place;
  • Gain a degree that will enable you to apply for post-graduate initial training as a teacher, social worker or health promotion worker;
  • Build on the existing skills and knowledge that you have gained from previous academic experience, and from your role as a subject specialist practitioner ;
  • Enable you to progress to the MSc in Childhood Studies, and other selected post graduate courses and programmes;
  • Gain a qualification that will equip you with transferable skills that will enable you to move to a career outwith your present field (e.g. teaching, social work, health promotion, nursing etc).
  • The degree programme is made up of a variety of theoretical, research-based, practical and work-based courses that enables  you to develop a range of skills applicable to a variety of future career paths.

What are the main programme aims (learning outcomes)?

This programme aims to satisfy the emerging workforce market  requirement for highly trained professionals who have:

  • A degree level qualification and training on childcare, education, participation and interagency working.
  • Knowledge of Childhood Studies, Education Studies, Health Education and Social Policy.
  • Knowledge of child and family development.
  • The ability to carry out effective research and evaluation in the work place.
  • The ability to demonstrate organisation development & management skills.
  • Experience of developing innovation in educational & children’s services.

Educational aims of programme

This programme aims to satisfy the emerging workforce market requirement for highly trained professionals who have:

  • A degree level qualification and training on childcare, education, participation and interagency working.
  • Knowledge of Childhood Studies, Education Studies, Health Education and Social Policy.
  • Knowledge of child and family development.
  • The ability to carry out effective research and evaluation in the work place.
  • The ability to demonstrate organisation development & management skills.
  • Experience of developing innovation in educational & children’s services.

Programme outcomes: Knowledge and understanding

In relation to Knowledge and Understanding you will:

  • demonstrate knowledge of the underlying principles/values of educational, social and health issues concerning childhood in Scotland, UK, Europe and other continents.
  • demonstrate knowledge of the diversity of learners/contexts and the ability to consider issues concerning diversity, social justice, family background and child protection.
  • develop an understanding of the roles, relationships and structures associated with childhood.
  • develop awareness of the relevant concepts and theories of childhood studies and how they relate to, and have evolved from other paradigms e.g. sociology, psychology, social policy etc.
  • demonstrate the ability to connect these theories to policy and practice, employ primary and secondary sources and consider issues such as inter-agency working, joint training and vocational development.

The courses within the programme contain a range of information covering specific thematic areas. These are:

  • Child Protection
  • Wellbeing and Health
  • Family and Parents
  • Childhood Theory (e.g. drawn from psychology, child development, sociology, geography and anthropology)
  • Diversity (disability, ethnicity, gender, etc)
  • Social Justice (see 'Themes' table below).
  • Organisational Structure and Management (theory and practice)

The courses will enable you to build on your knowledge gained in Further Education and other training organisations, and to experience courses that involve interaction ('Joint Training') with students from community education and social policy courses.  Many of these courses offer the opportunity for vocational development through work-based assessment.

All of the courses will require you to develop knowledge of the underlying principles and values of the thematic area, to use primary and secondary sources and to analyse and reflect on the variety of roles, relationships and structures encountered by children.  For example, Children and Childhoods will require you to question taken- for- granted assumptions about children and childhood and to consider children's capacity for social action, and Children's Rights will require you to critically assess the impact of various legislation on children, young people and adults

The courses will also enable you to learn about different childhoods in a variety of contexts. For example: Children and the Family will require you to compare and contrast different types of families within a Scottish, UK, European and international context.

The following table shows where aspects of Knowledge and Understanding are addressed in the programme courses.

Knowledge and Understanding

 

I. Underlying

Principles/

Values

II. Diverse Learners

Variety of

Contexts

III. UK & Scottish

Context

IV. European

/International

Context

V.  Roles

/Relationships

& Structures

VI.  Primary /Secondary Sources

CC

x

x

x

x

x

x

CESJ

x

x

x

x

x

x

CHWB

x

x

x

x

x

x

WBL1/2

x

 

x

 

x

x

CF

x

x

x

x

x

x

CHR

x

x

x

x

x

x

 

Themes

 

I. Child

Protection Wellbeing/ Health

II. Family

Parents

 

III. Childhood Theory: Psych/ Soc/Geog

/Anth

IV. Diversity:

Disability

Ethnicity

Gender etc

V Social

Justice

Anti-

Discr.

VI

Joint Training

VII

Vocational

Development

 

CC

x

x

x

x

x

 

 

CESJ

x

x

x

x

x

 

 

CHWB

x

x

x

x

x

 

 

WBL1/2

 

x

 

x

 

x

x

CF

x

x

x

x

x

 

 

CHR

x

x

x

x

x

x

 

Programme outcomes: Graduate attributes - Skills and abilities in research and enquiry

In relation to skills and abilities in research and enquiry you will:

  • demonstrate the ability to question concepts and theories concerning childhood.
  • develop the ability to extend knowledge, understanding and practice by carrying out research/evaluation.
  • demonstrate the ability to accommodate new principles and understandings.
  • demonstrate the ability to connect these to self-evaluation and reflexive practice.
  • gain knowledge of and develop management skills.
  • gain knowledge of how policy is applied in practice.

Most of the students on the BACP programme will have been introduced to basic theories, concepts and principles of childcare and education by previous qualifications they have undertaken e.g. the HNC in Childcare and Education and / or the SVQ4 or the Professional Development Award.  The HNC includes courses in Family Issues, Child Development, Curriculum, Special Services, Child Protection, Child Assessment, Self-Awareness/Personal Effectiveness and Workplace Experience. 

Those of you who come with an HNC in Social Care or Health and Social Care are likely to have knowledge of Child/Human Development, Disability/Independent Living, Child Protection, Community Care Policy/Theory, Health Education, Personal Effectiveness and Counselling.

All of the courses will build on this knowledge in a variety of ways.  You will be asked to question key concepts in health, education and social policy.  For example:

  • Children’s Health and Well-Being The course aims to explore theory, policy and practice in childhood education and health.  It will specifically consider issues of health in educational contexts (e.g. tensions between social and medical models of child health).  Students will be asked to analyse case studies that consider topics such as visual impairment, ADHD, mental health, health promotion projects (e.g. Childsmile, Health Promoting Schools, Health and Wellbeing in Schools etc).  They will utilise a range of reading to develop an understanding of the connections between workplace practice and ideas concerning childhood, health and education.  They will demonstrate knowledge of the connections between health and education policy and be able to consider the links between these contexts and issues of inequality in childhood
  • Children, Education and Social Justice introduces students to the ‘3 message systems’ of education: pedagogy, assessment & curriculum and links these to current educational contexts in Scotland and internationally. The course also introduces students to a range of social justice issues and how they may be manifest in schooling. The course will take an interdisciplinary and multi-agency perspective, encouraging students to undertake critical analysis of the place and purpose of schooling in both the broader context of children’s lives and of the students’ own workplaces

The practical and theoretical context of research, evaluation, reflexivity and change is developed in a number of courses.  For example:

  • CSWBL 1 and CSWBL 2 will enable you to evaluate your own practice, evaluate your workplace and to manage change or develop policy within your workplace.

The following table shows the courses where Application and Reflection are addressed in the programme courses.

Application and Reflection

 

I.

Question Concepts and

Theories

II.

Research

Evaluation

III.

New

Principles

IV.

Reflexive Practice

V

Management Skills

VI

Policy in

Practice

CC

x

x

x

x

x

x

CESJ

x

x

x

x

x

x

CHWB

x

x

x

x

x

x

WBL1/2

x

x

x

x

x

x

CF

x

x

x

x

x

x

CHR

x

 

x

 

 

x

Programme outcomes: Graduate attributes - Skills and abilities in personal and intellectual autonomy

An essential factor in the philosophy of the programme is a commitment to self-development.  This commitment is underpinned by an approach that encourages students to take responsibility for managing an intellectually diverse programme of study and enable students to develop their capacity to interact with their peers within different learning contexts. By working from practice to theory and back to practice, students will develop increased levels of confidence, personal and intellectual autonomy, reflexive and analytical thinking and a dynamic insight into professional competency. Graduates will be able to work independently and sustainably, in a way that is informed by openness, curiosity and a desire to meet new challenges.

Programme outcomes: Graduate attributes - Skills and abilities in communication

Graduates will recognise and value communication as the tool for negotiating and creating new understanding, collaborating with others, and furthering their own learning.

In relation to skills and abilities in communication you will:

  • develop the ability to communicate ideas in speech.
  • develop the ability to communicate ideas in writing.
  • develop the ability to communicate ideas within teams.

Programme outcomes: Graduate attributes - Skills and abilities in personal effectiveness

Graduates will be able to effect change and be responsive to the situations and environments in which they operate.

Programme outcomes: Technical/practical skills

In relation to technical/practical skills you will:

  • employ ICT, graphs and tables.
  • analyse and solve problems.
  • understand own work patterns.
  • work in a team.

Programme structure and features

The curricula model recognises the structure established by semesterisation and the common curriculum guidelines.  You will study on 2/3rds full time basis.

It will take you three years, on a part-time basis, to complete this programme. You will enter directly into year 2 (having gained the equivalent of 120 Credits at level 7/8 through prior learning and experience in the FE sector and /or other situations). To obtain the BA in Childhood Practice, you need to successfully achieve 80 SCQF credits (Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework) per year for the period of three (part-time) years.  You should graduate having achieved 240 credits whilst undertaking your studies here at Moray House.  These together with the 120 credits that you would have entered the degree with will give you the 360 credits required for an ordinary degree – in Childhood Practice.

See below for a breakdown of the programme delivery:

Delivery Courses
Year 1

No delivery. 

Students are awarded 120 SCQF credits for previous learning and experience.
Year 2
  • Children and Childhoods (20 Credits / Level 8)
  • Children and the Family  (20 Credits / Level 8)
  • Childhood Studies Work Based Learning 1: Professional Development (40 Credits / Level 8)
Year 2/3 Composite year
  • Childhood Studies Work Based Learning 2: Organisational Development (40 Credits / Level 10)
  • Children, Education and Social Justice (20 Credits / Level 8)
  • Children’s Health and Well-Being  (20 Credits / Level 8)
Year 4
  • Integrated Working in Children’s Services (20 Credits / Level 10)
  • Childhood Practice Research Project (40 Credits/ Level 10)
  • Children's Rights (20 Credits / Level 10)

In accordance with the University of Edinburgh Undergraduate Degree Structure each full course carries an SCQF rating of 40 forty credits, and a half point rating of 20 credits for other courses.  The programme balances the need for work based learning and professional development with the need for subject knowledge acquisition.  Accordingly, the courses within the programme cover two main strands:

  • Childhood Studies
  • Work Place Development. 

The programme has been developed to meet the Standard in Childhood Practice 2007 and includes courses/lectures from Social Policy

  • Progression requirements

At each stage of the programme you are required to pass the course assignments as set out in the Course Handbooks. Progression from one year of the programme to the next is contingent on you meeting the requirements for each year. 

A number of courses have specific assessments that permit / require you to resubmit failed work.  This is intended to support your learning and has been shown to have a positive developmental impact on students to whom it has applied.

Final BA Degree’s are awarded in compliance with University of Edinburgh Degree Regulations you may be able to achieve a Distinction or Merit.

  • An explanation of the articulation of learning outcomes and assessment practices

The programme will include diagnostic and formative assessment in order to provide feed back to students and staff on the extent to which progress towards the achievement of learning outcomes is being realised.  This will also enable staff to identify students' learning disabilities and identify suitable and/or additional support for learning.  Assessments take a number of forms but are of equitable weight across the courses.  Assessment will also be coherent across courses and enable connection to be made between courses.  It will be closely linked to learning outcomes.  A range of modes of assessment will enable the programme as a whole to provide an accurate profile of student attainment.  Load and distribution will provide suitable time for reading and reflection and take account of employment profiles of 2/3rds full-time students. Course assessment will enable the students to recognise and develop their work based competencies and will enable students to practice self evaluation, management and organisation development skills

  • Modes of study

Modes of assessment are varied, both formative and summative, and encompass written coursework essays and reports, and the assessment of oral performances in workshops. (see section 13 for more details)

Exit Routes

The course will provide a number of exit routes:

  • Diploma of Higher Education: on completion of 120 Credits Level 8;
  • BA Childhood Practice: on completion of 120 Credits Level 8 and 120 Credits Level 10.

The BA Childhood Programme will enable students to, e.g.:

  • apply for registration as a Manager / Lead Practitioner with the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC)
  • return to working with children in a range of Children’s Services contexts e.g. Health, Education and Social Work
  • adopt leadership posts for example as a Manager of a Child Care Service, Manager of a Nursery/Children’s Centre
  • consider a route in post-graduate studies (e.g. Teaching, Social Work, Childhood Studies, Sports Coaching and Health Promotion)

Equal Opportunities

The University has a commitment to equality of opportunity and to this end the University Court has agreed an Equal Opportunities Policy. The aim of this policy is to ensure that the recruitment of staff and students is based on merit, ability and potential, regardless of gender, colour, ethnic or national origin, race, disability, age, socio-economic background, religious or political belief. This Equal Opportunities Policy seeks to eradicate unfair and discriminatory practices wherever they occur and to encourage a diverse community across the University.

Sources:

  • QAA Review and Evaluation Guidance
  • QAA Guidance on Program Specifications
  • SCQF Qualification Framework
  • SSSC Registration Consultation
  • SEED Childcare Career Routes

Teaching and learning methods and strategies

Teaching and Learning strategies employed at the University of Edinburgh consist of a variety of different methods appropriate to the programme aims. The graduate attributes listed above are met through a teaching and learning framework (detailed below) which is appropriate to the level and content of the course. You will be taught through a combination of lectures, tutorials, workshops, independent small-group activity, and the use of e-learning and virtual learning environments.

A variety of approaches are used in the programme-specific courses including:

  • Blended learning through the use of Virtual Learning Environments (WebCT) and a range of other teaching and learning strategies including:
    • traditional teacher-led and directed activities
    • student-led activity
    • exploratory and experiential modes of learning (as a result of the professional focus)

To assist the acquisition of specific skills, the following strategies are employed:

  • group work
  • independent study
  • individual and group preparation and design of activities and presentations. 

The BA Childhood Practice Programme combines a variety of courses that aim to stimulate deep contextualised learning in programme specific groups.  Most courses offer tutor led presentations and discussions as well as opportunities to develop ideas in:

  • workshops - specifically CSWBL 1 and 2 involve some learning supported by workshops
  • tutorial groups of 20-25 students - discussions are informed by course materials and also through workshop tasks carried out by individuals and small groups (involving 3-5 students).  This approach enables the programme to promote contextualised learning (particularly work based learning) and the students to develop a learning community. 

Some courses will provide individual tutorials with staff (e.g., CSWBL1 and 2) and individual and group study (not directly supervised) on tasks set by course tutors.

You will be encouraged to add to the curriculum content with your own individually developed contributions

Teaching and Learning Activities

In Year 2

Lectures

Tutorials

Seminars

Problem based learning activities

Peer group learning

Presentations/Conference

One to one meetings with personal tutors

In Year 3

Lectures

Tutorials

Seminars

Problem based learning activities

Peer group learning

Poster Presentations

One to one meetings with personal tutors

In Year 4

Lectures

Tutorials

Seminars

Problem based learning activities

Peer group learning

One to one meetings with personal tutors

Presentations

Teaching and learning workload

You will learn through a mixture of scheduled teaching and independent study. Some programmes also offer work placements.

At Edinburgh we use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, tutorials, practical laboratory sessions, technical workshops and studio critiques.

The typical workload for a student on this programme is outlined in the table below, however the actual time you spend on each type of activity will depend on what courses you choose to study.

The typical workload for a student on this programme for each year of study
Start yearTime in scheduled teaching (%)Time in independant study (%)Time on placement (%)
Year 113870
Year 213870
Year 313870
Year 46940

Assessment methods and strategies

Assessment

Courses can be assessed by a diverse range of methods and often takes the form of formative work which provides the student with on-going feedback as well as summative assessment which is submitted for credit.

The assessment strategy is carefully designed to support student-centred learning.  Courses involve workshops to maximise feedback opportunities.

Coursework is designed to enable student-centred independent learning and to match the diverse needs of students.  This is in line with the University's commitment to widening participation. Modes of assessment are varied, both formative and summative, and encompass written coursework essays and reports, and the assessment of oral performances in workshops.

In year 2, the role of assessment is generally seen as formative.  Coursework receives a mark but feedback focuses on diagnosis of skills weaknesses and development of strengths.  Tutorials underline the formative function of assessment, providing you with the opportunity to discuss overall strategies and performance.

Assessment increases in rigour at Year 3. Assignments, essays, critical analysis of concepts and work place assessment all add up to provide a variety of opportunities for students to demonstrate their knowledge, skills and values.  The on-going self-evaluation of written work at all levels enables you to reflect upon and evaluate your own experience. Though out the course the use of ICT, library resources and evaluation of oral and written work provides students with the ability to communicate effectively.  The workshop system enables course tutors to provide feedback on work and ensure that a progression towards independent student-focussed learning is well supported.

Assignments in the programme

Assignments within the BACP Programme:

  • take a number of forms but are of equitable weight across the courses

  • are coherent across courses and enable connection to be made between courses

  • are closely linked to the appropriate learning outcomes of each course

  • include a range of modes of assessment that enables the programme as a whole to provide an accurate profile of student attainment

  • constitute a load and distribution that provide suitable time for reading and reflection and take account of employment profiles of 2/3rds full-time students
  • will not make excessive demands on staff time as the processes have been carefully considered
  • enable learners to recognise and develop their work based competencies
  • enable learners to practice self evaluation, management and organisation development skills

More specifically:

In Year 2

  • Oral Presentations  (formative assessment)

  • Essays  (summative assessment)

In Year 3

  • Oral Presentations  (summative assessment)

  • Poster presentation (summative assessment)

  • Essays (summative assessment)

In Year 4

  • Essays (summative assessment)

  • Oral Presentation (formative assessment)

Assessment method balance

You will be assessed through a variety of methods. These might include written or practical exams or coursework such as essays, projects, group work or presentations.

The typical assessment methods for a student on this programme are outlined below, however the balance between written exams, practical exams and coursework will vary depending on what courses you choose to study.

The typical assessment methods for a student on this programme for each year of study
Start yearAssessment by written exams (%)Assessment by practical exams (%)Assessment by coursework (%)
Year 100100
Year 200100
Year 300100
Year 400100

Career opportunities

Graduates in Childhood Practice can register with the Scottish Social Services council (SSSC) as childcare managers to apply for promotion in their current workplace or can choose to train as a social worker, teacher or health promotion worker.

The BA Honours Childhood Studies programme will enable students to consider future career paths that will include working in:

  • Voluntary Organisations
  • Specialist Childcare Provision
  • Local and National Childcare Initiatives (e.g. sure start)
  • Post-graduate studies (e.g. Teaching, Social Work, Childhood Studies, Sports Coaching and Health Promotion)

Other items