Student Disability Service

Case study: supporting a student with a temporary injury

Case study highlighting the support that can be put in place for students whose studies are affected by a temporary injury

Shereen contacted the Student Disability Service (SDS) having badly broken a number of bones in her writing hand a few days before a crucial re-sit exam.  Given the severity of Shereen’s injury and the highly technical nature of the subject she was re-sitting, a scribe with some knowledge of the subject was definitely going to be required to support her in her exam.  Shereen would obviously also require a separate room in which to sit her exam.

Generally, SDS would recommend a scribe plus 50% additional time to support a student in such circumstances and the Exams Team of Academic Registry would make the necessary arrangements, appointing a scribe to work with the student. However, as the exam was only a few days away, there was no guarantee that these adjustments would be able to be put in place in time for Shereen’s exam.  Consequently, the student was advised to discuss their situation with the School’s Student Support Office, as they may be able to source a suitable scribe, potentially from their postgraduate student cohort.

The Student Support Officer (SSO) within the School was incredibly helpful and resourceful, and was able to source a candidate who could scribe for Shereen and also function as an invigilator for the exam.  The SSO liaised closely with the Exams Team to ensure that Shereen could sit her exam at the same time as her classmates.  The also provided a suitable room in the school, in which Shereen’s exam could take place.

SDS provided Shereen with guidance for working with a scribe, as it was such a different way for her to sit exams.  [Link to attached document TBC].  In addition, she was made aware of the possibility of ongoing support should she still be struggling to write when her studies resumed in September.

Shereen successfully passed the exam.  Her hand healed quickly and she required no ongoing support when she returned to University following her re-sit.