Control of Infectious Diseases
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Improving vaccine-induced responses in cattle

A novel surgical model allows scientists to study bovine immune responses in situ.

Surgically prepared calf with lymph cells being collected for studies of vaccine-induced responses
Surgically prepared calf with lymph cells being collected for studies of vaccine-induced responses.

With the aim of improving vaccine-induced responses in cattle, for example for the control of bovine tuberculosis, we have developed a novel surgical model to study bovine immune responses in situ.

We have re-established a pseudoafferent lymphatic duct cannulation model to access immune cells as they migrate from sites of vaccination or infection in cattle. This has allowed us to describe the movement and activities of cells in real-time as immune responses are generated1. These findings will be extended in a newly funded project to define signatures of vaccine-induced protective immunity2.

In parallel, there are ongoing studies of novel cell populations at the interface of the innate and adaptive immune systems, such as bovine NKp46+CD3+ cells and NK that amplify responses to vaccination and to Mycobacterium bovis infection2, which causes bovine tuberculosis.

For further information about funded projects please see our news story.

Original publications

  1. Hamilton CA et al. (2017) Frequency and phenotype of natural killer cells and natural killer cell subsets in bovine lymphoid compartments and blood. Immunology 151:89-97. DOI:10.1111/imm.12708
  2. BBSRC funded project ‘Defining signature responses at the innate-adaptive interface to inform the design of vaccines inducing cellular immunity’.  BB/P003958/1
  3. Connelley TK et al. (2014) NKp46+ CD3+ cells: a novel nonconventional T cell subset in cattle exhibiting both NK cell and T cell features. J Immunol. 192:3868-80. DOI:10.4049/jimmunol.1302464