Edinburgh Research Office

RS MacDonald Seedcorn

The RS Macdonald Seedcorn Fund has been created to support the development of neuroscience research projects and collaboration at the University of Edinburgh.

About the fund

The RS Macdonald Seedcorn Fund has been created to support the development of neuroscience research projects and collaboration at the University of Edinburgh. The RS Macdonald Trust's research remit is to support reserachers who are "creating a better future for children and adults affected by neurological conditions or visual impairment." They are particularly interested in research that looks into the causes, prevention and management of these conditions.  With the University of Edinburgh RS Macdonald Seedcorn Fund, we particularly welcome projects that enhance links between our externally funded centres. 

Eligibility

To be eligible for an award from the Edinburgh Neuroscience RS MacDonald Seedcorn Fund:

  • You should be working as a principal investigator or postdoc at the University of Edinburgh (clinical staff should have an honorary contract with the University), or be a member of one of our Philanthropic Centres (if not at the University of Edinburgh)
  • Applications will be given preference if they:
    • Support new/increased collaboration across life course areas (i.e. linking our different philanthropic centres) or further research addressing shared life course mechanisms
    • Foster new collaborations
    • Are likely to lead to substantive future funding from grants or investment
  • Requests for awards of up to £5,000 (£10K in exceptional circumstances, which must be justified) will be considered.
  • This fund is appropriate for clinical and human proposals, as well as fundamental research proposals, but should address the broad aims of the RS Macdonald Trust (outlined above)
  • Matched funding is welcome but is not required.
  • One third of the funds available will be awarded to postdoctoral researchers since we recognise that awards of this nature are important for career development.

Information on the Edinburgh Neuroscience website