Sarah Tribout-Joseph

Head of French and Francophone Studies

  • French and Francophone Studies
  • Department of European Languages and Cultures
  • School of Literatures, Languages and Cultures

Contact details

Address

Street

Room 3.42
50 George Square

City
Edinburgh
Post code
EH8 9LH

Availability

  • Drop-in office hours during teaching semester:

    Tuesday 1pm-2pm
    Thursday 10am-11am

Background

Whilst finishing her PhD at the University of Cambridge, Dr Tribout-Joseph took up a teaching fellowship in French at the University of St Andrews in 2004. She came to the University of Edinburgh in 2005.

Undergraduate teaching

  • The Modern City: Paris (Final-year option)
  • In addition to her commitments in the French and Francophone department she is also Programme Director of the MSc in Comparative Literature.

Open to PhD supervision enquiries?

Yes

Areas of interest for supervision

She would be very happy to supervise students from a Francophone or comparative perspective on:

  • spatial projects on the city, the suburbs, the countryside/landscape, landmarks/memorials, mobilities, travel/tourism, refugee narratives,
  • museum space, memory studies
  • the modern and contemporary novel, 
  • Medical Humanities

Current PhD students supervised

Naomi Guzman-Santana

Research summary

 

Dr Tribout-Joseph's research has focused on 19th to 21st century literature and in particular the modernist and contemporary periods. She has published a monograph on discourse in Proust and Joyce. In 2008 she completed an AHRC-funded project on a methodological enquiry into the practice of close textual analysis and visual imagery in Proust. She is now working on representations of the city in contemporary narratives.

Project activity

Current projects include looking beyond the museum city at attempts to represent the invisible areas on the outskirts on towns and life in inhospitable, disused and derelict areas within towns. She is interested in developing interventionist reading strategies to approach social issues and Medical Humanities narratives.