Frances E. Rowbottom

Thesis title: 'William Faulkner's Uses of Myth'

Background

Frances Rowbottom is a final-year PhD researcher at the University of Edinburgh. Focusing on William Faulkner’s uses of myth and legend, her research is based primarily on the American South, and the parallels of Mississippi to Faulkner’s fictional Yoknapatawpha County.

Frances is currently examining the legacies of history and public memory in literature during the period after the Civil War, with a focus on the creation and implementation of the myth of the Lost Cause and coinciding racial politics in a post-war society, reaching into the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries.

Forthcoming publication: ‘Historical Moments and Historical Monuments in Post-Civil War America’ a book chapter within The Living Legacy of African American Studies: Its Past, Present, and Future(s). Forthcoming, University of Georgia Press.

 

In July 2022, Frances was awarded the Faulkner Society's Hunt Scholarship.

Undergraduate teaching

Literary Studies 2A

 

This course covers works of literature in four centuries, from 1380 - 1788. Students will produce work on Chaucer, Shakespeare, Behn, Donne, Milton and others.

Research summary

The legacies of the Civil War on literature and histories, with a particular focus on the works of Wiliam Faulkner.

Current research interests

The Civil War, The Lost Cause, Race Tensions in America, African American Histories

Past research interests

African and Caribbean Fictions, World War One Literature, Vietnam War Literature, PTSD and Representation in Literature

Conference details

I presented my research on the legacies of the American Civil War in a panel at the biennial Society for the Study of Southern Literature (SSSL) Conference in Atlanta, Georgia, in June 2022. This panel was in collaboration with Michael LeMahieu (Associate Dean at Clemson University, South Carolina) and Cody Marrs (University of Georgia).

This paper was entitled 'The South’s Cultural Memory of the Civil War in the Twentieth- and Twenty-First Centuries,’ and addressed how cultural memory was transformed from a heritage of living veneration to a modern-day denigration of the Civil War’s interpretation, by historical events in the mid-twentieth century. Participating in this highly-regarded conference offers the prospect of expansion and publication.

 

I presented my current PhD research in a panel paper at the annual ‘Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference’ at the University of Mississippi, held in July 2022. This paper expanded upon ‘William Faulkner’s Narrative Time in Relation to a Regional Scale of Modernism’.

In this panel paper (in association with Peter Lurie) I discussed William Faulkner within the framework of time and narrative technique, in relation to the influence of aspects of modernity and modernisms, with particular reference to Absalom, Absalom!. Participating in this conference also offers the prospect of expansion and publication.

 

I will be representing the Society for the Study of Southern Literature at the Modern Language Association's 2023 Conference, to be held in San Francisco in January 2023. This panel will address the Presidential Theme of 'Labor Conditions', and my paper will be addressing the legacy of slave labour in the American South.

I look forward to continuing my research during this trip, in Washington DC and Richmond, Virginia.

Organiser

Society for the Study of Southern Literature (SSSL)

 

Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha

Papers delivered

'The South’s Cultural Memory of the Civil War in the Twentieth- and Twenty-First Centuries’

‘William Faulkner’s Narrative Time in Relation to a Regional Scale of Modernism’