Anna Girling

Background

I have an MA in English and Modern History from the University of St. Andrews and an MA in English Literature from York University in Toronto.

I am Member-at-Large on the Executve Board of the Edith Wharton Society (https://edithwhartonsociety.wordpress.com), Postgraduate Representative on the Advisory Council of the Institute of English Studies (https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/), and part of the organising committee for Transatlantic Literary Women (https://transatlanticladies.wordpress.com/). I am happy to be contacted in relation to any of these roles - as well as about my own research.

Undergraduate teaching

English Literature 2

I am also a mentor for the online course, How to Read a Novel: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/how-to-read-a-novel/

I also occasionally write reviews for the Times Literary Supplement (http://www.the-tls.co.uk/?s=anna+girling).

Conferences

  • 'Queer Time, Family Time and "Real Life" in The Age of Innocence', Modern Language Association Annual Convention, Chicago, January 2019.
  • Organiser (for Transatlantic Literary Women): 'Women in the Archives', National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh, 25 September 2018.
  • Panel organiser: ‘Edith Wharton’s Protest Novel? Rethinking The Fruit of the Tree’; Paper: ‘Family Money: Wealth, philanthropy and “inherited obligations” in The Fruit of the Tree’; European and British Associations of American Studies, King’s College London, University College London and the British Library, April 2018.
  • ‘Intellectual Vagrants and Mechanical Readers: The Promise of Tautological Value in The House of Mirth and “The Vice of Reading”’, Society for the Study of American Women Writers, Université Bordeaux Montaigne, July 2017.
  • “Quibbles and compromises and moral subtleties”: casuistry and anti-Catholicism in Edith Wharton’s early career’, British Association of American Studies, Canterbury Christ Church University, April 2017.
  • '"Quibbles and compromises and moral subtleties": Casuistry and Anti-Catholicism in Edith Wharton's "That Good May Come"., Wharton in Washington (Edith Wharton Society Conference), Washington, DC, June 2016.
  • "The gift you can't escape": debt and the (im)possibility of redemption in Edith Wharton's The Touchstone,' American Literature Association Annual Conference, Boston, May 2015.
  • ‘“Agrope among alien forces”: alchemical transformations and capitalist transactions in Edith Wharton’s The Touchstone’, Scottish Association for the Study of America Annual Conference, University of Edinburgh, March 2015.
  • ‘The Point is to (Ex)Change It: Exchange, value and desire in The House of Mirth’, Edith Wharton and The Custom of the Country: Centennial Reappraisals (An Edith Wharton International Symposium), Liverpool Hope University, August 2013.
  • ‘Sheep and dogs and the Scotch psychic sense: Mackenzie King’s genealogical excursions’, William Lyon Mackenzie King: Unsung Hero?, British Association for Canadian Studies (BACS) History and Politics Group Conference, University College London (UCL) Institute of the Americas, July 2013.
  • ‘Epilepsy as Illness, Blindness as Metaphor: Epileptic and Mis(sing)representation’, International Comics and Graphic Novel and International Bande Dessinée Society Joint Conference, University of Glasgow and University of Dundee, June 2013.
  • ‘“Boy Fenwick of Careless-Days-Before-The-War”: Remembering (the) Boy and Forgetting the War in Michael Arlen’s The Green Hat’. Alternative Modernisms, University of Cardiff, May 2013.
  • ‘Blind Hope: The Day of the Locust and the Promise of Dystopia’. The Future Ain't What It Used To Be: Interactions of Past, Present and Future in Literature and Visual Media, University of Dundee, June 2009.

Invited talks

  • ‘Edith McWharton? Edith Wharton in Scotland’s Archives,’ University of Glasgow, Transatlantic Literary Women Edith Wharton Workshop, October 2017.

  • ‘“Maddened with War”: Nancy Cunard and the First World War’, Transatlantic Women in the Trenches, Pollok Park, Glasgow (public lecture as part of the Cultural Connections: Transatlantic Literary Women project), April 2017.