Psychology

Human cognitive neuroscience seminar

Speaker: Ailsa E Millen (Research Fellow, University of Stirling)

Title: Identifying novel markers of concealed face recognition

Abstract: Police officers routinely use photographs of faces to establish key identities in crimes. Some witnesses are honest, but many are hostile and intentionally conceal knowledge of known identities. For example, criminal networks, such a terrorist groups, will deny knowledge to protect one another. A victim might also be too afraid to identify their attacker. The liar’s goal is to hide any cues that might reveal their knowledge; the officer’s job is to look beyond the verbal denial, and establish the truth. My research aims to find ways to help detect such deception, not by looking for signs of lying directly, but by looking for signs of recognition. I will present my work using the Concealed Information Test (CIT) using novel approaches based on theoretical models of familiar and unfamiliar face recognition (e.g. eye tracking).

Contact

The seminars are organised by the Human Cognitive Neuroscience research group. For further information, or if you would like to join the e-mail list for these seminars, please email Andreea Stamate or Carolane Hélin.

Human cognitive neuroscience

Andreea Stamate

Carolane Hélin

Feb 27 2019 -

Human cognitive neuroscience seminar

2019-02-27: Identifying novel markers of concealed face recognition

Lecture Theatre F21, Psychology Building, 7 George Square, Edinburgh, EH8 9JZ