News

Plan to enrich nation's treasures

The University is to take part in a range of initiatives linked to Scotland's renowned museum collections.

The University and National Museums Scotland will work together on a range of activities.

These will include public events, joint teaching and research initiatives and the creation of new gallery displays.

Long-standing connection

The agreement strengthens ties between the two neighbouring institutions.

Links were forged more than 150 years ago when natural history artefacts belonging to the University were transferred to the national collections.

Since then, academics and curators have collaborated across a range of disciplines, including history, archaeology, science and the cultures of Japan, China and the Middle East.

Working partnership

We are delighted to build on our existing relationship with National Museums Scotland. We look forward to a greater number of collaborations across the disciplines to support academic endeavour and public engagement.

Professor Sir Timothy O'SheaPrincipal, University of Edinburgh

Specialists have worked together on popular events such as the Edinburgh International Science Festival, and exhibitions on topics including mummies, textiles and particle physics.

A Memorandum of Understanding, underlining a commitment to greater joint working, was signed in a ceremony at the National Museum of Scotland.

The signing took place in the gallery displaying the Hunting the Higgs Boson exhibition, which has involved staff from both organisations.

It was signed by Prof Sir Timothy O'Shea, Principal and Vice Chancellor of the University of Edinburgh, and Dr Gordon Rintoul, Director of National Museums Scotland.

Formalising our partnership with the University strengthens our long-standing association, bringing greater opportunities to collaborate on academic research and exhibition development. We look forward to sharing the results of our joint working with visitors through the publication of topical research and a programme of public events.

Dr Gordon RintoulDirector, National Museums Scotland