Department of European Languages and Cultures

The Pavlovian discourse of species in Soviet literature and film in the 1930s

Professor Henrietta Mondry (University of Canterbury, New Zealand/Peterhouse, Cambridge)

The Nobel Prize winning physiologist Ivan  Pavlov is famous for his studies on the conditioned reflexes of dogs. Pavlov’ 's vision of dogs willing self-sacrifice out of love for the experimenters became transposed into a wider cultural discourse in the Soviet Union in the 1930s. Drawing on the paradigm of human-animal studies, the talk examines the formation of a particular ideological discourse of species and its representation in Soviet science, dog training manuals, fiction and film adaptations. 

Biography

Henrietta Mondry is Professor in the Department of Global, Cultural and Language Studies and in the Department of English at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. She is Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand and member of the NZ Centre for Human-Animal Studies. She has been awarded numerous research Fellowships in the Universities in the US, Europe and UK, including Distinguished and Senior Research Fellowships at the Institute of Advances Study, Durham; Skirball Fellowship at the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, and Canterbury Exchange Fellowships at Oxford and Cambridge. She is currently Visiting Fellow at Peterhouse, Cambridge. Professor Mondry’s research interests are in the field of 19th, 20th and 21st century Russian literature in the context of cultural and intellectual history. The new direction of Henrietta's research is in the unfolding interdisciplinary Human-Animal Studies. Her recent books are Exemplary Bodies: Constructing the Jew in Russian Culture (2010) and Political Animals: Representing Dogs in Modern Russian Culture (2015).

Veterok and Ugolyok in space
Nov 27 2017 -

The Pavlovian discourse of species in Soviet literature and film in the 1930s

In this talk Professor Henrietta Mondry (University of Canterbury) examines the formation of a particular ideological discourse of species and its representation in Soviet science, dog training manuals, fiction and film adaptations. 

Room G.01
50 George Square
Edinburgh
EH8 9LH