MRC Institute of Genetics & Molecular Medicine
MRC Institute of Genetics & Molecular Medicine

Bringing Genomics into Clinical Care

A special guest seminar by Professor Teri Manolio, Director of Genomic Medicine, US National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) hosted by Prof Tim Aitman and Prof Cathie Sudlow.

University of Edinburgh, Usher Institute and MRC Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine

Speaker:           Professor Teri Manolio, Director of Genomic Medicine, US National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)

 

Title:                Bringing Genomics into Clinical Care: Genomic Medicine Research Programs of the National Human Genome Research Institute

 

When:              Tuesday October 8 at 1500

 

Location:         

South Seminar Room,

Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine (IGMM)

University of Edinburgh,

Western General Hospital Campus,

Crewe Road, Edinburgh EH4 2XU

 

Hosts:              

Hosted on behalf of IGMM and the Usher Institute by Professors Tim Aitman (Director of Centre for Genomic and Experimental Medicine, IGMM) and Cathie Sudlow (Director of Centre for Medical Informatics, Usher Institute)

 

Speaker Biography:

Teri A. Manolio, MD, PhD

Director, Division of Genomic Medicine, National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)

Professor of Medicine, F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

Attending Staff, Internal Medicine, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center

Dr. Manolio directs NHGRI’s Division of Genomic Medicine, where she leads programs to develop and implement genomic applications in clinical care. She received her M.D. from the University of Maryland and did her internal medicine residency at Boston City Hospital. She was chief resident of the Georgetown Service at D.C. General Hospital and a fellow in general internal medicine at Johns Hopkins University, where she earned a Master of Health Sciences in epidemiology.  She later returned to Hopkins to complete a Ph.D. in human genetics/genetic epidemiology.  She joined the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute in 1987 where she was heavily involved in large-scale cohort studies such as the Cardiovascular Health Study, the Framingham Heart Study, and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. 

She came to NHGRI in 2005 to lead efforts in applying genomic technologies to population research, including the Electronic Medical Records and Genetics (eMERGE) Network, the NHGRI Genome-Wide Association Catalog, and the Clinical Genome (ClinGen) Resource. She continues to practice and teach internal medicine at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and is a professor of medicine the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.  She is the author of over 280 research publications and has research interests in genome-wide association studies of complex diseases, ethnic differences in disease risk, integrating genomic research into electronic medical records, and incorporating genomic findings into clinical care.