Nursing Studies

Estimating the role of alcohol in rural Sri Lankan injury

This current study works with health services in Sri Lanka to estimate the involvement of alcohol in injury in a rural region.

Estimating the role of alcohol in rural Sri Lankan injury - baseline data for a cluster randomized controlled trial

This project, Funded by Scottish Funding Council Global Challenges Research Fund, aims to directly address a need for capacity building to improve surveillance data that could help develop and inform research and policy strategies.

Alcohol is a major global health problem contributing to over one in 20 of global deaths (WHO, 2014). In rural Asia, high levels of legal and illicit alcohol use contribute to injury, including road traffic injuries and suicide. Sri Lankan injury rates are high with annual mortality and disability rates of 177 and 290 per 100 000 population. The cirrhosis mortality rate of 33.4 per 100,000 males is among the highest in the world. However, no national surveillance system exists for alcohol-related morbidity. National Authority on Tobacco and Alcohol (NATA) is seeking assistance to develop methods to quantify alcohol-related harms.

The current study uses an established collaboration with the health services in the North Central Province in Sri Lanka to estimate the involvement of alcohol in injury in a rural region. Data is being collected from in-patients (main aim) and out-patients (secondary aim) in one secondary and two primary hospitals in the region. Acute injury presentations (admission within 24 hours of injury) are assessed in relation to mechanism, place and injury type. In addition, patients are screened for alcohol use in the past 12 months using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and current presence of alcohol using breathalysers.

Project team:

Professor Michael Eddleston (PI), University of Edinburgh

Professor Aisha Holloway, University of Edinburgh

Professor John Norrie, University of Edinburgh

Dr Melissa Pearson, University of Edinburgh

Dr Lisa Scholin, University of Edinburgh

Professor Sisira Sribaddana, Rajarata University of Sri Lanka

Professor Suneth Agampodi, Rajarata University of Sri Lanka

Mr Manjula Weerasinghe, Rajarata University of Sri Lanka

Dr Fahim Mohamed, University of Peradeniya