Counselling, Psychotherapy and Applied Social Sciences

Programme structure

Health in Social Science includes a high degree of flexibility by offering choice from a variety of health-related option courses as well as free options available across the University.

Typical degree curriculum: MA Health in Social Science
1st Year 2nd Year 3rd Year 4th Year
Mapping Health and Illness across Societies Contemporary Issues in Health and Wellbeing Ethical Values and Challenges in Care Honours Dissertation (counts as TWO courses)
Identity and Experience in Health and Society Language and Communication in Health and Society Psychological Perspectives on Health and Care Health Management and Management of Health
At least ONE course selected from a list offering complementary perspectives on health, care and society At least ONE course selected from a list offering complementary perspectives on health, care and society; Understanding and Investigation: Methods for Health Research Positive Health for Communities and Individuals
A maximum of THREE free option courses to make a total of SIX courses per year A maximum of THREE free option courses to make a total of SIX courses per year Plus THREE free option courses Plus TWO free option courses

Teaching and learning

Teaching and learning methods vary across the programme and move incrementally towards giving more responsibility to students.

Years 1 and 2

In Years 1 and 2, compulsory courses are delivered through lectures or guided group work and tutorials, which incorporate a variety of classroom activities and small group discussion.

Years 3 and 4

In Years 3 and 4, compulsory courses are taught through seminars and workshops and will make use of group and project work to maximise the range of learning opportunities.

Assessment

The programme aims to use a variety of assessment methods and pays full regard to accessibility across the full range of students. Each course tailors assessment according to its learning outcomes, and normally includes a mid-semester assessed activity as well as a final assessment.

Exams are kept to a minimum with few compulsory courses making use of this approach. Individual feedback is provided on all individually-assessed work.

Students will also be engaged in guided peer feedback and assessment activities throughout the course to enhance learning, and to promote skills and understanding around learning targets.