Study abroad in Edinburgh

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Semester 1

From Oligarchy to Democracy: the Politics of Reform in Great Britain and Ireland, 1828-1928 (HIST10395)

Subject

History

College

CAHSS

Credits

20

Normal Year Taken

3

Delivery Session Year

2022/2023

Pre-requisites

Visiting students must have completed at least 3 History courses at grade B or above. We will only consider University/College level courses. Applicants should note that, as with other popular courses, meeting the minimum academic entry requirements does NOT guarantee admission. **Please note that 3rd year History courses have extremely limited spaces available, and are very popular, so students cannot be guaranteed a space in any 3rd year History course.** These enrolments are managed strictly by the Visiting Student Office, in line with the quotas allocated by the department, and all enquiries to enrol in these courses must be made through the CAHSS Visiting Student Office. It is not appropriate for students to contact the History department directly to request additional spaces.

Course Summary

This course charts the arc of political and constitutional change between Catholic emancipation and the full enfranchisement of women a century later. During this period, parliamentary and other reforms were very often initiated by the political establishment itself with the intention of shoring up old systems rather than of bringing new ones into existence. This mentality, which has been described as 'reforming to conserve', will be a key focus of this course.

Course Description

This course charts the arc of political and constitutional change between Catholic emancipation and the full enfranchisement of women a century later. Although Britain's route to participatory democracy was comparatively smooth and peaceful (indeed, Britain was unique among its European peers in being untouched by revolution during this century), progressive reform was never inevitable. This course consequently emphasizes the contingent nature of this process. British democracy was never pre-ordained, despite the claims of Victorian liberals who described successive reforms as evidence of inevitable 'progress'. Nor was the Westminster Parliament in the vanguard of democracy during this period. In 1914 Britain was governed by one of the least representative parliaments in the developed world. This course consequently emphasizes the staying power of the ancien regime in the face of reform. During this period, parliamentary and other reforms were very often initiated by the political establishment itself with the intention of shoring up old systems rather than of bringing new ones into existence. This mentality, which has been described as 'reforming to conserve', will be a key focus of this course.

Assessment Information

Written Exam 0%, Coursework 100%, Practical Exam 0%

view the timetable and further details for this course

Disclaimer

All course information obtained from this visiting student course finder should be regarded as provisional. We cannot guarantee that places will be available for any particular course. For more information, please see the visiting student disclaimer:

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