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Semester 1

Art and Archaeology of the Roman Near East and Egypt (CACA10038)

Subject

Classical Art/Classical Archaeology

College

CAHSS

Credits

20

Normal Year Taken

3

Delivery Session Year

2022/2023

Pre-requisites

Visiting students must have at least 3 courses in Classics related subject matter (at least 2 of which should be in Ancient History or Classical Art/Archaeology) at grade B or above for entry to this course. We will only consider University/College level courses. Applicants should note that, as with other popular courses, meeting the minimum academic entry requirements does NOT guarantee admission. **Please note that 3rd year Classics courses are very popular and have strict visiting student quotas, meaning that they have a very high number of students wishing to enrol in a very limited number of spaces.** These enrolments are managed strictly by the Visiting Student Office, in line with the quotas allocated by the department, and all enquiries to enrol in these courses must be made through the CAHSS Visiting Student Office. It is not appropriate for students to contact the department directly to request additional spaces.

Course Summary

This course aims to introduce students to the material culture of the Roman Near East and Egypt and to develop their understanding of the interaction between eastern and western cultural forces in classical antiquity. Through detailed studies of the painting, sculpture, mosaics, coinage and architecture of key cities, such as Alexandria, Jerusalem and Petra, it will be demonstrated how varied was the reception of classical culture by the pre-existing local societies and their religions.

Course Description

This course aims to introduce students to the material culture of the Roman Near East and Egypt and to develop their understanding of the interaction between eastern and western cultural forces in classical antiquity. More specifically, through detailed studies of the painting, sculpture, mosaics, coinage and architecture of key cities, such as Alexandria, Jerusalem and Petra, it will be demonstrated how varied was the reception of classical culture by the pre-existing local societies and their religions. Despite the adoption of aspects of Greek and Roman art, local cultural identities remain distinctive in their unique blending of local and classical elements. The sophistication evident in the use of these classical elements to create new versions of art will be highlighted, as well as the interaction between art, politics and religion. Particular focus will be placed upon the transition to Roman rule and the underlying Hellenistic continuity. Also, the rise of Christianity and its influence on Jewish art will be examined to understand how religious identities were expressed through art. This artistic expression, with enduring Greco-Roman influences, survives into the early Islamic period (c. 700 AD) in the design of famed monuments, such as the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem. The comprehension of the cultural interaction of this region is particularly relevant to increasing understanding between the West and the Middle East today.

Assessment Information

Written Exam 50%, Coursework 50%, Practical Exam 0%

view the timetable and further details for this course

Disclaimer

All course information obtained from this visiting student course finder should be regarded as provisional. We cannot guarantee that places will be available for any particular course. For more information, please see the visiting student disclaimer:

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