Giving

One health

How we are enabling breakthroughs in health teaching and research.

No mind left behind

an icon showing 2 minds

The Salvesen Mindroom Centre was founded in 2000 by Sophie Dow whose daughter has learning difficulties.  Since then, it has supported thousands of families living with learning difficulties. Thanks to a donation from Alastair and Elizabeth Salvesen in 2015, the charity established the SMC Research Centre into Learning Difficulties in a collaboration with the University of Edinburgh.

No mind left behind

Hidden suffering

Andrew Horne with research team

While 80 per cent of adults are familiar with diabetes, fewer than 20 per cent have heard of endometriosis. That startling figure, provided by Endometriosis.org, emphasises one of the reasons why it is such a difficult condition to research, and why developing better management and treatment remains a challenge. 

Hidden suffering

Mending broken hearts

Mending broken hearts
Stem cells are a cornerstone of regenerative medicine, potentially one of the most revolutionary areas of 21st-century biomedical science, harnessing the power of a patient’s own cells to help failing organs heal. A groundbreaking new project taking place at the University is showing promise in helping heart attack patients avoid future heart failure.

Mending broken hearts

Who wants to be a GP?

Who wants to be a GP?

As the NHS turns 70, looming staff shortages mean the future of the National Health Service may be more insecure than ever. Concerns are acute in primary care, with the number of General Practitioners (GPs) shrinking following years of underinvestment. Workloads are growing while budgets are falling, and yet some of our best students remain dedicated to carrying out this essential community role. We find out why.

Who wants to be a GP?

The Quest for One Health

The Quest for One Health

Edinburgh scientists are finding that collaboration is the key to solving the world’s growing health problems. This vision of a collaborative and interdisciplinary way of working received a significant endorsement earlier this year when the Wolfson Foundation generously pledged £2 million to support the creation of a brand new building for the School of Biological Sciences.

The Quest for One Health

A revolution in cancer research

Margaret Frame

As the University receives £2.4 million in funding for research into brain tumours, we speak to Professor Margaret Frame of the Edinburgh Cancer Research Centre about her team’s work and a revolution in the research of cancers. 

A revolution in cancer research

Tackling poor prognosis

Tackling Poor Prognosis

Dr Steve Pollard has been researching brain cancers for more than 10 years. He says that with internationally recognised strengths in cancer research, genetics, stem cell biology and neuroscience – together with a significant new crop of young brain tumour researchers – the University is perfectly poised to make advances in the field.

Tackling poor prognosis

The dramatic lives of Rum’s red deer

Photograph of two red deer

Research into red deer has been conducted on Rum since 1953. It is the world’s longest-running study of a deer population. Cambridge and Edinburgh researchers have investigated a wide range of questions on behavioural ecology, population dynamics, variation in individual breeding success, natural selection, genetic variation, ageing and the effects of climate change. 

The dramatic lives of Rum’s red deer