School of Economics

Course detail

Details of course options in the honours (third and fourth) years of the degree in economics.

Year three

Topics in Microeconomics

This course is designed to provide a coherent development of some important topics in microeconomic analysis at a more advanced level than that of standard intermediate courses. It thus extends and deepens the work of Economics 1 and Economics 2, bridging the gap between intermediate and graduate level courses in economics, and providing insight into some recent areas of economic research activity. Throughout there is an emphasis on the application of economic principles.

Topics covered are likely to be drawn from:

  • economics of asymmetric information, principal agent model, hidden action, moral hazard, hidden types adverse selection
  • topics in game theory
  • auctions
  • bargaining theory
  • topics in behavioural economics

Essentials of Econometrics

Essentials of Econometrics (EE) provides an opportunity to learn skills that are important for later stages of the Economics programme, and many future career and life contexts. EE aims to ensure that all economics honours students have a sound grasp of the basic techniques of modern empirical economics.

The topics covered are likely to include:

  • statistics (review of probability distributions, statistical inference, estimation and hypothesis testing)
  • the linear regression model (two-variable model, multiple regression, functional forms, dummy variables)
  • regression analysis in practice (model selection criteria and tests, multicollinearity, heteroskedasticity, autocorrelation)

There are weekly lab sessions to reinforce lectures, with exercises which foster 'learning-by-doing'

The course provides an opportunity to develop and practice key practical skills in:

  • computing
  • data gathering
  • processing
  • analysis
  • presentation

Topics in Macroeconomics

This course is designed to provide a coherent development of some important topics in macroeconomic analysis at a more advanced level than that of standard intermediate courses. It thus extends and deepens the work of Economics 1 and Economics 2, bridging the gap between intermediate and graduate level courses in economics, and providing insight into some recent areas of economic research activity. Throughout there is an emphasis on the application of economic principles.

Topics covered are likely to be drawn from:

  • public debt deficits and fiscal sustainability
  • development accounting and cross country income differences
  • global imbalances, sovereign debt and default
  • demographic changes and funding social security
  • optimal currency areas and the euro
  • optimal policy areas and fiscal federalism
  • monetary policy operating procedures and transmission mechanisms
  • politics and economic growth
  • development aid, debt and conditionality

Year four

In fourth year, you will take modules from a selection which varies each year and could include topics such as:

  • Advanced Mathematical Economics  
  • Behavioural Economics  
  • Development Economics  
  • Economic Development and Structural Transformation
  • Economics of Asymmetric Information  
  • Economics of Education 
  • Economics of Inequality  
  • Economics of Migration  
  • Economics of Sport  
  • Economics of Strategic Behaviour  
  • Economics of the Family
  • Economics of Transition  
  • Experimental Economics  
  • International Economics  
  • Issues in Climate Change Economics  
  • Modelling the Financial Crisis and its Aftermath  
  • Natural Resource and Environmental Economics  
  • Policy Evaluation for Public Economics  
  • Productivity, Growth and Development  
  • The Chinese Economy: Past and Present  
  • The Economics of Cities and Regions  
  • The Economics of Crime