Scottish Graduate Programme in Economics

Glasgow

The University of Glasgow's distinction in economics research is exemplified by their most famous student, Adam Smith, the founding father of Economics.

University of Glasgow

The study of economics at Glasgow, like the University itself (which was founded in 1451), has a long and distinguished history. Perhaps our most famous student was Adam Smith, author of The Wealth of Nations and founding father of the modern social science now known as Economics.

Economics at the University of Glasgow

A nineteenth-century illustration of the Trongate and Old Exchange in Glasgow.
© iStock.com/duncan1890

 

Our distinction in economics research continues to the current day.

In particular, the current department has a significant international research profile in the fields of macroeconomics, international economics, econometrics, and development economics.

Macroeconomics research

Within macroeconomics, we have particular interests in:

  • macroeconomic theory and policy, with an Economics and Social Research Council (ESRC)-financed research project on Monetary and Fiscal Policy Interactions
  • the determinants of productivity growth and growth theory, with a recently completed ESRC-financed research project on business cycles and growth
  • the fiscal theory of the price level
  • macroeconomic adjustment and labour markets, with a collaborative ESRC funded project on effects of Devolution
  • monetary economics and financial markets

In addition, the department has recently completed its involvement in a collaborative ESRC-financed macro-modelling project.

International and development economics

In international economics, our recent research has focused particularly on strategic trade theory, regional integration and factor mobility, export insurance, and the trade performance of the Asian newly industrialised economies (NIEs).

Our research focus in development economics has been in areas such as human development indices and the role of structural adjustment programmes in developing country growth.

Economics research at the University of Glasgow