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Nina Kozar

Nina Kozar's biography and research focus.

Miss Nina Kozar

PhD Student - Meijer Group

  • Chancellor's Building
  • 49 Little France Crescent
  • Edinburgh, EH16 4SB

Contact details

Personal Profile

 

  •  BBSRC EASTBIO PhD in Neuroscience (University of Edinburgh, 2017-present)
  •  BSc (Hons) in Immunology (The University of Glasgow, 2013-2017)
  •  Honours laboratory project - ‘Harnessing antigen size to drive vaccine responses’ (The University of Glasgow, September-December 2016)
  •  Wellcome Trust Vacation Studentship - ‘Microglial involvement in antibody-mediated type I interferon-like responses in the Central Nervous System’ (The University of Glasgow, July-September 2016)

Research

My project focuses on the molecular and cellular mechanisms that govern the stereotypic distribution of voltage gated potassium channels (Kv) within myelinated axons. Defective distribution of these complexes in the nervous system has been implicated in many neurological disorders such as ataxia and epilepsy.

The typical organisation of the node of Ranvier and its flanking regions in myelinated axon is here revealed by antibodies against the cytoskeletal protein βIV Spectrin, which is highly enriched at the nodal membrane (red). The axon-glia junctions that flank the node of Ranvier and define the paranodal membrane, are visualized by an antibody against the cell adhesion molecule Caspr (green). The transmembrane protein ADAM23 (blue) is highly expressed at the juxtaparanodal membrane under the myelin sheath where it co-localises with the shaker-type voltage-gated potassium channels Kv1.1 and Kv1.2.
The typical organisation of the node of Ranvier and its flanking regions in myelinated axon is here revealed by antibodies against the cytoskeletal protein βIV Spectrin, which is highly enriched at the nodal membrane (red). The axon-glia junctions that flank the node of Ranvier and define the paranodal membrane, are visualized by an antibody against the cell adhesion molecule Caspr (green). The transmembrane protein ADAM23 (blue) is highly expressed at the juxtaparanodal membrane under the myelin sheath where it co-localises with the shaker-type voltage-gated potassium channels Kv1.1 and Kv1.2.

Previous research has suggested that interactions between CASPR2 and TAG-1 drive the assembly of Kv channels at the juxtaparanodal membrane (JXP) of myelinated axons (Horresh et al. 2010). However, preliminary data from the Meijer lab have shown that Kv1 complex assembly and stability at the JXP critically depends on ADAM23 and its ligands LGI2 and LGI3.

In this research project, we will establish how these proteins contribute to the assembly and maintenance of Kv channel complexes in both myelinating axons as well as in remyelinating axons following nerve injury.