Professional development

Training aimed at improving your personal and professional skills relevant to your PhD and your future career

Booking: these courses generally open for booking one month in advance of the shown date. If you do not see a live booking link please check back nearer the course date.

Cancelling: If you need to cancel your booking, please do so at your earliest opportunity and at least 3 days before the event. Someone else may be able to take your place, but we need time to contact them. Also, although you are not charged for an event, there are costs we incur (e.g. photocopying) which relate directly to places reserved.

How to cancel: you can cancel your booking via the MyEd Event Booking Channel. Go to MyEd and then the Event Booking Channel. Click on “My Bookings” - here you will have the option to cancel your place.

We maintain attendance registers; unexpected absences will be noted. If you consistently fail to attend, or repeatedly cancel with very short notice, you may be prevented from booking future IAD events.

Facilitation Workshop: Supporting learning in others: the facilitation approach

Description

This course is aimed at doctoral researchers and early career researchers who have responsibility for supporting the learning of others though demonstrating, tutorials, seminars and supervision. 

We all learn in different ways, but we don't always appreciate the impact of these differences on our ability to retain and use information. This course will explain some of the theories that describe learning approaches and give you a set of practical tools to use in your own work.

Facilitation is the art of bringing about learning from the perspective of the learner, so the whole workshop will be based around improving your understanding about learning, by seeing how different teaching and development approaches favour different kinds of learners.

We'll also look at the practicalities of helping people learn - what steps you need to take and how to handle potential tricky elements such as feedback and handling questions.

 

If you want to improve your approach to teaching and supporting the development of others, this course will help you to develop effective and engaging methods.

 This course relates to domains D1, D2, and D3 of the RDF.

BookingsThere are currently no events scheduled for this course. Please check back later.

Preparing for First Year Review - School of Physics and Astronomy

Description

This course is for 1st year PhD students. Through a mixture of short presentations and group discussion this course will

  • gives you a clear understanding of the purpose and structure of the First Year Review process
  • allow you to meet students who have already completed their First Year Review
  • give a chance to ask questions of academic staff within your school
  • offer ideas about how to get the most out of the review

It also provides an invaluable opportunity to meet and get to know other PhD students at the same stage as you from across your school.

This course relates to domains A1, C2, and D1 of the RDF.

BookingsThere are currently no events scheduled for this course. Please check back later.

Presenting Made Easy - Delivering Presentations

Description

This course is an optional follow on from the Presentations Made Easy - Presentations Techniques course. This half day course gives participants the opportunity to deliver a presentation.  Participants will present a prepared 5 min(max) talk on subject of their own choice or give an overview of their subject preferably using visual aids. They will then receive positive and encouraging feedback.

This course relates to domains A1, D1, and D2 of the RDF.

Pre-course tasks

You are asked to prepare a 5 minute presentation for the course (this can be on any topic that you like, including your research piece) as well as completing the questionnaire upon booking. Your presentation can take the form of a PowerPoint, Prezi presentation, or other presentation formats.  A data projector and computer (for presentations), overhead projector, and flipchart (stand and paper) will be available on the day of the course. Please bring the presentation with you on the day.

Pre- Requisites

To attend this course, you must have attended the theory session "Presenting Made Easy  - Presentation Techniques

BookingsThere are currently no events scheduled for this course. Please check back later.

Presenting Made Easy - Presentation Techniques (SCE & MVM)

Description

The course is designed to equipt participants with skills and techniques to develop and improve presentations for a variety of audiences. The content of the course addresses specific needs identified by the participants through their completed pre-questionnaires.

Topics covered includes:

  • Confident and engaging delivery
  • Dealing with stage-fright (controlling nerves)
  • Body language
  • Structure
  • Coping with Q and A
  • Enjoy Presenting

To enable participants to maximise the benefits of these new skills , the course is structured as follows:

  • First half day covers techniques and skills
  • Second half day (Presenting Made Easy-Delivering Presentations) participants will present a prepared 5 min(max) talk on subject of their own choice or give an overview of their subject preferably using visual aids. They will then receive positive and encouraging feedback.

 

We aim to dispel the fear  many people feel when being faced with speaking in public.

"True success is overcoming the fear of being unsuccessful."

 

This course relates to domains A1, D1, and D2 of the RDF.

BookingsThere are currently no events scheduled for this course. Please check back later.

Surviving the Confirmation Process: School of Geosciences

Description

This course is for 1st year PhD students in the School of GeoSciences. The first year progress review and confirmation process is a key milestone in your PhD studies and this course is a great opportunity to start preparing for it. Through a mix of presentations, and small group discussions led by second year PhD researchers, this workshop will:

  • Explain the purpose and structure of the PhD confirmation process
  • Outline what makes a good confirmation report and presentation
  • Suggest common mistakes to avoid 
  • Provide advice and tips on how best to prepare and what to expect


It also provides an invaluable opportunity to meet and get to know other 1st year PhD students from your school.

This course relates to domains A and B of the RDF

BookingsThere are currently no events scheduled for this course. Please check back later.

Time Management and Goal Setting

Description

This new two-part course, delivered in a half day, is a highly interactive exploration of how important and personal our daily management and goal setting can be to help us achieve our life and career goals.

We’ll explore themes in Time Management such as:

  • Chronological preferences and their importance
  • Time management tips that work and those that don’t
  • How seasons and work routine/or not have impact on us
  • How to take control of our well-being and performance
  • Why work doesn’t always happen at work

We won’t be looking at diaries...

In Purpose and Goal Setting we’ll look at:

  • Writing your individual purpose statements
  • Working on your work/life strategies
  • Models for goal setting that work for you
  • Traditional models that don’t...and why
  • Devising workable and daily action plans based on Japanese Kaizen principles of incremental change

The course tutor, Iain Davidson, works with many students and staff in universities throughout Scotland and Ireland to help them improve their personal effectiveness and their working preferences for the challenges of rapidly changing world.

Managing your time, your goals and yourself is a new course which will hopefully challenge the way you think about traditional time management and goal setting models.

BookingsThere are currently no events scheduled for this course. Please check back later.

Writing an Informatics Research Paper

Description

This course is for Informatics, 2nd and 3rd Years.

During a full afternoon, this lecture discussion will cover the basics of what you need to know to write a scientific paper and get it accepted at the journal of your choice. We will start by discussing a strategy for reading scientific papers, then carry on with the analysis of an example paper published in the journal Science.

 

Following this, we will discuss the different types of scientific papers and the different types of journals available for Informatics publications. Some attention will be given to explaining what an impact factor is and how to choose the best journal for your work.

 

We will then discuss the process of producing a paper from beginning to end. This will start with the importance of working with your lab head to decide when you are ready to write, why it is important to choose a title very early on in the process. We will end with how to respond to comments from journal editors and scientific referees.  In between, we will discuss what goes where in the manuscript, what data manipulations are acceptable (and some that are not!), how to explain your main points clearly, how to ensure that referees are not confused when they read your paper, and how your lab-mates and colleagues can help you to prepare a better manuscript. Significant attention will also be given to explaining how the editorial process works at common biological journals, and how to effectively interpret and then deal with comments from referees.

 

Pre-course work

Please note that you will be asked to write a 1000 (+/- 10) word summary of your research project. Print this summary and bring it to the course with you. It is essential that you do this or you will not be able to play a full role in the practical part of the course. (It's ok to re-use text from your existing writing.)

This course relates to domains A1, A2, A3 and D2 of the RDF.

BookingsThere are currently no events scheduled for this course. Please check back later.

Writing a Research Paper - School of Engineering

Description

Publishing a paper in a journal is the main and most important way of communicating the results of your research to the research community. This course offers advice and guidance from senior researchers at the University of Edinburgh on how to write a paper and get it published, from notebooks to the first draft, submission, referees' comments, publication and all steps in between.

The workshop will cover the following topics:

  • Writing for publication 
  • How to read a paper 
  • How to write a paper 
  • Presenting your work for publication
  • Choosing the journal
  • Preparing the paper 
  • Journal formats, submission 
  • The editorial process 
  • Co-authors agreement, copyright transfer, reprints

 

This course relates to domains A1, A2, A3, and D2 of the RDF.

BookingsThere are currently no events scheduled for this course. Please check back later.

Sharing course participation data: IAD policy and practice is to be transparent and to share participation data with University schools and departments. The full policy document is available below:


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