Communication

Improve your written communication, presentation skills, and develop public engagement skills

Booking: these courses generally open for booking one month in advance of the shown date. If you do not see a live booking link please check back nearer the course date.

Cancelling: If you need to cancel your booking, please do so at your earliest opportunity and at least 3 days before the event. Someone else may be able to take your place, but we need time to contact them. Also, although you are not charged for an event, there are costs we incur (e.g. photocopying) which relate directly to places reserved.

How to cancel: you can cancel your booking via the MyEd Event Booking Channel. Go to the “My Stuff” tab within MyEd and then Event Booking. Click on “My Bookings” - here you will have the option to cancel your place.

We maintain attendance registers; unexpected absences will be noted. If you consistently fail to attend, or repeatedly cancel with very short notice, you may be prevented from booking future IAD events.

Beating Writer's Block

Description

You know you need to start (or continue) to write – so what is stopping you? Writer’s block can occur at any stage in the process of writing a PhD, and typically not only affects planning but well-being and motivation as well.  In this course, we’ll look at how writer’s block manifests, what causes it and what strategies you can adopt to re-connect with your research, your writing, your confidence and your voice

EligibilityMScR HSS All Years PhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years PhD HSS All Years MScR SCE All Years MScR MVM All Years
Date Friday 23-Jan-2015, 09:30 - 12:30
Venue Room 1.07, Main Library Central Area

Bitesize: An Introduction to Social Media

Description

This session provides an overview of social media,  including the popular social media platforms (such as, Twitter, blogs and professional networking sites like LinkedIn), the benefits of using social media, as well as an opportunity to ask questions and hear about other workshops and resources.

This session is suitable for all staff, researchers and PhD students  who want to know more about social media.

Related workshops include

-              Social media for research and impact

-              Managing your digital footprint

-              Brand you: creating an online presence

 

Related links: www.ed.ac.uk/iad/digitalfootprint

EligibilityPGR students PhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years PhD HSS All Years Academic Teaching and Research Academic Researchers
Date Monday 29-Sep-2014, 09:30 - 11:30
Venue Room 11.18 David Hume Tower Central Area
Bookings If you are eligible, you can Book a place on this course.

Bitesize: Measuring and Boosting Your Research Impact: Strategy, Tools and Communicating

Description

Particpants are encouraged to bring their own latop/ipad/tablet to this course.

Academic publishing is evolving rapidly and researchers can now take advantage of new technologies to enhance their research profiles. A range of new tools are emerging that compliment traditional publishing and communication methods. These allow researchers to track their research impact digitally, gain citations for their work, interact with their peers and engage with a non-academic audience.

Using tools such as these can be a beneficial for your research career and can be used to demonstrate public engagement in reports for the Research Excellence Framework. Researchers post opinions, negative results, figures, posters, data, old student projects (and more) and receive acknowledgement from their peers.

 The course will introduce you to a set of online tools (including Figshare, Researchgate, Academia.edu, Impact Story and F1000) designed specifically for academics that can be used to discuss, share and promote your research. In addition, the course will touch on how popular social media platforms can be used to your advantage. Examples of how other researchers use the tools successfully will also be included.

This course is for PhD students and research staff who are interested in building their digital research profile and using new online tools to interact with other researchers, potential collaborators and the public.

EligibilityPhD HSS All Years Academic Researchers PhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years
Date Friday 24-Oct-2014, 08:30 - 10:30
Venue Resource Room, IAD, 7 Bristo Square Central Area

Effective Presentations for College of Science and Engineering and College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine

Description

The course is aimed at people who may be anxious about speaking in public and who would like to increase their confidence in developing structured presentations in order to present their material with flair and style. One of the main aims is to offer a supportive environment, giving positive and constructive feedback to help participants gain confidence and develop their skills through practice. The tutors aim to make it informal, interactive and fun by encouraging participation throughout the day.

The content of the course is tailored to meet the needs of the group (identified through completed pre-course questionnaires). In essence, it covers the knowledge and skills you need to prepare and deliver a well structured, engaging presentation with confidence to a variety of different audiences.

This course relates to domains A1, D1 and D2 of the RDF

Pre-Course task

You will need to prepare one short presentation (maximum of 5 minutes) in advance, preferably with visual aids, on a subject of your choice.

For example, you might choose to give an overview of your subject (which would be ideal for a 5 minute talk) or you might choose to do a presentation on a subject of interest to you such as a hobby.

BookingsThere are currently no events scheduled for this course. Please check back later.

Effective Writing: Grammar

Description

Native speakers of English often have little knowledge of formal grammar and non-native speakers may know the grammar in theory but find the practice is a lot harder. This workshop starts by providing the vocabulary to discuss grammar. Using examples of academic writing from a variety of subject areas, we deal with common errors in sentence construction and punctuation in the work of native and non-native speakers.  Finally, we look at how a knowledge of grammar can help the writer communicate more effectively in a way that the reader will enjoy.

This course relates to domains A1, A2, A3, and D2 of the RDF.

EligibilityPhD HSS All Years MScR SCE All Years MScR MVM All Years MScR HSS All Years PhD SCE and MVM All years
Date Thursday 23-Oct-2014, 09:30 - 16:30
Venue Room 11.18 David Hume Tower Central Area
EligibilityPhD HSS All Years MScR SCE All Years MScR MVM All Years MScR HSS All Years PhD SCE and MVM All years
Date Thursday 13-Nov-2014, 09:30 - 16:30
Venue Room 11.18 David Hume Tower Central Area
EligibilityPhD HSS All Years MScR SCE All Years MScR MVM All Years MScR HSS All Years PhD SCE and MVM All years
Date Thursday 12-Mar-2015, 09:30 - 16:30
Venue Room 1.07, Main Library Central Area
EligibilityPhD HSS All Years MScR SCE All Years MScR MVM All Years MScR HSS All Years PhD SCE and MVM All years
Date Thursday 04-Jun-2015, 09:30 - 16:30
Venue Room 1.07, Main Library Central Area

How to be your own best editor (SCE)

Description

Skilful editing will transform a draft and turn a good piece of writing into an excellent one. This workshop aims to equip you with strategies for editing effectively. We will identify key aspects of good writing – such as clarity, conciseness and flow – and analyse, by means of written examples, how these qualities are realised linguistically. Working with a draft text, you will learn to focus on different levels of your text and make appropriate editorial decisions.

EligibilityPhD MVM All Years PhD SCE All Years
Date Monday 20-Oct-2014, 09:30 - 12:30
Venue Room 5326, James Clerk Maxwell Building Kings Buildings
EligibilityPhD MVM All Years PhD SCE All Years
Date Monday 26-Jan-2015, 09:30 - 12:30
Venue Room 5326, James Clerk Maxwell Building Kings Buildings

Is My Writing 'Academic' Enough? - College of Science and Engineering and Medicine and Veterinary Medicine

Description

Does academic writing have to be dull or obscure, or can it be engaging and direct? This workshop explores the standards and expectations associated with academic writing. We will look at relevant linguistic and stylistic choices (active or passive? first or third person? plain English or jargon?) and consider academic conventions in terms of organisation and writing style. This is very much a 'hands-on' workshop with plenty of room for discussion.

This course relates to domains A1 and D2 of the RDF.

Prerequisites

If possible, students should have attended 'Effective Writing: The Writing Process'

EligibilityMScR MVM All Years PhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years MScR SCE All Years
Date Thursday 25-Sep-2014, 09:30 - 12:30
Venue Room 5215, James Clerk Maxwell Building Kings Buildings
Bookings If you are eligible, you can Book a place on this course.
EligibilityMScR MVM All Years PhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years MScR SCE All Years
Date Friday 09-Jan-2015, 09:30 - 12:30
Venue Room 5215, James Clerk Maxwell Building Kings Buildings

Maximising Your Influence At Meetings

Description

This is a highly participative 2-hour session to explore how you can become more effective and influential at meetings, thus developing a key everyday work skill.

The session includes:-

  • Defining effective meetings
  • Active listening
  • Encouraging good participation
  • Identifying and practising the important verbal behaviours of meetings
  • Dealing with difficult behaviour

This course relates to domains D1, D2, and D3 of the RDF.

RDF Subdomains

 Pre-Course Work

Please give some thought, before attending the session, to the following questions:-

  1. Why are meetings one of the most important methods of communicating in organisations?
  2. Reflect on one or more meetings in which you have been involved and assess the success of these meetings in terms of outcomes.
EligibilityPhD MVM All Years PhD SCE All Years PhD HSS All Years
Date Wednesday 10-Dec-2014, 09:30 - 11:30
Venue Room 11.18 David Hume Tower Central Area

Poster Production

Description

As a postgraduate or early stage researcher, this course will help you with the initial layout and design of an academic poster and provide you with simple guidelines to avoid creating a "missed opportunity" poster. The course will show that creating an effective poster improves your ability to engage with others, and succinctly and clearly communicate your research to a wide audience.

Focusing on the practical elements of a poster event, it will take you through the process of production, completion and final presentation of 'your research on a page'. 

As a group we'll discuss a variety of real examples of academic poster styles - what works and what doesn't. We'll explore ideas on balance, colour and structure to help you incorporate your aims and creative ideas into a valuable poster. The university facilities and technical assistance available will also be discussed.

This course relates to domains D2 and D3 of the RDF.

EligibilityPhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years PhD HSS All Years
Date Tuesday 18-Nov-2014, 09:30 - 12:30
Venue Room 3211, James Clerk Maxwell Building, King's Buildings Kings Buildings
EligibilityPhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years PhD HSS All Years
Date Tuesday 24-Feb-2015, 09:30 - 12:30
Venue Room 3211, James Clerk Maxwell Building, King's Buildings Kings Buildings
EligibilityPhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years PhD HSS All Years
Date Tuesday 21-Apr-2015, 09:30 - 12:30
Venue Room 1.12, Main Library Central Area

Preparing for Conferences: Presenting Your Poster

Description

A follow on from the ‘Your PhD on a page’ workshop, this workshop will focus on how you pitch your research and your poster using traditional 'show and tell' and new 'pecha-kucha' style techniques in visual and verbal interactive communication.

We'll explore your capacity to listen and influence others and give you personal advice/tips to improve your overall pitch at conference. We'll base this on an understanding of elements of psychology such as attention span, listening skills, observation and understanding of human behaviour in environments such as large, noisy conference spaces.

With increasing numbers of posters being displayed and presented in these new ways, this is an ideal opportunity to prepare for any opportunity. If you make a good  impression at conference you should be prepared to stand with your poster for three minutes presenting in the conference hall and on the big screen.

Are you ready for this type of exposure and this opportunity to share your vision?

By the end of the course we will have worked on a clear, concise pitch that allows you to talk with confidence with anyone in the room. This is potentially an essential career and networking skill for your future.

To attend this course, you must have attended one of the School Specific "Preparing for Conferences: Your PhD on a page"

EligibilityPhD SCE All Years
Date Thursday 26-Mar-2015, 09:30 - 12:30
Venue Room 7.20, Michael Swann Building Kings Buildings

Preparing for Conferences: Your PhD on a Page - School of Biology

Description

This course is for researchers who are preparing an academic poster for presentation at conference.

In this course we explore key visual design and communication skill guidelines to focus on layout, visual impact and powerful writing (text). Posters require us to change our communication approaches, writing habits and style. We will learn to write and design with clarity, conviction and impact by using design thinking methods and understanding what does, and does not, work on a poster.

The aim is to explore your untapped creative and personal communication strengths through a well-designed and beautifully communicated message on a poster: potentially your CV on a page!

There is an optional follow up course ‘Presenting your Poster’ which gives you the opportunity to practice presenting your poster.

This course relates to domains D1, D2, and D3 of the RDF.

This course relates to domains D1, D2, and D3 of the RDF.

EligibilityPhD SCE Biology 1st Years PhD SCE Biology 3rd Year PhD SCE Biology 2nd Years
Date Tuesday 02-Jun-2015, 09:30 - 16:30
Venue Room 4325c, JCMB Kings Buildings

Preparing for Conferences: Your PhD on a Page - School of Engineering

Description

This course is for researchers who are preparing an academic poster for presentation at conference.

In this course we explore key visual design and communication skill guidelines to focus on layout, visual impact and powerful writing (text). Posters require us to change our communication approaches, writing habits and style. We will learn to write and design with clarity, conviction and impact by using design thinking methods and understanding what does, and does not, work on a poster.

The aim is to explore your untapped creative and personal communication strengths through a well-designed and beautifully communicated message on a poster: potentially your CV on a page!

There is an optional follow up course ‘Presenting your Poster’ which gives you the opportunity to practice presenting your poster.

This course relates to domains D1, D2, and D3 of the RDF.

EligibilityPhD SCE Engineering all years
Date Thursday 19-Mar-2015, 09:30 - 16:30
Venue Room 4325c, JCMB Kings Buildings

Preparing for Conferences: Your PhD on a Page - School of GeoSciences

Description

This course is for researchers who are preparing an academic poster for presentation at conference.

In this course we explore key visual design and communication skill guidelines to focus on layout, visual impact and powerful writing (text). Posters require us to change our communication approaches, writing habits and style. We will learn to write and design with clarity, conviction and impact by using design thinking methods and understanding what does, and does not, work on a poster.

The aim is to explore your untapped creative and personal communication strengths through a well-designed and beautifully communicated message on a poster: potentially your CV on a page!

There is an optional follow up course ‘Presenting your Poster’ which gives you the opportunity to practice presenting your poster.

This course relates to domains D1, D2, and D3 of the RDF.

EligibilityPhD SCE GeoScience all years
Date Friday 20-Mar-2015, 09:30 - 16:30
Venue Room 4325c, JCMB Kings Buildings

Presenting Made Easy - Delivering Presentations

Description

This course is an optional follow on from the Presentaitons Made Easy - Presentations Techniques course.This half day course gives participants the opportunity to deliver a presentation.  Participants will present a prepared 5 min(max) talk on subject of their own choice or give an overview of their subject preferably using visual aids. They will then receive positive and encouraging feedback.

This course relates to domains A1, D1, and D2 of the RDF.

Pre-course tasks

You will need to prepare one short presentation (maximum of 5 minutes) in advance, preferably with visual aids, on a subject of your choice. Please email this to iad.phd@ed.ac.uk at least one day in advance of the workshop.

For example, you might choose to give an overview of your subject (which would be ideal for a 5 minute talk) or you might choose to do a presentation on a subject of interest to you such as a hobby.

Pre- Requisites

To attend this course, you must have attended the theory session "Presenting Made Easy  - Presentation Techniques

EligibilityPhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years PhD HSS All Years
Date Monday 17-Nov-2014, 09:30 - 12:30
Venue Room 11.18 David Hume Tower Central Area

Presenting Made Easy - Presentation Techniques (SCE/MVM)

Description

The course is designed to equip participants with skills and techniques to develop and improve presentations for a variety of audiences. The content of the course addresses specific needs identified by the participants through their completed pre-questionnaires.

Topics covered includes:

  • Confident and engaging delivery
  • Dealing with stage-fright (controlling nerves)
  • Body language
  • Structure
  • Coping with Q and A
  • Enjoy Presenting

To enable participants to maximise the benefits of these new skills , the course is structured as follows:

  • First half day covers techniques and skills
  • Second half day (Presenting Made Easy-Delivering Presentations) participants will present a prepared 5 min(max) talk on subject of their own choice or give an overview of their subject preferably using visual aids. They will then receive positive and encouraging feedback.

 

We aim to dispel the fear  many people feel when being faced with speaking in public.

"True success is overcoming the fear of being unsuccessful."

 

This course relates to domains A1, D1, and D2 of the RDF.

EligibilityPhD MVM All Years PhD SCE All Years
Date Tuesday 11-Nov-2014, 09:30 - 12:30
Venue Room 11.18 David Hume Tower Central Area

Proof Reading

Description

With that last full stop, the writing task is done. Or is it? This course looks at the many stages of copy-editing and proof-reading that must be done before the thesis is submitted or the academic paper published. We look at some myths about writing, identify common errors and offer a range of techniques for spotting them. Proof correction marks are introduced and put into practice in a peer feedback session. 

This course relates to domains A1 and D2 of the RDF.

Pre-course Work

In preparation for the course, each participant should bring a sample of their academic writing, which they would be willing to discuss with the tutor, and (optionally) with other participants (approx.600 words). Please bring 3 copies of your sample work along on the day.

EligibilityMScR HSS All Years PhD SCE and MVM All years PhD HSS All Years MScR SCE All Years MScR MVM All Years
Date Monday 01-Dec-2014, 09:30 - 13:00
Venue Room 11.18 David Hume Tower Central Area
EligibilityMScR HSS All Years PhD SCE and MVM All years PhD HSS All Years MScR SCE All Years MScR MVM All Years
Date Monday 09-Mar-2015, 09:30 - 13:00
Venue Room 1.07, Main Library Central Area
EligibilityMScR HSS All Years PhD SCE and MVM All years PhD HSS All Years MScR SCE All Years MScR MVM All Years
Date Monday 01-Jun-2015, 09:30 - 13:00
Venue Room 1.07, Main Library Central Area

Speed Reading

Description

In order for academic reading to be effective, it needs to be a combination of efficient (in terms of speed and retention), strategic (in terms of appropriately targeted) and critical.  This short workshop will give you a number of tools to help you to read more quickly, more strategically and more critically.

 

The workshop will cover:

Initial exercises to identify personal needs for rapid reading.  Reading and assimilating written material.  Techniques to increase speed of reading, comprehension and retention including dealing with complex and difficult material. A short introduction on how to maintain improved information selection, absorption, retention and recall.

This course relates to domain A1 of the RDF.

 

EligibilityMScR HSS All Years PhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years PhD HSS All Years MScR SCE All Years MScR MVM All Years
Date Thursday 16-Oct-2014, 13:30 - 16:30
Venue Room 11.18 David Hume Tower Central Area
Bookings If you are eligible, you can Book a place on this course.
EligibilityMScR HSS All Years PhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years PhD HSS All Years MScR SCE All Years MScR MVM All Years
Date Thursday 27-Nov-2014, 13:30 - 16:30
Venue Resource Room, IAD, 7 Bristo Square Central Area
EligibilityMScR HSS All Years PhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years PhD HSS All Years MScR SCE All Years MScR MVM All Years
Date Monday 16-Mar-2015, 13:30 - 16:30
Venue Room 1.09, Main Library Central Area
EligibilityMScR HSS All Years PhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years PhD HSS All Years MScR SCE All Years MScR MVM All Years
Date Thursday 21-May-2015, 13:30 - 16:30
Venue Room 1.07, Main Library Central Area

The Writing Process: Getting Started (SCE&MVM)

Description

For many researchers, starting to draft is one of the most challenging aspects of writing a PhD. How do you know whether you are ready to write? How do you overcome that sense of paralysis or overwhelm that often accompanies the early stages of the writing process? This workshop provides tools and tips for when and how to get started; for generating, focusing, targeting and structuring material; and for developing a first draft. All of these will be put into practice through the development of a short text.

This course relates to domains A1, A2, A3, and D2 of the RDF.

EligibilityMScR MVM All Years PhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years MScR SCE All Years
Date Tuesday 30-Sep-2014, 09:30 - 12:30
Venue Lecture Theatre 1, Ashworth Labs Kings Buildings
Bookings If you are eligible, you can Book a place on this course.
EligibilityMScR MVM All Years PhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years MScR SCE All Years
Date Monday 17-Nov-2014, 09:30 - 12:30
Venue Room 7.15, Michael Swann Building Kings Buildings
EligibilityMScR MVM All Years PhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years MScR SCE All Years
Date Wednesday 14-Jan-2015, 09:30 - 12:30
Venue Room 5326, James Clerk Maxwell Building Kings Buildings
EligibilityMScR MVM All Years PhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years MScR SCE All Years
Date Tuesday 14-Apr-2015, 09:30 - 12:30
Venue Room 5327, James Clerk Maxwell Building, King's Buildings Kings Buildings

Writing a Literature Review - College of Science and Engineering and Medicine and Veterinary Medicine

Description

The literature review is a key component of a PhD, because it motivates and contextualises key research issues. Developing a review is a complex task which involves selecting, organising and evaluating source material; reading actively while taking effective notes; and shaping relevant information into a coherent piece of writing. This workshop offers practical ways of making this process manageable and beginning to develop a review.

 

This course relates to domains A1, A2, and D2 of the RDF.

 

Prerequisite

If possible, students should have already attended 'Effective Writing: The Writing Process'

Pre-Course Work

Participants need to bring an article (by another author) that they plan to refer to in their literature review.

EligibilityMScR MVM All Years PhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years MScR SCE All Years
Date Tuesday 04-Nov-2014, 09:30 - 12:30
Venue Room 7.15, Michael Swann Building Kings Buildings
EligibilityMScR MVM All Years PhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years MScR SCE All Years
Date Friday 20-Feb-2015, 09:30 - 12:30
Venue Room 5326, James Clerk Maxwell Building Kings Buildings

Writing an Informatics Research Paper

Description

This course is for Informatics, 2nd and 3rd Years.

During a full afternoon, this lecture discussion will cover the basics of what you need to know to write a scientific paper and get it accepted at the journal of your choice. We will start by discussing a strategy for reading scientific papers, then carry on with the analysis of an example paper published in the journal Science.

 

Following this, we will discuss the different types of scientific papers and the different types of journals available for Informatics publications. Some attention will be given to explaining what an impact factor is and how to choose the best journal for your work.

 

We will then discuss the process of producing a paper from beginning to end. This will start with the importance of working with your lab head to decide when you are ready to write, why it is important to choose a title very early on in the process. We will end with how to respond to comments from journal editors and scientific referees.  In between, we will discuss what goes where in the manuscript, what data manipulations are acceptable (and some that are not!), how to explain your main points clearly, how to ensure that referees are not confused when they read your paper, and how your lab-mates and colleagues can help you to prepare a better manuscript. Significant attention will also be given to explaining how the editorial process works at common biological journals, and how to effectively interpret and then deal with comments from referees.

This course relates to domains A1, A2, A3 and D2 of the RDF.

EligibilityPhD SCE Informatics All Years
Date Wednesday 19-Nov-2014, 13:30 - 16:30
Venue Lecture Theatre 5, IAD, 7 Bristo Square Central Area

Writing a Research Paper - School of Biology

Description

This course is for Biology, 2nd and 3rd Years.

During a full afternoon, this lecture discussion will cover the basics of what you need to know to write a scientific paper and get it accepted at the journal of your choice. We will start by discussing a strategy for reading scientific papers, then carry on with the analysis of an example paper published in the journal Science.

 

Following this, we will discuss the different types of scientific papers and the different types of journals available for biological publications. Some attention will be given to explaining what an impact factor is and how to choose the best journal for your work.

 

We will then discuss the process of producing a paper from beginning to end. This will start with the importance of working with your lab head to decide when you are ready to write, why it is important to choose a title very early on in the process. We will end with how to respond to comments from journal editors and scientific referees.  In between, we will discuss what goes where in the manuscript, what data manipulations are acceptable (and some that are not!), how to explain your main points clearly, how to ensure that referees are not confused when they read your paper, and how your lab-mates and colleagues can help you to prepare a better manuscript. Significant attention will also be given to explaining how the editorial process works at common biological journals, and how to effectively interpret and then deal with comments from referees.

This course relates to domains A1, A2, A3 and D2 of the RDF.

Precourse Work

Students should be familiar with common concepts in biological research, have experience in reading the primary literature, and have a minimum of 6 months laboratory experience.

Prerequisites

Course is open to all Ph.D. students working in Biological research.  Experience with Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, Biochemistry or Genetics is desirable, though not essential.

EligibilityPhD SCE Biology 1st Years PhD SCE Biology 3rd Year PhD SCE Biology 2nd Years
Date Tuesday 03-Mar-2015, 13:30 - 16:30
Venue Room 7.15, Michael Swann Building Kings Buildings

Writing Clinic

Description

Sign up for a writing clinic if you would like individual feedback on your writing or if you struggle with particular writing issues.

Writing clinics enable researchers to get one-to-one feedback that focuses on their writing habits and challenges. You will be asked to submit a piece of writing in advance and book a slot, during which you can discuss any writing-related problems you may have, and/or get constructive suggestions for improving your writing. (25 minutes per student)

This course relates to domains B1 and D2 of the RDF.

Time Slot

Each student will be allocated a 30 minute slot.

Although you will be given a dedicated 30 minute time slot students who sign up to this course MUST ensure they keep the entire course duration free (3 hours) as we wil be unable to confirm your dedicated slot until 3 days before the course commences.

Prerequisite

If possible, students should have attended 'Effective Writing: The Writing Process

Pre-Course Work

If you sign up to this course, you will be assigned a 25-minute slot for writing feedback/support during the writing clinic. It's up to you how you decide to use that time; you can tailor it to your needs and priorities. The format that works best for most people is to submit a piece of writing in advance; this allows me to check through it beforehand and make the most of the time available. Work in progress is fine! I won't mark your writing or show it to anyone, so don't stress about it. What I will do is reflect back what I see as the strengths and weaknesses of your writing. I will focus on recurrent patterns rather than one-off instances. If you want me to look at your writing in advance, you need to send it to me (mimo.caenepeel@gmail.com) two days before the clinic. Please send your text in .doc, .docx or .pdf format. I will focus on the first two or three pages for feedback.

EligibilityMScR HSS All Years PhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years PhD HSS All Years MScR SCE All Years MScR MVM All Years
Date Wednesday 05-Nov-2014, 09:30 - 13:00
Venue Room 1.205b, IAD, 7 Bristo Square Central Area
EligibilityMScR HSS All Years PhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years PhD HSS All Years MScR SCE All Years MScR MVM All Years
Date Monday 08-Dec-2014, 09:30 - 13:00
Venue Room 1.205b, IAD, 7 Bristo Square Central Area
EligibilityMScR HSS All Years PhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years PhD HSS All Years MScR SCE All Years MScR MVM All Years
Date Tuesday 03-Feb-2015, 09:30 - 13:00
Venue Room 1.205b, IAD, 7 Bristo Square Central Area
EligibilityMScR HSS All Years PhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years PhD HSS All Years MScR SCE All Years MScR MVM All Years
Date Tuesday 28-Apr-2015, 09:30 - 13:00
Venue Room 1.205b, IAD, 7 Bristo Square Central Area

Writing for Popular Audiences

Description

This course deals with issues around communicating your research for popular audiences. In particular the differences between research articles and news and online media are dealt with. The course involves practical writing tasks focused on writing texts such as micro-blogs, press-releases, newspaper articles, and websites. Participants will see how the audience and structure of news and online media can affect how research comes across.

This course requires participants to work individually and in small groups, as well as to occasionally contribute to whole group discussions. The course is interactive and based on experiential and reflective learning models. The content is evidence based, drawing on linguistics, sociology and education research on research writing. All activities are practical and directly relevant to writing a research paper.

Audience: Researchers, experienced or novice, staff or postgraduate, who are publishing research and wish to improve their skills at writing for popular audiences.

BookingsThere are currently no events scheduled for this course. Please check back later.

Writing for Publication

Description

Publications are central to the success of departments as well as the careers of individuals, but getting your work published can be daunting, challenging and even perplexing. This workshop aims to demystify the publication process by breaking it down into stages and providing information and tips for each step. We will look at developing a publication strategy; revising material into a publishable article; targeting a journal; preparing a manuscript; working with editors; and making the most of the review process. 

EligibilityMScR HSS All Years PhD SCE All Years PhD MVM All Years PhD HSS All Years MScR SCE All Years MScR MVM All Years
Date Wednesday 04-Feb-2015, 09:30 - 12:30
Venue Room 1.07, Main Library Central Area

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