Divinity courses in 2012/13

We offer a wide variety of courses - on major religious traditions, on new religious movements, on religion and contemporary culture.

We presume no particular religious standpoint. Our community includes people of different faiths and of none.

We welcome students from across the University to take our courses as outside subjects. We also welcome visiting students to join our courses:

For more detail of undergraduate programmes please view our undergraduate information:

Our courses

Biblical Studies

Courses in this area investigate a wide range of texts, approaches, and issues, working with the sacred scriptures of Christian and Jewish faith-communities, and also with a rich assortment of evidence from the times and cultures in which the biblical writings were composed.

Year 1/2 (Level 8)

Introducing Biblical Studies

An introduction to the Scriptures of the Jewish and Christian traditions and to modern scholarly study of these writings.

Assessment
Assessment is based on two 1500-word essays (15% each), regular attendance/participation in a course seminar (10%), a written degree exam (60%).

Course organiser: DR DAVID REIMER
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Introducing Biblical Studies
Course syllabus (PDF)

Biblical Texts: Genesis and Mark

This course provides both an introduction to biblical exegesis and a detailed reading of two important biblical texts: Genesis and Mark's Gospel.

Assessment
Assessment is based on two 1500-word essays (15% each), regular attendance/participation in a course seminar (10%), a written degree exam (60%).

Course organiser: DR HELEN BOND
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Biblical Texts: Genesis and Mark
Course syllabus (PDF)

Introducing Biblical Hebrew

An introduction to Biblical Hebrew for beginners.

Assessment
Regular in-class tests (30%), a cumulative mid-semester test (10%), and a final exam (60%).

Course organiser: DR DAVID REIMER
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Introducing Biblical Hebrew
Course syllabus (PDF)

Introducing New Testament Greek

An introduction to the grammar and vocabulary of the Greek New Testament, with selected readings.

Assessment
Fortnightly in-class vocabulary quizzes (20%), a class exam (20%), degree exam (60%).

Course organiser: DR PAUL FOSTER
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Introducing New Testament Greek
Course summary (PDF)

Reading the Old Testament

A study of selected texts from the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament in translation.

Assessment
One 2000 word essay 30%; Seminar preparation 10%; Degree examination 60%.

Course organiser: PROF HANS BARSTAD
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Reading the Old Testament
Course syllabus (PDF)

Reading the New Testament

A focused study of selected writings and/or major themes in the New Testament or issues in contemporary New Testament studies.

Assessment
One essay. Essay 40%; Degree exam 60%.

Course organiser: DR PAUL FOSTER
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Reading the New Testament
Course syllabus (PDF)

Intermediate Biblical Hebrew

Consolidation of structured grammar learning; plus a study of the following Biblical Hebrew texts: 1 Samuel 1; Jonah; Deuteronomy 5-6; Amos 3-5.

Assessment
Class exam (40%) + Degree exam (60%).

Course organiser: PROF TIMOTHY LIM
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Full Year

Course summary (PDF):
Intermediate Biblical Hebrew
Course syllabus (PDF)

Intermediate New Testament Greek

Consolidation of grammar and vocabulary of the Greek New Testament and readings in selected passages.

Assessment
Class test (40%) + Degree exam (60%)

Course organiser: DR HELEN BOND
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Full Year

Course summary (PDF):
Intermediate New Testament Greek
Course syllabus (PDF)

Year 3/4 ( Level 10)

Biblical Hebrew Texts B

Extended selections from the Hebrew Bible: introduction, translation, and textual and exegetical commentary.

Assessment
Seminar presentations/participation 10%; Essay 30%; Exam 60%.

Course organiser: DR DAVID REIMER
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Biblical Hebrew Texts B

The Gospels

Advanced study of the canonical Gospels as to their respective emphases, structure and likely purposes, with attention also to extra-canonical (apocryphal) gospels. Selected passages of a given canonical Gospel will be given more in-depth attention.

Assessment
Essay (ca. 2,500 words) = 40%; Written exam (2 hrs) = 60%

Course organiser: DR PAUL FOSTER
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
The Gospels

Writings of the Apostle Paul

A study of one or more of Paul's epistles involving close attention to exegesis, literary criticism, religious/theological themes and historical questions.

Assessment
10% weekly reading-reports; 30% essay (ca. 2500 words); 60% degree examination.

Course organiser: DR MATTHEW NOVENSON
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Writings of the Apostle Paul

Women and Religion in the New Testament World

A study of women in the religious life of early Christianity and the Roman-era religious environment through examination of key texts and other evidence.

Assessment
10% on seminar presentations and participation, 30% on an essay, 60% on degree examination.

Course organiser: DR HELEN BOND
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Women and Religion in the New Testament World

The Dead Sea Scrolls and Christian Origins

Detailed study of aspects of the Qumran community, the biblical texts from the eleven caves, and relationship to the beginnings of Christianity.

Assessment
10% on seminar presentations and participation, 30% on an essay, 60% on degree examination.

Course organiser: PROF TIMOTHY LIM
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
The Dead Sea Scrolls and Christian Origins

Hebrew Prophecy

Explorations in the complete biblical prophetic corpus complementing the detailed exegesis of prophetic texts undertaken in other courses.

Assessment
10% Presentation; 30% Essay; 60% Degree exam

Course organiser: PROF HANS BARSTAD
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Hebrew Prophecy

Method in Reading the Hebrew Bible

The aim of this course is to deepen the understanding of the methods used in the academic study of the HB/OT, with emphasis placed on contemporary methods.

Assessment
All students will be assessed on the basis of seminar performance (10%), a 2000 word research essay (30%) and a final exam (60%).

Course organiser: PROF HANS BARSTAD
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Method in Reading the Hebrew Bible

Early Jewish Texts

A selection of Jewish texts dating to the Graeco-Roman period, including apocalypses, apocrypha, pseudepigrapha, apocalypses and novels.

Assessment
10% class participation, 30% 2,500 word essay and 60% exam

Course organiser: PROF TIMOTHY LIM
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Early Jewish Texts

Reading the Bible and Literature

This course will explore the cross-over areas of interest in the fields of biblical and literary studies. Issues arising from a consideration of the Bible in literature and of reading the Bible as literature will be discussed. The course will begin with a brief survey of literary approaches to the Bible and of the Bible's influence in literary texts. Then, through readings of specific literary and biblical texts, the interplay between the Bible and literature will be explored. Readings from different critical perspectives will be offered, including those of intertextuality, reader-response, feminism and postmodernism.

Assessment
A 2,000 word class essay (20%); a short book review (10%); a presentation given in class (10%); an examination at the end of the course (60%).

Course organiser: DR HELEN BOND
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Reading the Bible and Literature

Advanced Greek Texts

A selection of readings from the Greek Old Testament, Greek New Testament, and other Greek writings of the Hellenistic and Roman periods, along with some elements of advanced grammar and vocabulary.

Assessment
10% on regular class attendance and preparation, 30% on a translation notebook, 60% on 2-hour written examination.

Course organiser: DR PAUL FOSTER
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Advanced Greek Texts

Intermediate Biblical Hebrew (Honours)

This honours course aims to consolidate reading of classical Hebrew, to enrich experience of textual criticism and exegesis of the Hebrew Bible, and to apply these skills into the wider activities of the study of biblical texts.

Assessment
In-course assessment (30%) + Essay of 2000 words (10%) + Degree exam (60%)

Course organiser: DR DAVID REIMER
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Full Year

Course summary (PDF):
Intermediate Biblical Hebrew (Honours)

Intermediate New Testament Greek (Honours)

This honours course aims to consolidate reading of New Testament Greek, to enrich experience of textual criticism and exegesis of the Greek New Testament, and to apply these skills into the wider activities of the study of biblical texts.

Assessment
In-course assessment (30%) + Essay of 2000 words (10%) + Degree exam (60%).

Course organiser: DR HELEN BOND
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Full Year

Course summary (PDF):
Intermediate New Testament Greek (Honours)

Old Testament Theology

An examination of theological themes in Jewish and Christian interpretation of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament.

Assessment
10% on seminar presentations and participation, 30% on an essay, 60% on degree examination.

Course organiser: DR DAVID REIMER
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Old Testament Theology

New Testament Christology

A topical study of theological perspectives on Jesus attested in the earliest Christian texts, with some attention to Jewish precedents and later Christian developments, covering questions such as: Why was Jesus identified by his followers as the Jewish messiah? Where did the idea of an antichrist come from? How did Jesus come to be thought of as God?

Assessment
10% seminar presentation; 30% essay (c 2500 words); 60% degree examination.

Course organiser: DR MATTHEW NOVENSON
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
New Testament Christology

History of Christianity

Courses in this area look at the development of Christianity across the centuries and around the world. Historical methods are used, with sensitivity to theological perspectives and to insights from social, political and economic history and social anthropology.

Year 1/2 (Level 8)

History of Christianity as a World Religion 1A

The course aims to provide students with a comprehensive view of the global Christian movement in time and space. 1a. Considers the period from its Middle Eastern and European origins in theological and sociological/political terms to the Inquisition (50.CE to 1500)

Assessment
One Essay (20%); One weblog entry on the course website, together with tutorial presentation (10%) AND weekly comments on the website backed up by participation in the tutorial (10%); Degree exam (60%).

Course organiser: DR SARA PARVIS
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
History of Christianity as a World Religion 1A
Course syllabus (PDF)

History of Christianity as a World Religion 1B

The course aims to provide students with a comprehensive view of the global Christian movement in time and space. It considers the period from the Reformation to the present. (1500 CE to present), including mission and ministry in Africa, Latin America, Asia and North America, as well as following changes in Europe.

Assessment
Assessment is by one essay (30%), one tutorial presentation (10%) and a degree exam (60%).

Course organiser: PROF BRIAN STANLEY
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
History of Christianity as a World Religion 1B
Course summary PDF

Christianity before Constantine, 100-306

An examination of the development, self-understanding and self-definition of Christianity before Constantine in the setting of the religiously pluralistic society of the Roman Empire.

Assessment
Essay 2000-words (30%), Weblog contribution (10%), Degree exam (60%).

Course organiser: DR SARA PARVIS
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Christianity before Constantine, 100-306
Course syllabus (PDF)

Social Christianity in Britain, Germany and the
United States, 1848-1930

What should be the Christian response to the problems of modern urban-industrial societies? Is it possible to maintain a Christian society amid the complexities of industrialisation, urbanisation, global trade networks and democratic politics? How much influence can the Churches as institutions exercise in today's multi-ethnic cultures?

This course explores these questions by considering the Churches' responses to modernisation in the world's three most advanced industrial nations (Great Britain, Germany, US) during the later nineteenth and early twentieth century. In particular, it investigates 'social Christianity', in which Christians struggled to revive the idea of the Kingdom of God amid class strife, racial and ethnic tensions, mass deprivation, rapid social and economic change, and international rivalries.

Students will study key proponents of the movement, including F.D. Maurice and William Temple (UK), Adolph Harnack and Karl Barth (Germany), Walter Rauschenbusch and Reinhold Niebuhr (US).

Assessment
Attendance at the weekly seminars is required, and students are expected to contribute intelligently to seminar discussions on the basis of the specified reading. The summative assessment has three components:

  1. 2000-word essay chosen from a wide choice of titles (30%)
  2. contributions to the seminar blogging/discussions (10%)
  3. written degree examination (60%).

Course organiser: DR STEWART BROWN
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Social Christianity in Britain, Germany and the United States, 1848-1930
Course syllabus (PDF)

Year 3/4 (Level 10)

Augustine in his Age

The thought of Augustine in the context of the Christian and educational culture of his day and the decline of the Roman Empire in the West. The course will concentrate on four works: the Confessions, the City of God, On Christian Teaching (De Doctrina Christiana) and On the Trinity.

Assessment
Three 1000-word blog-postings (3x10% = 30%), weekly comment on the postings of others (10%), degree examination (60%).

Course organiser: DR SARA PARVIS
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Augustine in his Age

The Making of Christian Orthodoxy 325-451

An examination of the historical and doctrinal forces behind the first four ecumenical councils, Nicaga (325), Constantinople 1 (381), Ephesus (431) and Chalcedon (451) and their definitions of the nature of God and of Christ.

Assessment
Seminar participation 10%, coursework 30%, degree examination 60%.

Course organiser: DR SARA PARVIS
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
The Making of Christian Orthodoxy 325-451

Paradise Lost? Christianity in the Pacific 1668-1999

The course will examine the history of Christianity in the Pacific in context of change and continuity over a period of three hundred years. Through an examination of primary sources drawn from diverse perspectives students will be encouraged to reflect critically on the nature, interpretation and significance of the encounter between European Christianity and the religions of the Pacific; the forms of Christianity which have emerged there; and the impact of religious change on Pacific societies.

Assessment
Essay 2000 words 30%; Presentation and contribution to discussion [including WebCT forum] 10%; Exam 60 %

Course organiser: DR SARA PARVIS and KIRSTY MURRAY
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Paradise Lost? Christianity in the Pacific 1668-1999

Byzantine Church and Society 451-1672

An examination of the major historical events and theological movements affecting the world of Byzantine Orthodoxy from the Council of Chalcedon to the early Ottoman empire.

Assessment
Students will be assessed by end of semester examination (60%) and written coursework (40%).

Course organiser: DR PAUL PARVIS
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Byzantine Church and Society 451-1672

Evangelism and Empire: Christianity
in Africa, 1800 to the present

This course introduces some of the most important themes in the Christian history of Africa from the early nineteenth century to the present day. It pays attention to the interaction of European and indigenous traditions through a series of case studies of conversion and religious innovation. It raises issues which remain of crucial relevance today, such as the connections between religious change and structures of political and economic power, or the two-way relationship between religious and ethnic identity.

Assessment
10% seminar presentations and participation, 30% essay, 60% degree examination.

Course organiser: PROF BRIAN STANLEY
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Evangelism and Empire: Christianity in Africa, 1800 to the present

Medieval Religion in Scotland, c1400-c1560

An examination of the religion of late medieval Scotland and its relationship to all levels of Scottish society.

Assessment
40% essay; 60% degree examination.

Course organiser: PROF JANE DAWSON
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Medieval Religion in Scotland, c1400-c1560

Religious Studies

Courses in this area focus on the integral part religions play in human culture. They examine the phenomenon of religion in a variety of traditions and contexts, and consider theories of religion across diverse cultures.

Year 1/2 (Level 8)

Lived Religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam

An overview of three historically related religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam with a focus on their modern expressions and social contexts, as well as the relationships between historical and contemporary studies of these religions.

Assessment

  1. Two hour examination, answering three questions (60%)
  2. Essay on assigned topic of 2000 words (25%)
  3. Tutorial preparation (5%)
  4. Tutorial participation (5%)
  5. Tutorial presentation (5%)

Course organiser: PROF MONA SIDDIQUI
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Lived Religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam
Course syllabus (PDF)

Global Religions: South Asian, Indigenous
& New Traditions

An overview of Indigenous Religions and the religions of Asia with attention to the connections between them historically and thematically.

Assessment

  1. Two hour examination, answering three questions (60%)
  2. Essay on assigned topic of 2000 words (25%)
  3. Tutorial preparation (5%)
  4. Tutorial participation (5%)
  5. Tutorial presentation (5%)

Course organiser: DR ARKO LONGKUMER
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Global Religions: South Asian, Indigenous and New Traditions
Course syllabus (PDF)

Religion in Culture: Theory, History & Interpretation

A review of historical, phenomenological and cultural approaches to the study of religion as these have developed in Europe and North America since the late nineteenth century, drawing attention to the mutual interaction of these methodologies through consideration of key scholars and debates.

Assessment

  1. Two hour examination, answering three questions (60%)
  2. Essay on assigned topic of 2000 words (25%)
  3. Tutorial preparation (5%)
  4. Tutorial participation (5%)
  5. Tutorial presentation (5%)

Course organiser: DR STEVEN SUTCLIFFE
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Religion in Culture: Theory, History and Interpretation
Course syllabus (PDF)

Religion in Society: Community, People and Mind

The course provides an introduction to sociological, social anthropological and psychoanalytical perspectives on religion and religions. Students will be introduced to the development of theory and practice in these disciplines.

Attention will be drawn to the contributions and limitations of key contributors to these theories and practices. Emphasis will be placed in the tutorials on the writings of these key figures as well as on secondary issues.

Assessment

  1. Two hour examination, answering three questions (60%)
  2. Essay on assigned topic of 2000 words (25%)
  3. Tutorial preparation (5%)
  4. Tutorial participation (5%)
  5. Tutorial presentation (5%)

Course organiser: DR ELIZABETH KOEPPING
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Religion in Society: Community, People and Mind
Course syllabus (PDF)

Year 3/4 (Level 10)

Indigenous Religions: Sub-Saharan Africa

An examination of the major beliefs, practices and rituals of selected indigenous groups in West, East and Southern Africa.

Assessment
Assessment is by 10% Presentation, 30% Essay and 60% Degree Examination.

Course organiser: DR AFE ADOGAME
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Indigenous Religions: Sub-Saharan Africa

New Indigenous Religious Movements

A study of indigenously initiated and led new religious movements in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean and the Pacific, including African Independent Churches, Rastafari, Vodou, Umbanda, Candomble and the Unification Church.

Assessment
10% Presentation, 30% Essay, 60% Degree examination.

Course organiser: DR AFE ADOGAME
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
New Indigenous Religious Movements

Christianity in Asia: Past Patterns & Present Processes

This course examines the process of Christian expansion to and integration in Asia over the last 2000 years, particularly in East, South-East and South Asia. It will concentrate on the power, purpose and response of the missionized and the missionizing, each of whom have both agendas and agency, the interaction of Christianity with various local religious traditions and expectations and the indigenisation of Christianity in modern movements in Japan, China, India, Philippines, etc.

Assessment
10% seminar contribution, 15% class test, 30% essay, 45% research essay.

Course organiser: DR ELIZABETH KOEPPING
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Christianity in Asia: Past Patterns and Present Processes

Visual Representations of the Holocaust & Religion

Covering the three fileds of art, museums and film, students will be introduced to artworks including Chagall's crucifixion series, discuss the representation of the Holocaust in museums, and analyse filmic depictions ranging from documentaries (Resnais' 'Night and Fog') to more recent productions such as Verhoeven's 'Black Book' and Ruzowitzky's 'The Counterfeiters'. An analytic thread through this diverse material will be the identification of religious motifs and inscriptions of Jewishness.

Assessment
Class presentation and leading the following discussion (20%); Essay (20%); Degree Exam (60%).

Course organiser: DR HANNAH HOLTSCHNEIDER
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Visual Representations of the Holocaust and Religion

Religion & Nationalism in the Contemporary World

Focusing on the relationships between religion, geo-politics and the emergence of nationalism, this course investigates:

  • How religious nationalism and the spatialising of nationhood enable the territorialisation of religion and the nation.
  • How people envision their nation in terms of myths, symbols, texts, songs and poetry.
  • How indigenous systems interact with global ones, and how this is articulated.
Assessment
Presentation and participation in class (10%).
Course work: students are required to write one essay of 2,000 words (30%).
End of semester examination (60%).

Course organiser: DR ARKOTONG LONGKUMER
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Religion and Nationalism in the Contemporary World

Islam Past & Present: Issues of Gender & Ethics

This course will explore how scripture, theology and social realities reflect the complex and competing claims around issues of gender and ethics in Islamic thought and society. Through a variety of primary and secondary sources (in English), the course will look at select ethical themes including medical ethics and criminal law as well as the feminist and human rights debates which continue to challenge and shape Muslim societies and their understanding of spiritual and legal equality.

Assessment
Seminar presentation = 10% Essay = 40% Exam = 50%

Course organiser: PROF MONA SIDDIQUI
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Islam Past and Present: Issues of Gender and Ethics

New Age Beliefs and Practices

A study of the diffuse field of western popular religion known as 'New Age' or 'Holistic' spirituality, through a range of empirical case studies: historical, ethnographic and textual. The course explores the sociodemographic base of New Age religion in the context of Christian congregational decline and the pluralisation of religions in western culture.

Assessment
Oral book review(5%); Field report (20%); Essay (25%); 2 hour exam (50%).

Course organiser: DR STEVEN SUTCLIFFE
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
New Age Beliefs and Practices

Hindu Traditions: History, Power and Agency

This course will explore popular Hindu traditions, and will investigate its diversity through history, power and agency. It will challenge the homogenised 'world religions' model using anthropological methods in understanding religions, and highlight the significance of perspectives using ethnographic, textual, theoretical, and visual sources.

Assessment
Seminar presentations and general participation in the course - 10%;
Two class essays of 2,500 words each - 90% of overall course mark.

Course organiser: DR ARKOTONG LONGKUMER
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Hindu Traditions: History, Power and Agency

Theology and Ethics

Courses in this area cover a variety of topics and approaches, across the disciplines of Christian ethics and practical theology, systematic theology, historical and philosophical theology. An overarching theme is the connectedness between belief, practice and context.

Year 1/2 (Level 8)

God in Philosophy: Plato to Hume

An introduction to philosophical theology and some issues in the philosophy of religion, especially the question of how to inquire into 'God' philosophically. Lectures, seminars and set texts in this course treat a range of Christian and Jewish philosophers from Plato to the Enlightenment.

Assessment
2000-word Book Review (10%); 2000-word Essay (30%); Degree Exam (60%).

Course organiser: DR NICK ADAMS
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
God in Philosophy: Plato to Hume
Course syllabus (PDF)

Christian Theology: Approaches and Themes

An introduction to themes and methods in the study of theology which explores different ways of understanding revelation and authority; the doctrine of God; creation and Providence; human nature and sin; the person and work of Christ; the Church and its worship; the Christian life; the challenge of religious pluralism; eschatology. Students engage with key figures who have shaped the development of Christian theology, and consider the way theology interacts with disciplines such as philosophy, science, art and religious studies.

Assessment
Tutorial attendance and contribution (20%). Students are required to attend tutorials and to complete a tutorial sheet (a maximum of 2% per week); One essay (20%); Degree exam (60%) 2 hours.

Course organiser: DR MICHAEL PURCELL
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Christian Theology: Approaches and Themes
Course syllabus (PDF)

Ethics and Society

Students will be introduced to philosophical, biblical and theological approaches to Christian ethics. Each week is organised around a Biblical text and classic and contemporary readings.

Assessment
Weekly reflections of 300-400 words (20%), Essay 2000-2500 words (20%), Degree exam (60%).

Course organiser: PROF MICHAEL NORTHCOTT
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Ethics and Society
Course syllabus (PDF)

Religion, Violence and Peacebuilding

In this course students investigate the relations between religion, violence and building peace. Through consideration of a range of texts and international case studies participants analyse different kinds of theological reflection and practice, which seek to engage with the realities of violence and the practicalities of building peace.

Assessment
20% seminar presentation, participation and written reflection on tutorial text (300-400 words); 30% 2500 word essay; 50% examination.

Course organiser: DR CECELIA CLEGG
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Religion, Violence and Peacebuilding
Course syllabus (PDF)

Christian Theology: Doctrines and Debates

A critical and detailed study of selected doctrines of the Christian faith, dealing with such subjects as Scripture, the Trinity, Christology, pnematology, creation and providence. Particular attention is given to the biblical foundations and historical development of each doctrine, to the relation between the various doctrines, and to the contemporary interpretation and application of the doctrines.

Assessment
One 2000-word essay (20%); Five 400-word tutorial exercises (20%); One degree examination (60%).

Course organiser: DR PAUL NIMMO
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Christian Theology: Doctrines and Debates
Course syllabus (PDF)

Atheism in Debate

This course investigates contemporary atheism and its critics. It considers the work of Richard Dawkins (The God Delusion), Daniel Dennett (Breaking the Spell), Sam Harris (The End of Faith), and Christopher Hitchens (God is not Great), together with fierce rebuttals by their opponents. Visiting students are especially welcome.

Assessment
Details of Assessment:
Two essays, each of 2000 words. The first, due in the middle of the semester, will count for 30%. The second, due during the exam period, will count for 70%. The difference in weighting will permit formative feedback, and will permit students to build on what they have learned in the previous essay(s).

Course organiser: DR NICK ADAMS
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Atheism in Debate
Course syllabus (PDF)

Year 3/4 (Level 10)

Church, Sacraments and Ministry

The theology of the church and its ministry particularly in the context of the relationship of word and sacrament, relating these to contemporary issues facing the church and its ministry.

Assessment
Assessment: 20% on seminar presentations and participation, 30% on an essay, 50% on degree examination.

Course organiser: DR SUSAN HARDMAN MOORE
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Church, Sacraments and Ministry

Homiletics

An advanced course in preaching with special attention to hermeneutical, theological, practical and contextual issues.

Assessment
20% Presentation 30% Essay 50% Degree Examination

Course organiser: DR CECELIA CLEGG
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Homiletics

Ecology, Ethics and Religion

The study of ecological ethics, and the investigation of the relationship between ecological ethics and religions through primary texts in ecological ethics and religious environmentalism, and case studies of religious practice in relation to ecological issues.

Assessment
Essay 30%, weekly reflections 20%, 2 hour Degree examination 50%.

Course organiser: PROF MICHAEL NORTHCOTT
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Ecology, Ethics and Religion

Doctrine of Creation

The aim of this course is to study in historical and contemporary perspective Christian theological approaches to creation, particularly with reference to key primary sources. Attention will be devoted both to classical formulations and also to modern disputes which reflect issues in the science-religion dialogue.

Assessment
Seminar and blog contributions 20%; essay 30%; degree examination 50%.

Course organiser: PROF DAVID FERGUSSON
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Doctrine of Creation

Christ in Late Medieval and Renaissance Art

This course is designed to introduce students to visual expressions of Christology through Western Art in the late medieval period and the Renaissance. It is structured around themes from the church year (Christmas to Ascension) and introduces students to the uses of paintings in various contexts (ecclesiastical, domestic), symbolism, painting techniques and broad historical background. Visits to galleries and museums will form an important part of the work of the class.

Assessment
Assessment has three components:

  1. Seminar participation and presentations (10%).
  2. Short project which entails choosing a painting from the period 1100 to 1600, describing its historical context, the techniques used to produce it, the theological meaning it conveys, and the use to which it was put (30%).
  3. Two-hour examination in two sections. Section A reproduces two paintings: students must choose one and critically describe its Christological meanings. The paintings will be taken from books listed on the course bibilography. Section B is a choice of about six questions on themes from the course, of which students must answer one (60%).

Course organiser: DR NICK ADAMS
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Christ in Late Medieval and Renaissance Art

Religion & Philosophy: From Modernity to
Postmodernity

The human person has been described as homo religious. The phenomenon of religion continues to play a part in human life and society. This course considers the place and function of religion in enlightened modernity, its displacement in postmodernity, and its return.

Assessment
20% on weekly written and oral class contribution, 30% on an essay and revised blog, 50% on degree examination.

Course organiser: DR MICHAEL PURCELL
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Religion and Philosophy: From Modernity to Postmodernity

Film, Religion and Ethics

A critical study of religious and theological approaches to film, through an examination of cinematic narratives, directorial intentions and audience responses to selected films.

Assessment
20% on weekly written and oral class contribution, 30% on an essay and revised blog, 50% on degree examination.

Course organiser: PROF JOLYON MITCHELL
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Film, Religion and Ethics

Sign, Symbol, & Sacrament in Postmodern
Religion & Theology

The status of the sign is contested in postmodernity. This course considers the phenomenology of sign and symbol and sacrament in contemporary continental philosophy, theology, and religion.

Assessment
An ongoing "dossier de travail" portfolio on a fortnightly basis, each contribution demonstrating critical engagement with a particular text and issue by a particular key player, is to be compiled. The "dossier de travail" portfolio will involve engagement with at least two key players. Intended learning outcomes 3 and 4. (4 x 1000 = 4000 words) (50%). A final exam (50%). Intended learning outcomes 1 and 2.

Course organiser: DR MICHAEL PURCELL
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Sign, Symbol, and Sacrament in Postmodern Religion and Theology

Christology in the Nineteenth Century

An advanced course in Christology, investigating key writers and texts from the nineteenth century pertinent to this field of systematic theology.

Assessment
The assessment will beb based on: 10% - seminar presentation
10% - seminar participation
30% - essay of 2.000 words
50% - degree examination.

Course organiser: DR PAUL NIMMO
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Christology in the Nineteenth Century

The Theology of Karl Barth

This course explores key themes in the theology of Karl Barth, engaging critically with his work and reflecting carefully on aspects of its scholarly reception and contemporary adequacy.

Assessment
The assessment will be based on: 10% - seminar presentation
10% - seminar participation
30% - essay of 2.000 words
50% - degree examination.

Course organiser: DR PAUL NIMMO
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
The Theology of Karl Barth

Vocation, Ministry and Theology

The course will examine the theology of call, vocation and ministry, whether lay or ordained, within the Christian community. It is designed to help students to reflect more deeply on a range of theologies which underpin different aspects of Christian ministry with a view to beginning to identify the 'operative' theology that informs their sense of ministry.

Assessment
10% - seminar presentation;
10% - seminar participation;
30% - essay of 2,000 words;>br /> 50% - degree examination.

Course organiser: DR CECELIA CLEGG
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Vocation, Ministry, and Theology

Self as a Resource for Pastoral and Spiritual Care

Self is the principal gift a pastoral or spiritual carer has to offer another. This course, utilising theological, psychological and literary resources, aims to help students explore dimensions of their personhood which may influence their ability to offer sensitive pastoral or spiritual care.

Assessment
Seminar presentation (5%) and contribution to weekly seminars (5%); 30% on a 2500 word essay; 60% on the degree examination.

Course organiser: DR EWEN KELLY
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Self as a Resource for Pastoral and Spiritual Care

Transforming Conflict

An introduction to the principles and practices of conflict transformation and peacebuilding which focuses on the dynamics and stages of conflict and practical approaches to transforming it.

Assessment
10% on seminar presentation and participation in weekly seminars; 30% a 2000 word essay; 60% examination.

Course organiser: DR CECELIA CLEGG
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 2

Course summary (PDF):
Transforming Conflict

Theology and Spirituality of Reconciliation

Work towards reconciliation is one of the key factors in bringing an end to conflict and helping individuals and communities to co-exist peacefully. This course introduces the theology and spirituality of reconciliation, examining the dynamics of reconciliation and exploring some practical aspects of how to live in a reconciling way.

Assessment
10% on seminar presentation
10% participation in weekly seminars
30% a 2000 word essay
50% examination

Course organiser: DR CECELIA CLEGG
Credits: 20
Delivery period: Semester 1

Course summary (PDF):
Theology and Spirituality of Reconciliation

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