English Literature

US Literature

The MSc in US Literature asks students to consider the way key literary, cultural, political and philosophical texts have contributed to the development, interrogation and revision of notions of American identity and culture.

About

This taught Masters course offers students the opportunity to engage closely with a number of key texts that have contributed to the manifold meanings of American self-perception and national self-image from the nation’s revolutionary beginnings to its current incarnation in the wake of 9/11 and the continuing “War on Terror.”

Aims and outcomes

The primary aim of this course is to offer students the opportunity to engage closely and critically with some of the key texts that have helped to shape the manifold meanings of American self-perception and national self-image from the nation’s revolutionary beginnings to its current position as the unipolar superpower in contemporary global politics.

Programme structure

You will take the core course, the Research Methods course plus an option in each semester. The dissertation will be researched and written over the summer.

Fees and Funding

Fees and funding information for the MSc in US Literature is provided here

Teaching and assessment

This programme consists of taught elements and a dissertation.

Resources

Both the University Library (UL) and the National Library of Scotland (NLS) have strong holdings in all aspects of American literature and culture.

Contact details

If you have any queries regarding this programme, please contact the Programme Director:

Former students

I'm currently based in London, working in a very un-literary job doing insurance broking, which is what I did before my undergrad degree. I'm doing this for a little while whilst I save toward hopefully/maybe doing a PhD.

Entry requirements and apply online

You can apply online for this MSc programme.

Entry Requirements and apply online

Programme handbooks

View the current student handbook for this programme.

Programme handbook 2014-15

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