School of Divinity

Postgraduate Courses 2017/2018

Course list

Biblical Studies

BIST11002 Selected Topics in Biblical Studies (Semester 1)
An examination of major contributions to Biblical Studies, and their critical reception.

BIST11006 Dissertation (MTh/MSc in Biblical Studies) (Flexible)
This taught MTh/MSc is aimed at students who want to acquire knowledge, undertstanding, and skills in Biblical Studies and related areas at a postgraduate level. It can be followed as an end in itself, or to help students to assess their aptitude for research at PhD level.

BIST11010 Advanced Greek Readings B (Semester 2)
This course provides students with the experience of reading a number of Koine Greek texts from biblical literature and other early Christian texts.

BIST11011 Advanced Hebrew Texts A (Semester 1)
This course aims to consolidate reading of classical Hebrew and to enrich experience of textual history and exegesis of the Hebrew Bible.

BIST11017 New Testament Exegesis A (Semester 2)
This course focuses on detailed exegesis of selected texts from the Greek New Testament. Emphasis will be given to linguistic, theological, historical and literary issues.

BIST11021 Hebrew Bible in Historical-Critical Perspective (Semester 2)
The course aims at postgraduate students who want to deepen their abilities to read and understand the Hebrew Bible in its original language. It offers an introduction into the methods of historical-critical scholarship for those students, whose emphasis is on Biblical Studies or those who want to pursue a postgraduate degree in Hebrew Bible.

BIST11023 Intermediate New Testament Greek (PG) (Full Year)
This course consolidates reading of New Testament Greek, introduces students to textual criticism and exegesis of the Greek New Testament, and applies these skills in the wider activities of the study of biblical texts.

BIST11024 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew (PG) (Full Year)
This course consolidates reading of classical Hebrew, introduces students to textual criticism and exegesis of the Hebrew Bible, and to applies these skills into the wider activities of the study of biblical texts.

BIST11025 Introducing New Testament Greek (PG) (Semester 2)
An introduction to New Testament Greek for postgraduate students.

BIST11026 Introducing Biblical Hebrew (PG) (Semester 1)
An introduction to biblical Hebrew for postgraduate students.

Divinity

DIVI11003 Supervised Research Essay 1 (Flexible)
A semester-length supervised reading/research course for MTh by Research and MSc by Research students, the topic agreed between the student and his/her supervisor. A minimum of two supervision sessions is involved, and assessment is by an essay of 5,000 words length based on the research.

DIVI11004 Major Dissertation (Masters by Research) (Full Year)
Supervised major dissertation (up to 25,000 words length) in MTh by Research and MSc by Research in Religious Studies.

DIVI11005 Smaller Dissertation (Research Masters) (Full Year)
Supervised dissertation (up to 15,000 words), in the MTh by Research and the MSc by Research in Religious Studies (as part of the Supervised Essays + Dissertation track).

DIVI11006 Supervised Research Essay 2 (Full Year)
A semester-length supervised reading/research course for MTh by Research and MSc by Research students, the topic agreed between the student and his/her supervisor. A minimum of two supervision sessions is involved,and assessment is by an essay of 5,000 words length based on the research

DIVI11007 Supervised Research Essay 3 (Full Year)
A semester-length supervised reading/research course for MTh by Research and MSc by Research students, the topic agreed between the student and his/her supervisor. A minimum of two supervision sessions is involved, and assessment is by an essay of 5,000 words length based on the research.

DIVI11010 Dissertation (MSc in Science and Religion) (Full Year)
An opportunity to engage with a particular topic in the Science/Religion field in depth through research, culminating in a 15,000 word dissertation.

DIVI11011 Approaches to Research in Divinity and Religious Studies (Semester 1)
This course is designed to introduce postgraduate students in the School of Divinity to the research culture of the School, the norms of the different disciplines within Divinity and Religious Studies, and the resources available in the School (including library and computing facilities). It will also address critical thinking, critical reading, how to write a research essay, make presentations, thesis supervision, and the ethics of research.

DIVI11012 Approaches to Research: Biblical Studies (Semester 2)
A partner to Approaches to Research in Divinity and Religious Studies, the 10-credit S1 course on research skills for all PG students in the School of Divinity. This 10-credit S2 course is the devolved component for Biblical Studies students, in particular. It covers key critical issues in Hebrew Bible and New Testament, research tools and methods in Biblical Studies, and research proposal workshops for enrolled students.

DIVI11014 Approaches to Research: Religious Studies (Semester 2)
This course will prepare students for their final dissertation project by equipping them with research methods (preparation of research proposal and resources) and supervision on skills and methods.

DIVI11015 Approaches to Research: Science and Religion (Semester 2)
This course prepares students in the MSc in Science and Religion for their research dissertation.

DIVI11016 Approaches to Research: Theology in History (Semester 2)
This course prepares students in the MTh/MSc Theology in History for their research dissertation.

DIVI11017 Approaches to Research: World Christianity (Semester 2)
In the second semester of the Approaches to Research course, World Christianity candidates will study selected sources in the historical, social scientific, and theological study of world Christianity. These will be selected for their value in demonstrating key methodologies and with the overall aim of helping students prepare for their dissertation work and lay the foundations for further research in the area.

History of Christianity

ECHS11003 Creeds, Councils and Controversies: Patristic and Medieval (Semester 1)
The course is concerned with some of the major phases of theological debate and clarification in both Western and Eastern Christianity down to the late medieval centuries, and with their credal and other definitional outcomes.

ECHS11004 Creeds, Councils and Controversies: Reformation and Modern (Semester 2)
The aim of the course is to enable students to understand and reflect critically upon the historical contexts in which theology has been developed and assailed, c 1500-2000. The course therefore explores major challenges to faith that have shaped theology in the period, namely confessional divisions of the Reformation era; the development of biblical criticism; the rise of modern science; the spread in the West of industrial society, secularism, Christian pluralism; the globalisation and diversification of Christianity via the overseas mission movement; Nazi ideology.

ECHS11009 Dissertation (MTh/MSc in Theology in History) (Flexible)
The aim of the degree is to understand and reflect critically upon the historical context in which Christian theology is developed, tested and affirmed. The core courses focus on the most authoritatve ecclesiastical constructions of Christian belief and practice from the beginnings to the present day, working with key primary texts.

ECHS11014 Augustine: Confessions, City of God, On the Trinity (Semester 2)
The thought of Augustine in the context of the Christian and educational culture of his day and the decline of the Roman Empire in the West. The course will concentrate on the Confessions, the City of God, and On the Trinity, with a brief look at On Christian Teaching (De Doctrina Christiana) and some of Augustine's sermons.

ECHS11016 Byzantine Theology 451-1672 (Semester 1)
This course will look at major developments in Byzantine theology from the Council of Chalcedon to the aftermath of the Fall of Constantinople. The course will focus on a representative series of major texts, including conciliar documents, saints' lives, and writings of major theologians such as Maximus the Confessor and Gregory Palamas. Consideration will be given to the reciprocal influence between social and political questions on the one hand, and theological articulations on the other.

ECHS11019 Ancient Mediterranean Religions (Full Year)
This course offers a thematic approach to the Religions of the Ancient Mediterranean including Greco-Roman religions and diverse forms of Judaism and Christianity. Themes covered will include prophecy and oracles, religious festivals, sacred texts as subjects and objects, rites of initiation, gender and sexuality, migrants and foreigners, economic and social status, and death.

Religious Studies

REST11012 Theory and Method in the Study of Religion (Semester 1)
This core course explores key theoretical and methodological issues in the study of religion by reviewing of some of the foundational figures associated with the development of Religious Studies as a discipline, critically examining the relationships between phenomenology, history, philosophy, theology, cultural studies and the social sciences, analysing the significance of the new cognitive science of religion and engaging with pressing issues in the study of religion, such as the insider-outsider problem and the socially engaged scholar of religion.

REST11014 Dissertation (MSc in Religious Studies) (Full Year)
Development of a research topic exploring methodological issues in the study of religion and writing a dissertation on the topic under supervision.

REST11016 Reflections on Gender and Ethics in Classical and Contemporary Islam (Semester 2)
The course will explore how scripture, theology and social realities reflect the complex and competing claims around issues of gender and ethics in Islamic thought and society. Through a variety of primary and secondary sources (in English), the course will look at select ethical themes including medical ethics and criminal law as well as the feminist and human rights debates which continue to challenge and shape Muslim societies and their understanding of spiritual and legal equality.

REST11018 Hindu Traditions: Critical Investigations (Semester 2)
This course will explore popular Hindu traditions, and will investigate its diversity through history, power and agency. It will challenge the homogenised 'world religions' model using anthropological methods in understanding religions, and highlight the significance of perspectives using ethnographic, textual, theoretical, and visual sources.

REST11019 Religion and Nationalism: Theory and Performance (Semester 1)
The course aims to address the direct and indirect influences of religion on nationalism, and the relationship that exists between them. Two crucial areas will therefore be explored: a) the creative and subtle ways in which religious ideas are used as a repertoire for nationalist imagining; b) the role 'religion' plays as a contested social space shaped by power. The course aims to complement other optional courses on the history and contemporary interpretations of religion and society, in the Religious Studies and Divinity, Asian Studies, South Asian Studies, Anthropology and International Relations programmes.

REST11021 Theravada Buddhism from Benares to Bangkok (Semester 1)
This course explores a major branch of Buddhism from its origins in 5th century BCE North India to its present-day manifestations in South and Southeast Asia.

REST11022 Understanding the Hindu Epics: Mahabharata and Ramayana (Semester 2)
This course explores the two great Hindu epics, the Ramayana and the Mahabharata. Using English translations and secondary scholarship it will examine the key characters and plots, and relate them to wider Hindu debates about the nature of gods, the obligations of humans, and the cosmic battle between good and evil. It will also pose questions about the reception of the epics, and their role in Hindu and Indian religious history.

REST11023 New Spiritualities (Semester 2)
This course explores the field known in Europe and North America as 'new age' or 'holistic' spirituality. It aims to describe, contextualize and explain key features of these new spiritualities with reference to their content and structure and to their distribution in the population at large. By the end of the course students should be able to describe the recent history and ethnography of the 'new spiritualities', outline their key ideas and beliefs, and form a critical assessment of their impact, both on public understanding and within the academic study of religion.

Theology and Ethics

THET11001 Church, State and Civil Society (Semester 1)
This course aims to provide a broad overview of some of the most salient developments in the history of the relations between church, state and civil society. It is offered as an option within the MTh (Theology in History) programme, but is also available to other MTh/MSc programmes in the School of Divinity and more widely in the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Science.

THET11008 Christian Ethics (Semester 2)
The course is designed to enable postgraduate students to understand and critique key figures and approaches in twentieth century and contemporary Christian ethics, to deepen skills in Christian moral reasoning, and to mobilise such skills in relation to contemporary moral issues such as international conflict and its representation in the mass media.

THET11015 History of Science and Religion in the Christian Tradition (Semester 2)
This course aims to provide a broad overview of some of the most salient developments in the history of the relations between science and religion. It is offered as an option within the MTh (Theology in History) programme, but is also available to other MTh/MSc programmes in the School of Divinity and more widely in the College of Humanities and Social Science.

THET11026 Karl Barth's Church Dogmatics (Semester 2)
This course offers the opportunity for sustained critical engagement with Karl Barth's Church Dogmatics, one of the landmark works of twentieth century theology. The course will explore a selection of the theological doctrines treated by the text, such as election, Christology, pneumatology, ecclesiology, ethics, and the Christian life, and its methodology. At each stage, the course seeks to promote a critical yet constructive dialogue between Barth and alternative theological positions.

THET11027 Studies in Preaching (Semester 2)
In this course students will explore the nature of preaching in its historical, liturgical, pastoral and public contexts. Theologies of preaching will be examined with particular attention to the place of preaching in churches today. The insights of the 'new homiletic' will be critically evaluated. Through the course students will deepen their critical abilities in interpreting biblical texts for preaching, as well as being able to undertake critical evaluation of the form and the content of preaching.

THET11034 Economy, Ecology and Ethics (Semester 1)
This course explores the philosophical and theological roots and the social and ecological limits of modern political economy, and ecological and ethical alternatives.

THET11035 Cosmos, Cell and Creator (Semester 1)
An exploration of key issues recently explored in the science-theology field. Attention will be given to Big Bang cosmology, biological evolution, the neurosciences, the soul/mind problem, and the end of the universe. The aim is to foster an in-depth understanding of the role of religious belief in modern scientific practice and the challenge of science to religious orthodoxies.

THET11037 Science and Religion in Literature (Semester 2)
An exploration of issues of 'science and religion' through the lens of literature, both prose and poetry, spanning the last two and a half millennia. The aim is to develop a critical awareness of how the tensions between science and faith have been explored by great writers to a far wider extent than either traditional literary studies or the modern field of 'science and theology' has recognised.

THET11038 Science and Scripture (Semester 2)
The course will explore important points of contact between the science-religion debate and the Christian Bible, including trends in fundamentalist belief such as Creationism. The aim is to develop a critical awareness of methods of scriptural interpretation, and of how they have been influenced by modern science.

THET11039 Key Thinkers in Science and Religion (Semester 2)
The course explores the important historical and contemporary issues in the science-religion debate through close study of key contributors and their texts. The aim is to develop a critical awareness of some of the important themes of contemporary dialogue, including ways in which they have surfaced and re-surfaced in different guises through modern history.

THET11040 From diatribe to dialogue in Christian-Muslim relations (Semester 2)
This course looks at some of the most critical historical and contemporary discussions between Christians and Muslims on faith and doctrine.

THET11045 Jesus Christ in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries (Semester 2)
A course on Christology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: how were the person and work of Jesus Christ understood amidst the breathtaking social and intellectual changes in this period?

THET11046 Philosophy, Science and Religion 2: Life and Mind (online) (Semester 2)
This course will introduce students, at an advanced level, to key contemporary questions and debates in the intersection of science and religion. It provides the necessary background for graduate work in these areas.

THET11047 Drama, Religion and History (Semester 2)
In Drama, Religion and History students are encouraged to analyse in detail a range of set plays and theatrical revivals, alongside pertinent secondary literature. By focusing upon how individual productions reflect and interact with their distinct historical settings, the complex relationship between theatre and religion will be investigated.

THET11048 Liberation Theology in Context (Semester 2)
This is a level 11 course for students interested in exploring liberation theology in a variety of contexts. There will be discussions of theology in Latin America in the 1950/60s and the consequent theological movements that have a similar focus on liberation. These movements include but are not limited to: Feminist, Black, Womanist, LGBTQ, Mujerista, Palestinian, Minjung and Dalit theology. Within these contexts, topics explored will include post colonialism, economics, gender, sexuality, culture, politics, and nationality. Issues of power in relation to how theology is seen as being ?orthodox? will also be discussed.

THET11049 Scottish Literature, Imagination, and Faith (Semester 1)
Scottish Literature, Imagination, and Faith introduces Level 11 students to the work of some of the key writers dealing with faith and fiction in Scotland from the Romantic period to the late twentieth century. Students are encouraged to explore the connections between a varied range of Scottish poets, authors, and dramatists in their evolving national, historical, social and theological contexts.

THET11050 Science and Scripture (online) (Semester 2)
The course will explore important points of contact between the science-religion debate and the Christian Bible, including trends in the interpretation of creation and miracle stories, and in fundamentalist belief such as creationism. The aim is to develop a critical awareness of methods of scriptural interpretation, and of how they have been influenced by modern science.

THET11051 History of Science and Religion (online) (Semester 2)
This course aims to provide a broad overview of some of the most salient developments in the history of the relations between science and religion. Key episodes in the history of science and religion are explored in multi-disciplinary perspective. These cover material from the early church to the early 21st century, and seek to show the complex ways in which religion and science have been intertwined and have interacted.

World Christianity

WRCH11003 History of Christianity in Africa (Semester 2)
The course explores some of the major themes in the history of Christianity in Africa since the early nineteenth century. Attention is paid to the roles played by African missionaries and indigenous leaders as well as those of European missionaries. Major emphasis is placed on the study and detailed interpretation of key primary sources.

WRCH11015 Dissertation (MTh/MSc in Christianity in the Non-Western World) (Flexible)
This qualification offers candidates the opportunity to study in depth Christian history, thought and practice in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

WRCH11016 Critical Debates in Christian Mission (Semester 1)
Using David Bosch's 'Transforming Mission' as a general guide, the course looks at a range of new thinking and writing on mission since the 1960s, and seeks to challenge students to consider the relevance of new definitions of mission for the contexts in which they live and work.

WRCH11018 Selected Themes in the Study of World Christianity (Semester 1)
This core course offers candidates the opportunity to study in depth Christian history, thought and practice in and from Africa, Asia and Latin America. Primary attention is given to methods for the study of indigenous forms and expressions of christianity, to issues of culture and gender, and the changing patterns of relationship between Christianity in the West and other parts of the world. Issues of religious pluralism feature significantly in terms of the interaction between Christianity and other religious traditions.

WRCH11019 Christianity in Asia, 1700 to the Present (Semester 2)
This course surveys the varied fortunes of Christianity in Asia since 1700, paying particular attention to India and China. Issues of western imperialism, the impact of nationalism, ecumenical initiatives, the significance of the majority religious environment, and the development of indigenous Asian theologies will be central.

WRCH11020 Theologies of World Christianity (Semester 1)
This course offers critical engagement with Christian theologies developed in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, with particular focus on their approaches to cultural and sociopolitical concerns.

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