Edinburgh Imaging

About our students

Our students come from around the world & from a wide variety of educational backgrounds. Our alumni progress on to a number of careers after graduating from our programmes & courses.

 

Our applicants were born in & live all over the world:

Nationalities who apply, by region:
Edinburgh Imaging Academy applicant nationalities by region 2017

 

Domiciles by region 2017:
Edinburgh Imaging Academy applicant domiciles by region 2017

 

Infographic - 2017 graduate exit survey

We surveyed our graduating class of the 2016-2017 academic year & have summarized the findings in our infographic.

Edinburgh Imaging Academy Infographic - 2017 graduate exit survey
What was the top tip from our 2017 graduates to future students?
  • Set aside regular study times each & every week.

23 graduating students replied
  • 70% were enrolled on Imaging programmes, with award distributions as follows:

    • 52% exited with a Masters

    • 9% exited with a Certificate

    • 9% exited with a Diploma

  • 30% were enrolled on Neuroimaging programmes, with award distributions as follows:
    • 22% exited with a Masters

    • 4% exited with a Diploma

    • 4% exited with a Certificate

78% think our programmes will greatly help or be useful in career development
22% found our programmes useful, while not essential for career development
Where do our 2017 graduates work?
  • 57% in hospitals
  • 17% in a veterinary care setting
  • 13% in universities
  • 13% in a variety of other settings
How are our 2017 graduates employed?
  • 55% are doctors or vets
  • 32% work in the allied health professions, technical & IT fields (nursing, radiography, programming, image processing)
  • 5% work in academia
  • 13% are employed in a variety of other professions
Where do our 2017 graduates live?
  • 17% UK & Ireland
  • 26% Europe
  • 17% Asia
  • 17% North America
  • 13% Africa
  • 9% Australia & New Zealand
What did our 2017 graduates have to say about their experience on our programmes?
  • The programme helped me in my clinical work.
  • It has familiarized me with research & research methods.
  • I am more confident in my role within my research department.
  • It gave me the opportunity to be involved in research & publish it.
  • I've become more critical when reviewing journals

 

 

Alumni

Our alumni

The Edinburgh Imaging Academy is hugely proud of its rich alumni community.

Our alumni reflect the diversity & global outlook of our students, who come from a variety of countries, cultures & disciplines.

Our alumni often develop successful careers after graduation, in clinical / medical imaging, academia & industry.

 

Read about our alumni - their experiences & careers - since graduating:

Lara A. De Nicolo Savvides, Neurophysiologist - graduated 2016 - reflecting in 2017

"Embarking on the online distance Masters in Neuroimaging for Research was one of the best decisions I have ever made with regards to my career development. Not only did I get to interact with a diverse group of other students from around the world, I got taught by brilliant & enthusiastic scientists, about cutting edge imaging research & image analysis.
 
I am a Neurophysiologist, & although Neuroimaging is not directly required to perform Neurophysiology, I have found that knowledge of spinal MRIs helps me analyse nerve conduction study results better, such as when clinical symptoms for radiculopathy aren't always clear. Being able to combine information gleaned from my MSc, with my clinical findings, helps me clarify the clinical problem, enabling me to communicate findings better to the physicians, & also to guide them better into making a correct diagnosis & to choose the best treatment options. What I learnt on the MSc Neuroimaging for Research has definitely brought my career to a whole new level!
 
Given my professional commitments I enrolled on the intermittent route so I completed my degree in 5 years.
 
During this time I had to juggle a Neurophysiology laboratory, a marriage, a pregnancy, giving birth & raising a child, which eventually worked out wonderfully given the flexibility of the intermittent route. The availability of the tutors on a daily basis on the virtual environment enabled me to ask for help at any time; it was convenient for me & the tutor feedback was always prompt.
 
The Neuroimaging staff were so compassionate & understanding of my very hectic schedule; they did not hesitate to shift my assessment dates around in order to accommodate the birth of my daughter & the new routine which I had to adjust to. While raising my daughter, I could balance feeding / play times & studying independently: project deadlines, group work & the overall work load, I felt, were very reasonable.
 
The Skype meetings held twice or three times each year with my personal tutor enabled me to discuss concerns, my progress & any modifications which would help me manage online learning around my hectic schedule.
 
This MSc degree has given me the opportunity to develop my Neuroimaging research skills, so that I can embark on a Neuroimaging PhD.
 
I definitely would encourage others to pursue such a Master's degree, not only to develop scientific knowledge, but also to advance a medical or scientific career to superior level."
 
- Lara A. De Nicolo Savvides, 15 Aug 2017

Dr. med. univ. Susanne Diekmann, Radiologist - graduated 2010 - reflecting in 2016

Dr. med. univ. Susanne Diekmann graduated in 2010 with a MSc (distinction) in Neuroimaging for Research. She was in our very first cohort of students to enroll, and to graduate, from the programme. Dr. med. univ. Diekmann already came from a strong imaging background, & after graduating, completed the European Certificate of Neuroradiology, & the German Certificate of Neuroradiology.

In 2013 she was appointed to the Fraunhofer Institute for Medical Image Computing (MEVIS, www.mevis.fraunhofer.de), and continues to work there. In 2015 she was additionally appointed to Telemedicineclinic (TMC, www.telemedicineclinic.com).

Five years on from graduation, Dr. med. univ. Diekmann reflected on her motivation for taking the MSc Neuroimaging for Research programme & described her experiences while enrolled & her subsequent career following graduation in 2010:

"The program I was initially looking for had to meet two requirements:

  • Firstly, attendance had to enable me to keep up to date with medical imaging; to prepare me for further specialization in Neuroradiology; to prepare me for additional specialist differentiation in Neurosciences; to improve my English language skills; to make new academic, research and clinical contacts; & to provide me with a graduate degree, which would enhance my professional profile.
  • Secondly, the program had to be completely online, so that I could organize study around my maternity leave, while also working part time in a hospital.

The MSc Neuroimaging for Research perfectly met both my requirements. Intense attendance over a period of three years was fun & very interesting. I thought the content was well prepared and organised & supervision both competent & helpful.

The MSc Neuroimaging for Research has provided me with a solid platform to perform my job at Fraunhofer MEVIS. Fraunhofer MEVIS focuses on computer assistance for medical imaging. To allow us to develop our projects, it is necessary to have a profound understanding of the use of Neuroimaging, & Imaging more generally, in clinical studies, which in turn requires understanding the core parameters required to make meaningful calculations, & useful visualization.

What I learnt on the MSc programme helps me when it comes to defining new projects where various specialties (medical and non- medical) are brought together. Being aware of different approaches & challenges, closes gaps in understanding between disparate groups, helps better define tasks & improves study design."

- Dr. med. univ. Susanne Diekmann, 22 Jan 2016

 

 

 

We list here by date, types & titles of projects our MSc students have undertaken in previous years.

 

Year Type of Project Title
16-17
  • Systematic review
  • Analysis of existing data
Evolution & associations of global atrophy & white matter hyperintensities in older adults with normal cognition or mild cognitive impairment.
16-17
  • Systematic review
  • Meta-analysis
The prevalence of symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis & its risk factors: a meta-analysis.
16-17
  • Analysis of existing data
Comparison of cystoscopy & computed tomographic urography for the diagnosis of ectopic ureters & other causes of urinary incontinence in dogs - study on 14 cases.
16-17
  • Analysis of existing data
Evaluation of intracranial aneurysms treated by flow-diverting stents: a study to assess accuracy of follow-up of treated aneurysms by time-of-flight MR angiography, contrast enhanced MR angiography & by digital subtraction angiography.
16-17
  • Analysis of acquired data
Review & evaluation of automated quality control tools for functional MRI.
16-17
  • Systematic review
Distinguishing between high grade & low grade gliomas using advanced imaging tehniques: a literature review.
16-17
  • Analysis of existing data
Half-time gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging: impact of OSEM & resolution recovery on the assessment of myocardial perfusion & global left ventricular function: comparison with full-time imaging.
16-17
  • Analysis of existing data
Incidental findings for a population based brain MRI study in healthy volunteers  (STRADL Study).
16-17
  • Systematic review
The role of imaging in patient selection for epilepsy temporal lobe surgery.
16-17
  • Meta-analysis
Affect & cognition in theory of mind: a coordinate-based meta-analysis of functional MRI studies.
16-17
  • Systematic review
Impact of core infarct at baseline on clinical outcome in patients undergoing reperfusion therapies.
16-17
  • Systematic review
A systematic review of the image processing methods for computationally assessing the segmentation of white matter hyperintensities in stroke.
15-16
  • Analysis of existing data
Software tools for translational clinical to pre-clinical magnetic resonance image analysis.
15-16
  • Systematic review
The use of continuous EEG monitoring in predicting course of recovery in the acute ischaemic stroke patient & correlating findings with neuroimaging data: what studies are available that describe these links? What is the evidence that this complementary data can be considered significant enough to provide early prognostic information?
15-16
  • Systematic review
A systematic literature review & meta-analysis of the use of MR spectroscopy for the study,  diagnosis, subtype classification & prognosis of multiple sclerosis.
15-16
  • Analysis of existing data
Conventional MR signs warranting further MRCSF flowmetric study for diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus.
15-16
  • Analysis of acquired data
Integrated FDG PET/CT in the age of endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) - guided fine needle assay (FNA) in diagnosis & nodal staging of non-small cell lung cancer: factors that predict ‘positivity’ & clinical outcome.
15-16
  • Literature overview
A survey of the use of patient specific modelling for rupture prediction in abdominal aortic aneurysm.
15-16
  • Systematic review
The incidence of incomplete Hippocampal inversion in patients with epilepsy, status epilepticus & febrile seizures: a systematic review.
15-16
  • Systematic review
Systematic review of myocardial computed tomography perfusion techniques & its clinical applications.
14-15
  • Systematic review
Acute lacunar infarct & associated features of small vessel disease in brain stem & cerebellum: imaging characteristics & risk factors.
14-15
  • Systematic review
  • Questionnaire with data collection & analysis
Investigating existing guidelines and frameworks on management of incidental findings in neuroimaging research conducted at an Australian university & comparing the results with other guidelines around the world.
13-14
  • Systematic review
Transient global amnesia: does MRI brain imaging provide helpful diagnostic information?
13-14
  • Online review
A critical survey of open access online neuroimaging teaching case libraries & appraisal of their educational value.
13-14
  • Analysis of existing data
Comparing automated MR Spectroscopy with  formal histopathology & assessing the discrepancies.
13-14
  • Systematic review
Functional outcomes & recanalization rates of stent retrievers in acute ischaemic stroke: a systematic review & meta-analysis.
13-14
  •  Meta-analysis of existing data
The absolute risk of acute spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage growth over time & its determinants: individual patient data meta-analysis.
13-14
  • Systematic review
Cortical sensory motor reorganisation after limb amputation: empirical findings from neuroimaging.
13-14
  • Systematic review
Neuroimaging correlates of depression in Parkinson's disease: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.
13-14
  • Systematic review
Comparing differences in clinical outcomes between microelectrode & stereotactic MRI lead placement verification in Parkinson's disease patients treated with deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus: a systematic review
13-14
  • Data acquisition & analysis
MRI for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis: a pilot study comparing FLAIR* with modified ‘McDonald’ criteria.
12-13
  • Data acquisition & analysis
Investigating the image quality of adult CT brain studies on a Toshiba 320 slice scanner comparing volume & helical acquisition modes using ADIR and non-ADIR algorithms: a retrospective analysis & phantom study.
12-13
  • Systematic review plus pilot substudy
Investigating the role of neuroimaging in mild cognitive impairment (MCI): progress in the last decade.
12-13
  • Data acquistion
MRI brain atlas of the naked mole rat.
11-12
  • Systematic review
Systematic review of the evidence for fast MRI sequences in assessing paediatric neurosurgical conditions.
11-12
  • Reflective review
The psychoanalytic "ego" concept as might be seen through the lens of Neuroimaging research.
11-12
  • Analysis of existing data
White matter abnormalities in children with chronic kidney disease.
11-12
  • Opinion review
Advances in the imaging of spinal cord abnormalities in multiple sclerosis (opinion review).
11-12
  • Systematic review
Magnetic resonance techniques (structural MRI, MRS, fMRI & DTI) in obsessive-compulsive disorder: a literature review.
11-12
  • Analysis of existing data
A comparison of the white matter microstructure between subjects with refractory & non-refractory schizophrenia using DTI.
10-11
  • Systematic review
The use of imaging in the selection of patients for medial temporal lobe surgery for epilepsy: how good is the imaging evidence on which epilepsy surgery is based?
10-11
  • Data acquisition & analysis
Role of cerebellum in attention.
10-11
  • Systematic review
Thrombolysis (different doses, routes of administration & agents) for acute ischaemic stroke: an update of the evidence since the last Cochrane review.
10-11
  • Systematic review
Review of neuro-imaging role in the diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis.
10-11
  • Data acquisition & analysis
A retrospective review of the use of PET-CT in neurodegeneration with an emphasis on atypical Parkinson's disease
09-10
  • Systematic review
Carotid stent restenosis; imaging follow-up and reported restenosis rates.
09-10
  • Systematic review
Assessment of cerebrovascular reserve capacity with acetazolamide challenge test (ACT): a systematic review of imaging methods of ACT.
09-10
  • Systematic review
The use of fMRI in neurosurgical planning for brain tumours. How does it improve safety and efficacy of surgery? What is the available evidence?