Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences

Dr Tom MacGillivray

Dr Tom MacGillivray is a Senior Research Fellow & Image Analysis Core Laboratory Manager, Neuroimaging Sciences.

Dr Tom MacGillivray

Senior Research Fellow & Image Analysis Core Laboratory Manager

  • Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences
  • Clinical Research Imaging Centre
  • Edinburgh Clinical Research Facility

Contact details

Biography

  • Specialises in the field of image processing and analysis for clinical research
  • His team staffs the Image Analysis Core laboratory of the Clinical Research Imaging Centre joint with the Edinburgh Clinical Research Facility
  • The laboratory provides specialist support to investigators accessing data from a variety of modalities including MR, CT, PET, ultrasound and retinal imaging
  • Extensive experience facilitating research that features retinal imaging and includes studies on stroke, cardiovascular disease, MS, and age-related cognitive change
  • Co-ordinates an interdisciplinary initiative called VAMPIRE (Vascular Assessment and Measurement Platform for Images of the REtina) – aim is efficient, semi-automatic analysis of retinal images

Research summary

Modern medical imaging techniques provide output in a digital form and the data produced lends itself to computational post-processing and analysis. This improves image quality and produces more quantitative information from basic data.

My research develops and establishes in practice processing and analysis in a wide range of applications from microscopy to MRI. In particular, retina imaging, with development, could impact hugely on research into variety of diseases of the brain and of the body and ultimately improve patient care. We are developing this as a quick and non-invasive test to identify symptoms early or detect effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of interventions timely enough to alter treatment.

Research aims and areas of interest

  • Development of novel image processing algorithms for use in cutting-edge medical imaging and clinical research
  • Retinal image analysis combining multiple modes of scanning – fundus camera, Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope, OCT, Auto Fluorescence
  • Advance retinal analysis algorithm development – see VAMPIRE project for more details
  • Retinal imaging derived biomarker identification for neurodegeneration and systemic disease
  • Hub specialist equipment and expertise for performing retinal imaging and analysis via the Clinical Research Imaging Centre and CCBS – creating a world-leading Retinal Imaging Core Lab
  • Engage with Industry in improving the acquisition and broadening the application of retinal imaging
  • Develop retinal imaging as an effective way of monitoring disease severity or progression in neurodegeneration and other disease for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes

Research group members

  • Calum Gray - Research Fellow
  • Sarah McGrory – Research Fellow
  • Gavin Robertson – PhD Student
  • Devanjali Relan – PhD Student
  • Giorgos Papanastasiou – Research Fellow
  • Tom Pearson - PhD student
  • Enrico Pellegrini – Research Fellow

Collaborators

Prof Bal Dhillon, Dr Shyamanga Barooah, Dr James Cameron, Prof Siddharthan Chandran, Prof Joanna Wardlaw, Prof Dave Newby, Prof Edwin van Beek, Dr Fergus Doubal, Dr Scott Semple, Prof Ian Deary, Dr Cathie Sudlow, Prof Emmanuel Trucco (Uni of Dundee), Dr Jano van Hemert (Optos plc), Dr Tunde Peto (Moorfields Eye Hospital).

Sources of funding

  • Medical Research Council
  • Leverhulme Trust
  • SINAPSE
  • Optos plc
  • EPSRC
  • Diabetes UK
  • Innovate UK

Further information

My team staffs the Image Analysis Core laboratory of the state-of-the-art Clinical Research Imaging Centre (CRIC) joint with the Edinburgh Clinical Research Facility (CRF), at the University of Edinburgh. The laboratory provides specialist support to investigators accessing data from a variety of imaging modalities including MR, CT, PET, ultrasound and retinal imaging.

I co-ordinate an interdisciplinary initiative called VAMPIRE (Vascular Assessment and Measurement Platform for Images of the REtina) that brings together 10 international centres from the UK, Italy, Singapore and the US. The aim is efficient, semi-automatic analysis of retinal images and the pursuit of biomarker identification. VAMPIRE was the first automatic system ever applied to the UK Biobank retinal images.